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Learn more about sexual harassment and how you can help prevent it.

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Presentation on theme: "Learn more about sexual harassment and how you can help prevent it."— Presentation transcript:

1 Learn more about sexual harassment and how you can help prevent it.

2 Sexual Harassment is… Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual’s employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment. Sexual harassment can occur in a variety of circumstances, including but not limited to the following: 0 The victim as well as the harasser may be a woman or a man. The victim does not have to be of the opposite sex. 0 The harasser can be the victim’s supervisor, professor, an agent of the employer, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or a non-employee. 0 The victim does not have to be the person harassed but could be anyone affected by the offensive conduct. 0 Unlawful sexual harassment may occur without economic injury to or discharge of the victim. 0 The harasser’s conduct must be unwelcome. 0 The following are examples of direct and subtle forms of sexual harassment:

3 Examples of Sexual Harassment DirectSubtle VerbalPhysicalNon-Verbal  Terms of address such as “honey,” “baby,” “chick,” “hunk,” or “dear”  Sexual jokes and innuendos  Whistling, cat calls, leering  Sexual comments about a person’s body, clothes, looks, anatomy, manner of walking  Turning work discussions to sexual topics  Asking about sexual fantasies, preferences or histories  Repeatedly asking out a person who is not interested  Making kissing sounds, howling, smacking lips  Telling lies or spreading rumors about a person’s sex life  Explicit descriptions of the harasser’s own sexual experiences  Giving a neck or shoulder massage  Touching a person’s hair, clothing or body  Brushing up against a person  Touching or rubbing oneself sexually around another person  Explicit offers of sex for advancement, grades, money or other rewards  Physical or sexual assault, including rape  Staring at an individual or focusing upon a particular area of the body  Elevator eyes…looking someone up and down  Regularly offering personal gifts such as flowers, candy, etc.  Display of suggestive objects or pictures  Pressure for intimacy or private “personal” discussions  Blocking a person’s path or standing close  Making sexual gestures with hands or through body movements  Making facial expressions such as winking, flowing kisses or licking lips  Unsolicited and unwelcome flirtations  Notes/articles in a mailbox or

4 Handling Sexual Harassment If you feel you are being harassed: It is helpful to inform the harasser directly that the conduct is unwelcome and must stop. If you are unwilling or unable to do so, you may contact a supervisor or the Human Resources Office to ask for help. Employee complaints of sexual harassment may be reported to the Director of Human Resources or the Vice President for Administration and Finance. If you are a supervisor and someone reports to you that he/she is being harassed: You are responsible for making sure the harassment stops. Your options include reporting the harassment to your supervisor or the Director of Human Resources or the Vice President for Administration and Finance. If someone reports harassment to you and you fail to take action or follow the proper reporting options, you may be held liable in a court of law for your failure to do so. If a student complains to you about sexual harassment or what “sounds like” sexual harassment: You are responsible for making sure the harassment stops by either reporting the harassment to the Vice President of Student Life/Dean of Students or the Director of Human Resources. Never promise someone that you will keep what they tell you a secret. You may promise that the matter will be kept as confidential as possible.

5 We are all responsible. 0 Maryville University has a zero tolerance policy for sexual harassment. 0 Please sign and return a copy of this page to the Human Resources Office acknowledging that you understand the University’s sexual harassment policy. If you have any questions or need more information5, please contact Jackie Plunkett at Ext Thank you. ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________ Printed Name ____________________ Date


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