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Presented by Dr. Teri Hamlin Georgia Department of Education The appearance of a properly pruned plant is like a good hair cut: hardly noticeable at first.

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Presentation on theme: "Presented by Dr. Teri Hamlin Georgia Department of Education The appearance of a properly pruned plant is like a good hair cut: hardly noticeable at first."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presented by Dr. Teri Hamlin Georgia Department of Education The appearance of a properly pruned plant is like a good hair cut: hardly noticeable at first glance. Landscape Pruning Trees

2 Pruning Pruning at Planting: If quality plant stock, pruning is not necessary Do not prune to compensate for root loss latest research show pruning does not help overcome transplant shock

3 Why Prune Removal of dead, broken, diseased, or insect-infested branches Maintain desired shape & size (make it look natural) Promote healthy vigorous growth Promote flowering & fruiting Allow air and light to enter the interior of the plant.

4 Pruning Tools Sharp & Sterile

5 Pruning Tools Hand Shears: branches up to ½” in diameter Lopping Shears: branches ½ to 1 ½” in diameter Pruning Saw: branches larger than 1 ½” in diamter Chain Saw: branches larger than 3” Pole Pruner: long-handled pruner to reach into canopy w/o a ladder. (power pole pruner) Hedge Shears: hedges and other shrubs up to ½” in diameter Grass shears: 2 blades designed to cut grass around edges of walks or flower beds.

6 Making the Cut Directional Pruning- cuts should be about ¼ in above bud or beyond branch collar

7 Making the Cut

8 Pruning Technique Heading Removes a part of a shoot Thinning Removes the entire shoot or limb

9 Pruning Technique Thinning Selectively cutting oldest branches to ground opens center and promotes new growth

10 Pruning Technique Heading Use for small leaf hedges Creates dense, tight foliage

11 Rejuvenating/Renewal Restore overgrown shrubs Cut all branches 4-8” above ground If there are any diseased or dead plants you should remove them first.

12 Crown Thinning No more than one-fourth of the living branches should be removed at one time

13 Crown Raising Remove branch from bottom to provide clearance After pruning the ratio of living crown to total tree height should be at least two-thirds

14 Crown Reduction Ratio of live crown to total tree height should be at least two-thirds Never cut main branches of tree back to stubs (Topping Trees)

15 Pruning Young Tree A. Remove suckers B. Low Growing Branches interfere w/maintenance practices C. Upright growing shoots or waterspouts D. Inward growing branches E. Branches that compete with a central leader

16 Large Limbs A. Make partial cut from underneath B. Make a second cut from above several inches out allows the limb to fall C. Complete job with final cut just outside the branch collar

17 Pruning Limbs An Improper Cut made through the branch collar will take 3x longer to heal

18 Pruning Time General Rule Trees & Plants that flower before May –Prune after bloom Dogwood, Redbud, Saucer Magnolia, Flowering Cherry Azalea, Forsythia, Rhododendron, Clematis, Climbing roses Trees & Plants that flower after May –Prune prior to spring growth Chaste Tree, Crape Myrtle, Sourwood Camellia, Nandina, Sweetshrub, Abelia, Floribunda roses

19 North Carolina Pruning Time January - March Broadleaf evergreen Needleaf evergreen Renewal Pruning Large Tree Limbs

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21 Pruning Paint Correct Tools Correct Time Correct Technique “Placebo” - making the user feel good Research shows that paint or wound dressings do not stop decay nor cause the wound to close faster Successful Pruning

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26 What To Prune? On your Pruning Worksheet put a line through the parts of the tree or shrub that you feel should be pruned and tell why. Mark in pencil so you can make corrections if needed.

27 Plant #1: Create a central leader on this young plant.

28 Plant #2: Allow plant to have a higher canopy

29 Plant #3: Open the Canopy


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