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Introducing the Story Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution TechFocus Reading Skills Focus: Retelling Writing Skills Focus: Think as a Reader/Writer.

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Presentation on theme: "Introducing the Story Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution TechFocus Reading Skills Focus: Retelling Writing Skills Focus: Think as a Reader/Writer."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introducing the Story Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution TechFocus Reading Skills Focus: Retelling Writing Skills Focus: Think as a Reader/Writer Feature Menu The Treasure of Lemon Brown by Walter Dean Myers

2 What things in life are really important? The Treasure of Lemon Brown by Walter Dean Myers

3 Click on the title to start the video. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Introducing the Story

4 Greg dreams of playing basketball for the Scorpions, but his dad has other ideas. Will he learn what’s really important in life? Then, a stormy afternoon in an abandoned building in Harlem teaches Greg a lesson. [End of Section] The Treasure of Lemon Brown Introducing the Story

5 Have you ever argued with a friend or felt guilty about something you did? Then you have experienced conflict. Writers create conflicts to “hook” you into a story. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution Have you ever wanted something very badly but been prevented from getting it?

6 A character may experience conflict during a struggle with another character, with a force of nature, or with his or her own feelings and desires. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution

7 Conflicts may be external: firefighter vs. fire internal: firefighter vs. his or her fear or The Treasure of Lemon Brown Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution

8 He stood to go upstairs, thought of the lecture that probably awaited him if he did anything except shut himself in his room with his math book, and started walking down the street instead.... Pulling his collar up as high as he could, he checked for traffic and made a dash across the street. He reached the house just as another flash of lightning changed the night to day for an instant, then returned the graffiti-scarred building to the grim shadows. “The Treasure of Lemon Brown” by Walter Dean Myers from Boys' Life Magazine, March Copyright © 1983 by Walter Dean Myers. Reproduced by permission of Miriam Altshuler Literary Agency, on behalf of Walter Dean Myers. He stood to go upstairs, thought of the lecture that probably awaited him if he did anything except shut himself in his room with his math book, and started walking down the street instead. [internal conflict]... Pulling his collar up as high as he could, he checked for traffic and made a dash across the street. He reached the house just as another flash of lightning changed the night to day for an instant, then returned the graffiti-scarred building to the grim shadows. [external conflict] “The Treasure of Lemon Brown” by Walter Dean Myers from Boys' Life Magazine, March Copyright © 1983 by Walter Dean Myers. Reproduced by permission of Miriam Altshuler Literary Agency, on behalf of Walter Dean Myers. The story you’re about to read contains several examples of conflict. Here are two: The Treasure of Lemon Brown Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution

9 Most of the conflicts are settled during the course of the story. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Literary Skills Focus: Conflict and Resolution As you read, look for one conflict that remains unresolved at the end of the story. [End of Section]

10 As you read “The Treasure of Lemon Brown,” pay attention to how one character describes music called the “blues.” Make a list of details to research for a short presentation. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Literary Skills Focus TechFocus

11 You can use the strategy called retelling to help you recognize the structural elements of plot as you read. First, you read the story as the author tells it. Then, you tell the story’s events in your own words. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Reading Skills Focus: Retelling

12 Be sure to include major conflicts as you retell the story. Listen to this passage. How would you retell the passage to a friend? Greg is failing math. His father says “no” to basketball. Greg hears breathing in the darkness. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Reading Skills Focus: Retelling A thunderstorm strikes. “The Treasure of Lemon Brown” by Walter Dean Myers from Boys' Life Magazine, March Copyright © 1983 by Walter Dean Myers. Reproduced by permission of Miriam Altshuler Literary Agency, on behalf of Walter Dean Myers.

13 Into Action: As you read the story, questions at the bottom of the pages will ask you about characters’ conflicts and will prompt you to stop and retell main events. Record conflicts and complications in a chart like the one below. [End of Section] Characters The Treasure of Lemon Brown Reading Skills Focus: Retelling Greg Conflicts Complications (Main Events) wants to please his father but has trouble focusing on schoolwork Lemon Brown

14 Find It in Your Reading The Treasure of Lemon Brown Writing Skills Focus: Think as a Reader/Writer Walter Dean Myers uses precise details to portray New York City’s Harlem. As you read, jot down some of the details that help you imagine this urban neighborhood. It was beginning to cool. Gusts of wind made bits of paper dance between the parked cars. There was a flash of lightning, and soon large drops of rain splashed onto his jeans. “The Treasure of Lemon Brown” by Walter Dean Myers from Boys' Life Magazine, March Copyright © 1983 by Walter Dean Myers. Reproduced by permission of Miriam Altshuler Literary Agency, on behalf of Walter Dean Myers. [End of Section]

15 Vocabulary

16 probing v. used as adj.: searching or investigating. intently adv.: with close attention. tentatively adv.: in an uncertain or hesitant way. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary impromptu adj.: unplanned. ominous adj.: threatening.

17 In place of impromptu, you could use words like unprepared, unrehearsed, or spontaneous. The word impromptu is often used to describe unplanned or spur-of-the-moment events. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary

18 BC Which of these activities looks impromptu to you? The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary A Would you pack supplies and outdoor gear for an impromptu adventure? Why or why not?

19 Tentatively is another way to say timidly uncertainly cautiously hesitantlysheepishly shyly The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary

20 Mrs. Martinez tentatively opened the door to the attic because _____________... she was being cautious. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary

21 Intently is another way to say carefully, or with close attention. Valerie looked intently at the mural’s detail. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary

22 Which detective is intently studying the clues? The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary Each detective is.

23 Probing is another term for looking closely, investigating, or digging deeper. Some professions that might include probing are judges scientists reporters medical examiners The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary

24 Antonio most likely... Antonio’s probing hand finally found the light switch. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary A. was in a dark, unfamiliar room. B. knew where the light switch was. C. could easily see the light switch.

25 When you think of the word ominous, what words come to mind? Word: Definition: Image:Sentence: frightening worrying warning menacing Examples: An ominous silence settled over the empty warehouse. ominous adj.: threatening. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary

26 As Mr. Reyna, the theater teacher, hung costumes backstage, an ominous shadow moved into the doorway. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Vocabulary What did Mr. Reyna most likely do next? a.He shrugged his shoulders and kept working. b.He slipped safely out the back door. c.He asked whoever was there to hand him the prop sword and shield. [End of Section]

27 The End

28 QuickWrite

29 Think about something important you would like to teach or tell someone younger than you. What would it be? How would you do it? [End of Section] The Treasure of Lemon Brown QuickWrite

30 Meet the Writer

31 Walter Dean Myers was born in Martinsburg, West Virginia. He was one of eight children. His mother died when he was two. Soon after, his father sent him to live with foster parents in New York City. The Dean family guided him through the rough times of youth and taught him to appreciate storytelling and education. The Treasure of Lemon Brown Meet the Writer More about the writer [End of Section]

32 Build Background

33 The Treasure of Lemon Brown This story is set in Harlem, a neighborhood in New York City. After World War I, Harlem was the center of an African American literary explosion, the Harlem Renaissance. Harlem was home to many important writers, such as Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston.

34 Build Background The Treasure of Lemon Brown Over time, Harlem experienced a decline when many of the buildings fell into disrepair. A new wave of development in recent years has restored Harlem to a vibrant and thriving scene. [End of Section]

35 Preview the Selection

36 In this story, you’ll meet a boy named Greg, who learns some life lessons from a person he meets in an unlikely place. The Treasure of Lemon Brown [End of Section]


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