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The Value of Aviation Internship Programs Louis A. Scala Department of Aviation Farmingdale State University of New York.

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Presentation on theme: "The Value of Aviation Internship Programs Louis A. Scala Department of Aviation Farmingdale State University of New York."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Value of Aviation Internship Programs Louis A. Scala Department of Aviation Farmingdale State University of New York

2 Introduction/Welcome Louis A. Scala  Associate Professor.  Department of Aviation.  Farmingdale, State University of New York.

3 Objective of Today’s Program We want you to leave today’s session with some basic knowledge about:  Aviation related internships.  The advantages of aviation related internships.  Sources of interns and  Partnerships and/or assistance available to develop an internship program.

4 Objective of Today’s Program We also want you to hear some success stories about aviation internships consider implementing an internship program at your airport.

5 Lou Scala’s Story: Aviation High School. SUNY Farmingdale—Aerospace Technology New York University. College of Aeronautics.  AMT Instructor.

6 Lou Scala’s Story SUNY Farmingdale  Assistant Professor Aircraft Systems Aircraft Powerplants My transition in the Brave New World of Airports!  Diamond Jim Brady’s daughter. “My daddy works at JFK.”  The birth of “field trip learning in the classroom.” (Waldvogel)

7 Lou Scala’s Story Academic Leave (1999)  AAAE ASOS class at JFK…meeting Steve Quilty and his advice! Technical Knowledge and Practical Experience is essential.

8 Lou Scala’s Story Steve Quility influenced the development of the BS Degree in Airport Management at Farmingdale, State University of New York.

9 Lou Scala’s Story Professor Scala’s mentors:  Bill DeGraff.  Guilermo Felix.  Ken Kroll.  Hugh Jones.  Stephen Williams.  Warren Kroppell  Bob Junge.  Al Graser.

10 Lou Scala’s Story Professor Scala’s mentors:  Pam Phillips  Tom Felix  Jen Dermody  Daisy Mather  Al Werner.  Evelyn Martinez.  Vincent Cimino (Honorable Obi Wan! ).

11 Lou Scala’s Story BS Degree in Airport Management:  Liberal Arts and Science.  Business Management.  Aviation Core Courses.  Airport Management Courses. Internships Needed! Goal:  AAAE C.M. Certification for FSUNY Grads

12 Internship—Success Stories Evelyn Martinez  Dowling College  Mentor Pam Phillips  PANYNJ Intern  Mentor—Vince Cimino  Intern FAA Airports Division  Presently working with FAA Airports Division as a ACSI and Compliance Officer.

13 Internship—Success Stories Louis Lorate  Vaughn College  Mentor—Vince Cimino  Intern FAA Airports Division  Presently working with FAA Washington ADO as a Community Planner

14 Internship—Success Stories Courtney Liedler  SUNY Farmingdale  Mentor—Vince Cimino  Intern FAA Airports Division  Presently working with the NTSB as an Accident Investigator

15 Internship—Success Stories Mahendra Raghubeer  Vaughn College  Mentor—Vince Cimino  Intern FAA Airports Division  Presently working with FAA NYADO as a Community Planner

16 Internship—Success Stories Ryan Heeralall  SUNY Farmingdale  Mentor—Vince Cimino.  Intern FAA Airports Division  Presently working with FAA contractor and is assigned to the FAA Eastern Region Runway Safety Program.

17 Internship—Success Stories Shedrock Neil  SUNY Farmingdale  Mentor—Vince Cimino.  Intern FAA Airports Division  Presently working with Delta Airlines at LGA

18 Internship—Success Stories Monica Romero  SUNY Farmingdale  Mentor—John Lauth  Presently working with AvPorts FRG Financial/Administration Department.

19 Internship—Success Stories Michael Simon  SUNY Farmingdale  Mentor—Bill L./John Lauth  Presently working with AvPorts FRG as an Airport Operations Coordinator.

20 Internship—Success Stories Shawn Byers  SUNY Farmingdale  Mentor—Vince Cimino.  Intern FAA Airports Division  Presently working with AvPorts FRG as an Airport Operations Coordinator.  Presently working as an Operations Supervisor at BWI/TM airport.

21 Internship—Success Stories Khern Forde  Vaughn College  Presently an Airport Operations Coordinator at Teterboro Airport, NJ.

22 Internship—Success Stories Michelle Grasso  SUNY Farmingdale  Mentor—Vince Cimino  Intern FAA Airports Division  Former Operations Coordinator at Westchester County Airport.  Presently FAA Airports Division Airport Safety Certification Assistant.

23 Internship—Success Stories Joanna Zyskowska  SUNY Farmingdale  Vaughn College  Mentor—Vince Cimino  Intern at FAA Airports Division.  Terminal 4 Operations Coordinator  Presently Airport Operations Coordinator Westchester County Airport, NY

24 Internship—Success Stories Arianne Reyes  Vaughn College  Mentor—Vince Cimino  Intern at FAA Airports Division.  Presently an Airport Operations Coordinator at Teterboro Airport, NJ.

25 Internship 101 An internship is a learning opportunity for a student to explore a career. It is usually a temporary situation. Some internships are paid and others are offered for credit. (Long Island Works Coalition)

26 Internship 101 Internships are designed to teach students how to combine theory and applicable skills to solve complex problems. (Sikorsky)

27 Internship 101 An internship is typically a one-time work or service experience done by a student who has attained at least some academic preparation in a professional field.

28 Internship 101 The student:  Can be an advanced undergraduate or graduate student  Works in a professional setting under the supervision of at least one practicing professional…Many offer pay, but quite a few don’t.  Most are done for academic credit. (JobWeb.com, National Association of Colleges and Universities)

29 Internship 101 “Historically the intern or apprentice, included those wishing to develop skills which would provide a lifelong profession by apprenticing themselves to a “master craftsman.” (Sikorsky)

30 Internship 101 In order to become skilled at a particular trade…an individual would work side by side with a more experienced professional who was willing to take the time to teach his specialty in a “hands on” fashion. Such apprenticeships…continue to this very day. (Sikorsky)

31 Internship 101 Examples of internships and apprenticeships:  Construction and building trades (Journeyman to Master).  Medical profession (Internship to Residency).  Legal profession (Clerkship).  Graduate studies (Fellowships).

32 Internship 101 Many of the best colleges in the U.S. have concluded that internship training is vital for students to become experts in their respective course of study. (Sikorsky)

33 Internship 101—Co-ops A cooperative education experience is generally completed by a student over more than one semester. It includes work assignments related to the participant’s academic and career interests. Co-op students are almost always paid, and their work is considered productive to the employer.

34 Internship 101—Co-ops The typical program plan is for students to alternate terms of full-time classroom study with terms are full-time, discipline-related employment. Most co-op programs involve some sort of academic credit. (JobWeb.com)

35 Internship 101—Practicum A practicum is generally a one-time work or service experience done by a student as a part of an academic class.  “Virtual Internships in Airport Operations Management” for AVN 470 and APM 485 Classes. Some practicums offer pay, but many don’t. Almost all are done for academic credit. (JobWeb.com)

36 Internship 101—Externships or Job Shadowing Experiences An externship or job shadowing experience allows a student to spend between a day and several weeks observing a professional on the job (i.e. Shadowing ACSI Vince Cimino). Such experiences are unpaid, however some colleges and universities pick up travel and/or living expenses.

37 Internship 101—Externships or Job Shadowing Experiences Externships and job shadowing experiences are generally not done for academic credit. (JobWeb.com)

38 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Interns usually have a strong desire to learn. Internships provide:  Job experience for the student.  Networking opportunities.  A “taste and see” potential employee evaluation opportunity for the organization. (Long Island Works)

39 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships In an article entitled, Internship Programs: A Win-Win Business Opportunity. Katherine Rupp, Marketing Manager for the LI Works Coalition, observed several advantages:  Shared Value.  Staff Support.  Name Recognition.  Saves Employment Costs.  Good for the Economy.

40 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Shared Value:  An internship is a short term work experience which emphases hands on and professional development for the student.  In return for this learning experience, students provide assistance to their host organizations by completing tasks and projects of real business value.  Internships can be paid or unpaid.

41 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Staff Support:  Internship benefit’s your organization  Provides your organization with talented and trained assistance without adding to your headcount, and allows for better utilization of full- time personnel.  Interns can perform professional and paraprofessional duties: Short term projects. Contribute to long term projects and staff support.

42 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Name Recognition:  Helps to generate a positive community image FAA summer program for high school students. Summer of Aviation at Republic (SOAR).  Internship program can increase the name recognition of the airport and provide a means for forging bonds with local schools and colleges.  This form of community involvement demonstrates an interest in the future of local students and the local economy by promoting workforce readiness.

43 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Saves Employment Costs:  Gives businesses a chance to evaluate potential employees while they are still in school: Charles Seliga, Stewart International Airport.  Employers offer full-time employment to 56.9% of their interns (National Association of Colleges and Employers).  This lowers the recruitment and training costs.

44 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Saves Employment Costs:  Internships are a useful recruitment tool.  They give an employer/supervisor the opportunity to train and interact with the intern on a regular basis, providing them with a much clearer picture of the potential employee than an interview would.  Gives the intern a realistic picture of the potential working environment before accepting a position, cutting down on turnover. (Rupp)

45 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Good for the Economy:  Internships give students a professional edge by providing them with real business experience while they are still in school.  Internship programs also strengthen the future workforce by increasing the number of available workers with the professionalism and skills businesses look for.

46 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Good for the Economy:  Skilled successful professionals strengthen both the organization they work for through productivity and the community in which they live through financial assets gained from their careers.  Note: The “Multiplier Effect.”

47 Internship 101—Advantages of Internships Interns are useful computer savvy individuals. Interns are usually highly motivated and eager to start gaining valuable work experience. Internships provide career guidance to the intern and networking opportunities between the students and airport professionals.

48 Internship 101—Disadvantages of Internships Internships are not for everyone. It takes a student who is willing to put in the time and an airport that has a need to put an aspiring airport professional to productive use. (Hopper)

49 Internship 101—Getting Started Many schools and college career centers can provide specific information a business needs to host one of there interns. Educational institutions often have programs requirements in place for students if the internships are for credit. (Rupp)

50 Internship 101—Getting Started Businesses can request interns directly or from a school or visit websites of organizations that offer assistance. (Rupp)

51 Internship 101—Getting Started Size does not matter because:  A successful internship program can be of great benefit to both the organization and the student/students it hosts.  In a small airport an intern can be of assistance by wearing many hats, and learning the skill of “multitasking.”  A larger airport may assign an intern to a special department or project, which offers the opportunity for the student to learn a specific skill. (Rupp)

52 Internship 101—Internship Management In an article entited, Educating Interns Will in Turn Produce Assets, Patricia Kitchen pointed out that:  The internship is a learning experience for the student so it is going to take time for the employer to explain the “lingo”, the procedures, and the etiquette of your organization.  Direct interns to the “natural born mentor” types.  Remember that the intern may be a future employee, especially with potential laborer shortage.

53 Internship 101—Internship Management In an article entitled, Educating Interns Will in Turn Produce Assets, Patricia Kitchen pointed out that:  Interns bring fresh thinking to the organization  Internship involves “homework” on your part such as mentoring reports to the College, paperwork etc…  Wear the interns “shoes” and remember that there is a first time for everything and “teach em the ropes.”

54 Internship 101—Internship Resources FAA Eastern Region  FAA High School Outreach Program and emulate it…also  FAA Airports Division has experience with local College students. AAAE  Academic Relations Committee Chair, Bill Hopper  NECAAAE  Scholarships, Internships Grants Chair, William Smith A.A.E, Morristown, NJ

55 Internship 101—Internship Resources University Aviation Association  UAA Northeast Members:  Naugatuck Valley Community College, Waterbury, CT  Wilmington College, New Castle, Delaware  Community College of Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland  University of Maryland, Princess Anne, Maryland  Bridgewater State College, Bridgewater, Mass

56 Internship 101—Internship Resources University Aviation Association Northeast Members:  North Shore Community College, Danvers, Mass  Daniel Webster College, Nashua, NH  Mercer Community College, Trenton, NJ  St, Francis College, Brooklyn, NY  Farmingdale, State University of New York, Farmingdale, New York

57 Internship 101—Internship Resources University Aviation Association Northeast Members:  Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology, Flushing, New York  Dowling College, Oakdale, New York  Schenectady Community College, Schenectady, New York  York College, Jamaica, New York  Lehigh Carbon Valley Community College, Allentown, PA

58 Internship 101—Internship Resources University Aviation Association Northeast Members:  Community College of Beaver County, Beaver falls, PA  Averett College, Danville, VA  Hampton University, Hampton, VA  Fairmont State College, Bridgeport West Virginia Local Community Colleges Local High Schools

59 Thank You!!!! Louis A. Scala Associate Professor Department of Aviation Farmingdale State University of New York 2350 Broadhollow Road Farmingdale, New York fax


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