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POSTER TEMPLATE BY: www.PosterPresentations.com One Year Plan – A Fully Implemented RTI Program by December 2012 Brian Schimel HHES Impact and Choices.

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Presentation on theme: "POSTER TEMPLATE BY: www.PosterPresentations.com One Year Plan – A Fully Implemented RTI Program by December 2012 Brian Schimel HHES Impact and Choices."— Presentation transcript:

1 POSTER TEMPLATE BY: One Year Plan – A Fully Implemented RTI Program by December 2012 Brian Schimel HHES Impact and Choices Research Introduction RTI System MTI Screening Form Common Vocabulary at HHES The most comprehensive meta-analysis on interventions for children was conducted by Swanson, Hoskyn, and Lee (1999), who reviewed and analyzed 180 intervention studies over a 30 year period. Their findings suggested moderate to high effect sizes for interventions in small group settings (.86). Waned and Vaughn (2007), synthesized studies of extensive reading interventions and most studies reported effect sizes in the moderate to large range. The effect sizes were larger if the study (a) involved students in kindergarten and first grade as opposed to grades 2-5, (b) used comprehensive reading programs, and (c) delivered the interventions one on one or in small groups. Burns and Appleton (2005), considered the relationship RTI and systemic student achievement outcomes in a meta- analysis of 24 studies. Results of their research found interventions to have a range of effect sizes from.18 to 6.71 with 1.49 as the mean size. General conclusions from this meta-analysis included sites implementing RTI demonstrated both improved systemic and student outcomes. On average, less than 2% of the student population was identified as learning disabled. National Center on Response to Intervention HHES MTI Grade Level 100 Percent Meetings (after each benchmark assessment) What is the overall strength of our CORE program? Classroom teachers bring class wide data (CORE, Easy CBM, OAKS, other) Principal brings PBIS data (attendance, behavior, OAKS) Data teams goal setting form will be used during meeting. Grade Level Twenty Percent Meetings (During PLC): Classroom teachers identify struggling students and list concerns on “MTI Skills Group Intervention and Planning Form” (Page 31 HHES MTI Manual – bring to meeting) Meetings occur on a rotational basis every six weeks Multiple sources of data points are used including Easy CBM, CORE, behavioral, attendance etc. Team will identify three students who will be referred to CST meeting. Title One teacher is responsible for meeting agenda and facilitation. CST meeting will occur the next Tuesday after the Twenty Percent Meeting. Classroom Teachers send out a parent letter informing them of upcoming CST meeting. Parents must have the opportunity to be in attendance. Child Study Team Meeting (Individual Problem Solving) Teachers bring data to the meeting including prescribed interventions, behavior plan, etc. Classroom teacher performs a “file review” before this meeting Counselor has contacted the parents for a Developmental History before meeting. Title 1 teacher performs a classroom observation. With the 2004 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2002, many Response to Intervention Programs (RTI) have been enacted across the country. Most RTI models emphasize early intervention services and (a) screen all children for academic and behavioral problems, (b) monitor the progress of children at risk for difficulties in these areas, and (c) provide increasingly intense interventions based upon the response to progress monitoring adjustments. Students do not respond to several instructional interventions may be referred to special education services. There are many approaches to the implementation of RTI models. Most approaches originate on with either school-wide efforts to prevent behavioral problems or school-wide efforts to prevent reading difficulties in children. Both models emphasize a team process and protocols for decision making – not specific decision rules for problem solving. Both models have been influenced by public health intervention models which provide increased levels of interventions based upon the patient’s response to treatment. (Fletcher and Vaughn, p.2) References HHES – MTI – Building Plan MTI at HHES Impact: Financial: For the 100 percent meetings I will need 4 days of roving substitutes (3) for a total expense of (4x3x$200) = $2,400. The money will come out of Title 1 funds. Professional development will cost around $1,800 for job embedded development with representatives from ORTI (3 days of 3 roving subs x $200 = $1,800). The financial impact to our school will be minimal as MTI does not require additional resources – it is just a change the “way we do things around here.” Choices - Which data will the instructors bring to the meetings? Interventions – How long (30-60 minutes)? Next Steps: SPED Referral process (tighten), decision rules (tighten), Tier 2 Curriculum (tighten) Field Studies of RTI Programs – Revised. RTI Action Network. Charles Hughes. School-wide Positive Behavior Support and Response to Interventions. RTI Action Network. Sugai, George.www.rtinetwork.org The Essential Components of RTI. The National Center on Response to Intervention.


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