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©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, 2009. Social Networking What does that have to do.

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Presentation on theme: "©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, 2009. Social Networking What does that have to do."— Presentation transcript:

1 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Social Networking What does that have to do with finding me a job?

2 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, What’s in it for me? This exercise will help you: – Learn about social networks – See how social networks are not only found in Facebook – Analyze your own getting-a-job social network – Identify your next social networking steps – Get you a job (duh)!

3 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Definitions A social network is a social structure made of nodes (which are generally individuals or organizations) that that are connected together by ties. Social capital is the resources—such as ideas, information, money, and trust— that you are able to access through your social network.

4 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Social networks are getting rarer… Which makes them more valuable… Nationally, more American’s are bowling than ever before, but individual play has largely supplanted team play (Putnam, 2000) From , the percentage of individuals in businesses who identified a co- worker as a close confidant in their discussion networks declined from 48% to 30% (Kacperczyk, Sanchez-Burks, & Baker, U Michigan working paper 2009)

5 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Weak ties get you a Job Granovetter (1973) studied several hundred white-collar workers in Boston and found they had obtained their current jobs through: – Formal means (ad, agency/placement office, etc.): 18% – Direct application to firm: 19% – Personal contacts: 56% – Other means or No answer: 7% Among those using contacts: – 16% said they saw this contact often (2+ times weekly). – 56% saw this contact occasionally (less than twice weekly, more than once yearly). – 28% saw this contact rarely (once a year or less). “Weak Ties”

6 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Before moving on to the survey… Comrade – Trusted member of your professional network that is closest to you and who can speak honestly about your goals. This circle of individuals is usually around 7. Colleague – Member of your inner ring of up to 150 people. Contact – Your entire network (essentially the phone book or your Facebook clan!) Source:

7 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, From your survey You learned about the size, density, and diversity of your network comprised of some combination of comrades and colleagues Bigger is not better unless density is moderate (between.25 and.50), and diversity is high The percentage of network members who are not very close or distant are your weak ties Weak ties create the most job-finding value when your network density is low and diversity is high

8 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Generic Characteristics SIZE DENSITY

9 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Networks, Hunters, & Farmers Hunters are focused and very selective; they stalk few opportunities—only the ones that they think will be just right for them—and effectively leverage their professional networks. Farmers are seed-sowers; they cover a lot of ground, exploring a larger number of opportunities and place more value on broad, rather than qualitative, searches.

10 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Are you a hunter or a farmer? Source:

11 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, THE HUNTERS!

12 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, What to do next? Build your network – Learn to hunt Read (or reread) Chapter 9: Social Networks in Carpenter, Bauer, and Erdogan (Principles of Management) Take a survey – this free job readiness evaluator at UpMo (UPwardly MObile) is a great start Read more: – Carpenter, M.A. An executive’s primer on the strategy of social networks. NY: Business Expert Press – Baker, W. Achieving success through social capital. SF: Jossey-Bass. 2000

13 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, Thank you! "Worry not that no one knows you, seek to be worth knowing.“ Confucius

14 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, 2009.

15 ©m.carpenter/for use with Carpenter, Bauer, & Erdogan, Principles of Management, Flat World Knowledge, From Malcolm Gladwell’s Tipping Point (pp ). Go through this random list of names and give yourself 1 point for everyone you know with a given last name. For instance, if you know three Johnsons, you get three points. What is your total? Out of 400 people, Gladwell found 5% scored below 20, 3% over 90, 1% over 100, and a range of (2-95 in a sample of college students).


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