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1. Lower-Income Workers for Local Jobs VISION Long-term, educated, economically self- sufficient workforce with skills needed by area employers GOALS.

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Presentation on theme: "1. Lower-Income Workers for Local Jobs VISION Long-term, educated, economically self- sufficient workforce with skills needed by area employers GOALS."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Lower-Income Workers for Local Jobs VISION Long-term, educated, economically self- sufficient workforce with skills needed by area employers GOALS  Increased financial stability for workers  Stronger talent pipeline for employers  Enhanced workforce system for all 2 Community Chest of New Britain and Berlin The Nutmeg Foundation

3 Many Players, Many Activities 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

4 WSCMH Target: Energy/Utilities  Encouraged by Northeast Utilities – Expecting significant number of retirements – Build workforce pipelines in their urban communities  Anticipated an increase in job openings – Aging workforce – New investments in system infrastructure  Good career pathways to family sustaining wages 4

5 Market Analysis StrengthsWeaknessesOpportunitiesThreats 2,392 jobs in the utility sector in the region 7% higher average annual wages Anticipated job growth Willingness of employers to provide technical training to “job ready” workers Practice of employers “poaching” qualified entry- level workers from other companies Highly regulated Relatively small pool of employers Existing initiatives such as the Hartford Jobs Funnel Multiple and varied funding available Multiple industries Job candidates lack of basic skills Low scores on pre-employment tests Lack of commonly understood definition of “green” A lot activity 5

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7 Job Examples  Electrical and electronics repairer – Inspects, tests, repairs, and/or maintains electrical equipment in generating stations, substations, and in-service relays – $59,988 average annual wages  Electrical power-line installers and repairer – Installs or repairs cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems – $52,103 average annual wages 7

8 Many Players, Many Activities 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

9 Connecticut Energy Workforce Development Consortium  Affiliate of the Center for Energy Workforce Development Center for Energy Workforce Development  Business, education, and government  A skilled workforce for traditional, renewable, and energy-efficiency energy businesses  Staffed by CBIA’s Education Foundation 9

10 Connecticut was included in a $3.9M federal grant to develop a Northeastern “Green Job Bank”, a clearing house for careers and training in environmental technologies. Many Players, Many Activities 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Connecticut’s Governor M. Jodi Rell made an executive order to establish guidelines to train and develop the state’s green collar workforce and created the Green Collar Jobs Council, a public-private labor and education consortium. Connecticut received $3.4M in federal funds to help train and educate the state’s “green collar” workforce for careers in emerging renewable and clean energy industries. Connecticut received $65M in federal funds to help lower-income families reduce energy costs and train workers for the expanded Weatherization Assistance Program.

11 Connecticut was included in a $3.9M federal grant to develop a Northeastern “Green Job Bank”, a clearing house for careers and training in environmental technologies. Many Players, Many Activities 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Connecticut’s Governor M. Jodi Rell made an executive order to establish guidelines to train and develop the state’s green collar workforce and created the Green Collar Jobs Council, a public-private labor and education consortium. Connecticut received $3.4M in federal funds to help train and educate the state’s “green collar” workforce for careers in emerging renewable and clean energy industries. Connecticut received $65M in federal funds to help lower-income families reduce energy costs and train workers for the expanded Weatherization Assistance Program.

12 Energy/Utilities Workforce Partnership  Initially formed in partnership with CTEWDC  Focuses on entry-level workforce needs and lower-income workers  Convened, organized, and managed by CBIA’s Education Foundation  Maintains at least 25% employer membership  Meets quarterly 12

13 Strategies for Building Connecticut’s Energy Career Pipeline: Creating Pathways for the Entry-Level Worker  Career pathways and entry-level employment opportunities  Surveyed more than 100 employers and 30 training providers 13 JobsHiringTrainingOther Blurry line between green and traditional occupations Uneven growth in the sector Employers can’t find qualified workers for job openings Employers rely on temporary workers Employers prefer on-the-job training Mismatch between training and employer needs Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) does not have an energy sector Transportation and child care barriers

14 Connecticut was included in a $3.9M federal grant to develop a Northeastern “Green Job Bank”, a clearing house for careers and training in environmental technologies. Many Players, Many Activities 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Connecticut’s Governor M. Jodi Rell made an executive order to establish guidelines to train and develop the state’s green collar workforce and created the Green Collar Jobs Council, a public-private labor and education consortium. Connecticut received $3.4M in federal funds to help train and educate the state’s “green collar” workforce for careers in emerging renewable and clean energy industries. Connecticut received $65M in federal funds to help lower-income families reduce energy costs and train workers for the expanded Weatherization Assistance Program.

15 WSCMH 1 st Implementation Grant  Energy/Utilities Workforce Partnership/CBIA’s Education Foundation  Goals – Strengthen and expand the workforce partnership – Survey companies, municipalities, and the public sector to define energy-related workforce needs – Providing greater access to worker support services – Build energy career ladders – Promote a learning network for service delivery organizations – Establish credentialed workforce readiness and related skills training – Provide entry-level electric/gas utility training 15

16 Outcomes 16 INDIVIDUAL Total served 24 Credential Attained19 Secure employment/Wage IncreaseTBD Promotion/Increased Responsibilityn/a Sustained EmploymentTBD EMPLOYER Participated in workforce partnerships 15 Received services as part of programs/activitiesn/a Enhanced access to support services at the workplace15 Refined HR policiesTBD Policy recommendationsTBD Increased number of qualified, skilled candidatesTBD Increased number of incumbent workers with the skills needed to meet business needs n/a Other sector-specific benefitsTBD

17 Outcomes 17 INTEGRATIONEFFECTIVENESSSUSTAINABILITY Partnership with the One- Stop system (CTWorks) is with WSCMH and the workforce partnership better integrate WSCMH’s work with the public workforce system, maximize resources, and help to develop the framework of future work Partnership with the WIB and state's DOL in enhancing employer engagement and determining how to collectively honor and leverage relationships with employers to improve value and satisfaction "First of its kind” contextualized, blended developmental education for careers in energy/utilities (traditional, renewable, and alternative) Region’s only known survey and report of energy employers’ entry-level workforce needs Partnership with CT DOL, State Energy Sector Partnership, and the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) to develop career pathways Potential use of ACT’s Work Keys and KeyTrain for programs and services at the regional One-Stops Partner in Developmental Education Collaborative to help identify possible solutions to the development education

18 Connecticut was included in a $3.9M federal grant to develop a Northeastern “Green Job Bank”, a clearing house for careers and training in environmental technologies. Many Players, Many Activities 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Connecticut received $5.8M in federal funds to promote career pathways in the green construction industry for unemployed and underemployed workers. Connecticut’s Governor M. Jodi Rell made an executive order to establish guidelines to train and develop the state’s green collar workforce and created the Green Collar Jobs Council, a public-private labor and education consortium. Connecticut received $3.4M in federal funds to help train and educate the state’s “green collar” workforce for careers in emerging renewable and clean energy industries. Connecticut received $65M in federal funds to help lower-income families reduce energy costs and train workers for the expanded Weatherization Assistance Program.

19 Connecticut was included in a $3.9M federal grant to develop a Northeastern “Green Job Bank”, a clearing house for careers and training in environmental technologies. Many Players, Many Activities 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Connecticut received $5.8M in federal funds to promote career pathways in the green construction industry for unemployed and underemployed workers. Connecticut’s Governor M. Jodi Rell made an executive order to establish guidelines to train and develop the state’s green collar workforce and created the Green Collar Jobs Council, a public-private labor and education consortium. Connecticut received $3.4M in federal funds to help train and educate the state’s “green collar” workforce for careers in emerging renewable and clean energy industries. Connecticut received $65M in federal funds to help lower-income families reduce energy costs and train workers for the expanded Weatherization Assistance Program.

20 WSCMH 2 nd Round of Funding  Energy/Utilities Workforce Partnership/CBIA’s Education Foundation  Facilitate systems change – Build and increase awareness of career ladders/lattices – Increase employer value of credentials – Provide greater access to support services at the workplace – Surface policy issues that impact the delivery of services and/or the career advancement opportunities for individuals  Facilitate career advancement for lower-income workers while meeting the workforce needs of employers 20 Job Seeker/WorkerEmployer Wage increaseIncreased number of incumbent workers with skills and competencies needed to achieve business goals Secure employmentIncreased number of qualified, skilled workers for job openings

21 Targeted Outcomes 21 INDIVIDUAL Total served 95 Credential Attained75 Secure employment/Wage Increase54 Promotion/Increased Responsibility15 Sustained Employment58 EMPLOYER Participated in workforce partnerships 15 Received services as part of programs/activities5 Enhanced access to support services at the workplace15 Refined HR policies10 Policy recommendations10 Increased number of qualified, skilled candidates15 Increased number of incumbent workers with the skills needed to meet business needs 5 Other sector-specific benefits15

22 Lessons Learned  Acknowledge that employers have common but varied issues  Leverage public initiatives and resources  Understand how public policy impacts job demand  Define “green” and determine its impact  Identify and understand “what jobs at what wages” 22

23 Thank You! Kim Oliver Workforce Solutions Collaborative of Metro Hartford koliver@unitedwayinc.org 860.493.6831 23 Thirteen graduates from the Academic Skills Enhancement for Energy-Related Careers training program participated in an electric/gas utility training program.


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