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USAR Communications Cache CATF-1 by Captain Kevin R. Nida, LAFD Hand-Held radio operation, system expectations, repeaters, DC remotes and satellite telephones.

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Presentation on theme: "USAR Communications Cache CATF-1 by Captain Kevin R. Nida, LAFD Hand-Held radio operation, system expectations, repeaters, DC remotes and satellite telephones."— Presentation transcript:

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2 USAR Communications Cache CATF-1 by Captain Kevin R. Nida, LAFD Hand-Held radio operation, system expectations, repeaters, DC remotes and satellite telephones

3 Bendix/King EPV4142M 14 channels, 4 watts, Mhz.

4 EPV 4142 Top Controls On/Off Volume Control Turn clockwise past the detent to turn the radio on and continue to turn clockwise to increase volume, counterclockwise decreases volume

5 EPV 4142 Top Controls CG & Squelch Control Turn counterclockwise to the detent to activate CG. CG allows only our team to be heard on the radio. Full CCW is the normal mode of activation

6 EPV 4142 Top Controls Antenna The antenna must be snugly hand tightened. Use no tools to tighten

7 EPV 4142 Top Controls Channel Selector, 14 channels total Rotate clockwise to increase channel number, turn counterclockwise to decrease channel number

8 EPV 4142 Top Controls “Channel Busy” & “Low Battery” indicator Intermittently Flashes yellow when the channel is in use and flashes steady when battery is low

9 EPV 4142 Top Controls Scan Priority Select Switch Not used for your position or application Normally remains in “forward position”

10 EPV 4142 Top Controls Scan Select Switch Not used for your position or application Normally remains in “forward position”

11 EPV 4142 Top Controls T/A Repeat and Direct Switch Forward position selects “repeat” function Backward position select T/A (Simplex/Direct)

12 EPV 4142 Top Controls Transmit Indicator Glows red when radio transmits Flashes red when battery is low

13 EPV 4142 Side Connector & PTT Bar Side/Accessory Connector Should normally have the speaker mic or dust cover attached to keep dust and dirt out

14 EPV 4142 Side Connector & PTT Bar Push-to-Talk (PTT) Bar Push to talk Release to listen

15 Battery Removal Hold the radio in your right hand and with your right thumb, pull the battery retaining clip toward the top of the radio

16 Battery Removal With your left hand, rotate the battery counter clockwise 1/8 turn

17 Battery Removal Pull the battery away from the radio

18 EPV 4142 “AA” Battery “Clamshell” Holds nine “AA” alkaline batteries Only use alkaline batteries Do not mix new and old batteries, or brands or batteries

19 EPV 4142 “AA” Battery “Clamshell” Hold the orange case in one hand With the thumb of the same hand, press the center downward to expose the batteries

20 EPV 4142 “AA” Battery “Clamshell” Push the center downward and catch the battery tray with the other hand

21 EPV 4142 “AA” Battery “Clamshell” Pull the battery “ripcord” to remove the batteries Make sure to put the “ripcord” down in the base of the tray before reinstalling the batteries

22 Daily Radio Assessment check the following: Antenna Knobs Display Buttons Battery Latch Battery Accessories

23 Check the Antenna for: Cracks Breaks Severe Bends Loose or Broken Base Loose or Broken Connector Proper Type & Band Other Damage

24 Check Knobs Buttons & Switches for: If Loose or Missing Proper Position or Setting Proper Type Cracks or Unusual Wear

25 Check the Display & Indicators for: Cracked Display Window Apparent Moisture Under Glass Appropriate Icon for Appropriate Function Transmit & Receive Icons/Lights No Low Battery Indicator Voice Check

26 Check the Battery & Battery Latch for: Tightness on the Radio Battery Contacts Clean & No Debris on them No Cracks in the Battery Case No Low Battery Indicator Use Only Approved Manufacturer Replacement Batteries

27 Check the Accessories for: Speaker Microphones: Condition of the Cord, Microphone PTT button, Switches & Antenna if equipped with one Overall Unusual Wear, Unsafe Condition

28 Batteries & Maintenance Nickel Cadmium: Cycle Often, Will Loose Capacity if Not Used Often and to 80% of it’s Capacity Discharge at least to20% of it’s capacity before recharging Keep a spare battery with you or on the rig Loses about 1% per day if left alone, dead in days

29 Nickel Cadmium, Cont. Approximate Month Life Span Replace After 18 months Slow to discharge, but die quickly at the end and can die sometimes without warning Keep an Alkaline Pack as a Back-Up Keep a Monthly Maintenance Log by Battery Discard if Less Than 80% of Total Capacity

30 Alkaline & “AA” Packs Used by USFS, CFD, FEMA & USAR Reliable in-Field Replacement Less Initial Cost than a Ni-Cad Great for Disaster Relief Operations No Ongoing Maintenance No Outside Electrical Source or Additional Personnel Required to Charge

31 Radio Coverage Expectations Radio Signals are High Frequency Light They can be Interrupted by Natural and Man-made Objects Know the Path Between You and Your Objective, Keep Barriers to a Minimum Increasing Elevation and Eliminating Barriers are the Best Tools in Correcting Range Problems

32 Radio Position Is Important Radio waves travel vertically Keep the radio upright to get the best reception

33 Radio Position Is Important Do not hold the radio horizontally The radio coverage is severely diminished when the radio is held horizontally

34 UHF & Elevation 420 Mhz. ELEV.4 WATTS ERP10 WATTS ERP40 WATTS ERP 3'1.0 MI.1.2 MI.1.5 MI. 10'1.5 MI.1.8 MI.2.3 MI. 20'2.0 MI.2.3 MI.2.9 MI. 40'2.5 MI.2.8 MI.3.8 MI. 50'2.8 MI.3.2 MI.4.2 MI. 100'3.5 MI.4.2 MI.5.3 MI. 150'4.1 MI.4.8 MI.6.2 MI. 200'4.5 MI.5.3 MI.6.8 MI. 500'6.3 MI.7.4 MI. 9.5 MI. 1000'8.1 MI.9.5 MI.12.2 MI. 2000'10.3 MI.12.2 MI.14.9 MI. 5000'13.9 MI.15.8 MI.19.3 MI.

35 Attenuation Factors Wearing the radio on your belt. It is closer to the ground and your body absorbs the RF signal Holding the radio horizontally. Radio waves on most public safety radio systems travel vertically, horizontally polarizing the radio can reduce your signal by seven times.

36 In-Building Considerations Stay close to windows if possible Some windows have coverings with metal properties that can attenuate your signal so the doorway may be better. Use the radio in the direct mode to improve comm. to the command post if it is close by. Consider withdrawal if communications is lost. Consider portable “yagi” antenna w/ HT

37 Out of Building Considerations Keep away from large obstructions if possible Consider direct mode or relays if necessary Use portable repeaters if necessary to improve communications

38 Portable Repeater Extends range of USAR operations up to 30 miles or more Fully field programmable without a computer In-band & cross-band

39 Portable Repeater DTMF remote control DC remote for extended wired operation Solar, Battery & Ac operation

40 Portable Repeater Antenna System 20’ minimum height to base of VHF TX/RX antenna Min. 5’ spacing from VHF and UHF RX dipole antenna Min. 15’ spacing between UHF RX & TX antennas

41 Mobile Radio DC operation Magnetic mount antenna Compatible with our repeaters and hand- held radios Will work as a back- up radio for our repeaters Field Programmable w/o a computer

42 Trans-mobile Satellite Telephone Self contained battery, AC or DC operation Works in a moving vehicle with auto- tracking dome antenna Telephone & talk- group capable

43 Transportable Satellite Telephone Self contained battery, AC or DC operation For fixed station/transportable use Cannot work in a moving vehicle

44 Questions & Answers The only dumb question is the one that is not asked!


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