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PDE Phase II Principal Effectiveness Cristine Wagner-Deitch Dr. Eric Rosendale Region 9 1.

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Presentation on theme: "PDE Phase II Principal Effectiveness Cristine Wagner-Deitch Dr. Eric Rosendale Region 9 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 PDE Phase II Principal Effectiveness Cristine Wagner-Deitch Dr. Eric Rosendale Region 9 1

2 Learning Intentions Participants will… Understand that principal evaluation is an informative process – not an isolated event. Become familiar with the process and tools associated with Phase II. Utilize the Principal Effectiveness Rubric to create methods and practices that align to district/school efforts toward increased teacher effectiveness and student achievement. Begin to develop a district/school plan which builds capacity around the Principal Effectiveness Rubric. Region 9 2

3 Today’s Agenda… Overview and Rationale for the Project Establishing a Common Definition of Principal Effectiveness Focus on an Evidence-Based System Differentiation of Evaluative Processes The Role of Principal Growth The Importance of Transparency Systems Planning and Reflection 3 Region 9

4 What to Expect This training will be: a chance to reflect on principal effectiveness. a way to make connections between teacher & principal effectiveness frameworks. an opportunity to examine current system based on “best practice.” This training will not be: simply about compliance. a session focused only on how to “fill out the forms.” about providing the “right” answers. 4 Region 9

5 Setting Norms for Our Group Please… Participate and ask questions. Understand that there are unknowns. 5 Region 9

6 Training Materials Section 1: Powerpoint Slides Section 2: Training Materials Section 3: Research Documents Section 4: Rubrics 6 Region 9

7 7 P roject Goal To develop an educator effectiveness model that will reform the way we evaluate school professionals as well as examine the critical components of training and professional growth. The term “educator” includes teachers, education specialists, and principals. “The term “principal” shall include a building principal, an assistant principal, a vice principal or a director of vocational education.” ~HB 1901 Region 9

8 Definition of Terms Effectiveness: “Effective principals are those who boost academic achievement for all students, increase the effectiveness of their teaching staffs, and consistently take leadership actions shown to improve outcomes for students” (Reeves, 2010). Supervision: Collegial, focused on growth, ongoing, formative Evaluation: Requires summative judgment, based on evidence 8 Region 9

9 Opening Activity: What’s Your System? What is your current principal evaluation process? Use the worksheet to list the steps in your system. organize your list using your school calendar. Reflect: How does your current system advance your district goals and promote principal growth? 9 Region 9 TM pg. 2

10 10 Principal Effectiveness: Setting the Stage Region 9

11 Educator Effectiveness Overview Where we are in Teacher Effectiveness – Phase III Principal Effectiveness – Phase II Specialist Effectiveness – Phase I Anticipated Statewide Implementation Teacher Effectiveness – Principal Effectiveness – Specialist Effectiveness – Region 9

12 Principal Effectiveness Why Important and Why Now? Effective school leadership has an impact on developing a culture focused on student achievement. However as stated by Douglas Reeves from the Leadership and Learning Center: “Most leadership assessments are infrequent, late, unhelpful and largely a source of administrative bother.” Given the efforts taking place with teacher effectiveness, this becomes an opportune time for Pennsylvania to also develop its first universal instrument for principal effectiveness. 12 Region 9

13 Principal Effectiveness Why Important and Why Now? (continued) As the Commonwealth continues its work with the establishment of universal effectiveness instruments, it is essential that building and system leaders have initial and on-going training to guarantee sustainability and reliability. story/executive-video/Pages/default.aspx story/executive-video/Pages/default.aspx 13 Region 9

14 Our Approach Review of Previous Work Reviewed existing state models from North Carolina, Delaware, Washington, Tennessee, and Colorado Analyzed elements of the various models from the following perspectives: The nine PA School Leadership Standards; Specifically the Core & Corollary Leadership Standards as mandated by Act 45 of 2007 The leader’s role in improving student achievement The desire for measureable and constructive feedback to staff Conducted an extensive review of research linked to principal effectiveness. MET Project RAND Wallace Calder 14 Region 9

15 Our Approach Review of Research Highlights from the Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) Report: Principals have the greatest indirect impact on student learning. An emphasis is needed for evaluators to be accredited and reaccredited after a set period of time to prevent rater drift. Having multiple observers helps to validate the growth, improvement, and evaluation process. Resource: 15 Region 9

16 Our Approach Review of Research (continued) Highlights from the April 2010 Policy Brief, Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER): More effective principals are able to staff schools with more effective teachers Experience is a predictor of principal effectiveness The principal's job is complex; Effectiveness depends on sense of efficacy on tasks and how time is allocated for tasks Principal evaluations of teachers can offer valuable feedback on teacher performance, as opposed to student test scores alone Resource: 16 Region 9

17 Our Approach Engaging Stakeholders and Expertise Educational experts from national, state, and locals levels provided reviews of various work throughout the process. On June 18, 2012 Pennsylvania conducted its first statewide stakeholder meeting, which included representation from LEAs of various sizes and locations. 17 Region 9

18 Our Approach Incorporating Act 82 of 2012 Within Act 82, new requirements for Educator Effectiveness have been defined for teachers, principals, and education specialists. Within Act 82 Within the Act, it defines various categories that need to be addressed within principal evaluation systems: Planning and Preparation School Environment Delivery of Service Professional Development 18 Region 9

19 Observation/ Evidence Domains 1.Strategic/ Cultural Leadership 2.Systems Leadership 3.Leadership for Learning 4.Professional and Community Leadership Building Level Data PSSA Achievement PVAAS Growth Graduation Rate Promotion Rate AP Course Participation SAT/PSAT Principal Effectiveness System 19 Correlation PVAAS Elective Data/SLOs District Designed National Tests District Rubrics IEP Growth Projects Portfolios Surveys PDE Standards for Review And Approval Region 9

20 Principal Effectiveness Instrument Creation of a Framework Combing all the background previously identified, a draft framework was developed that establishes a set of four leadership domains: Domain 1: Strategic/Cultural Leadership Domain 2: Systems Leadership Domain 3: Leadership for Learning Domain 4: Professional and Community Leadership The framework contains specific components (with corresponding descriptors) to be included in each of the four domains. 20 Region 9

21 Principal Effectiveness Instrument: Alignment with Act 82 and PIL Program 21 Forms pg. 14 Region 9

22 PA CORE Standards The leader … has the knowledge and skills to think and plan strategically, creating an organizational vision around personalized student success. is grounded in standards-based systems theory and design and is able to transfer that knowledge to his/her job as the architect of standards-based reform in the school. knows how to access and use appropriate data to inform decision-making at all levels of the system. 22 Region 9

23 Corollary Standards The Leader… creates a culture of teaching and learning with an emphasis on learning. manages resources for effective results. collaborates, communicates, engages, and empowers others inside and outside of the organization to pursue excellence in learning. operates in a fair and equitable manner with personal and professional dignity. advocates for children and public education in the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context. supports professional growth of self and others through practice and inquiry. 23 Region 9

24 Principal Effectiveness Why Important and Why Now? (continued) As the Commonwealth continues its work with the establishment of universal effectiveness instruments, it is essential that building and system leaders have initial and on-going training to guarantee sustainability and reliability. 24 Region 9

25 Phase II Requirements Both the central office supervisor AND the principal(s) collect and share evidence for 3-5 components on the rubric. One must fall under “Leadership for Learning.” Supervisor submits results of collaborative assessment(s) using levels of performance for the 3-5 components chosen. Supervisor and principal(s) provide feedback on the rubric and the process. 25 Region 9

26 Why Evaluate Principals? Quality Assurance Professional Learning 26 Region 9

27 5 “Best Practices” for Principal Evaluation 1)Common definition 2)Focus on evidence 3)Differentiation of evaluative processes 4)Role of principal in their own growth 5)Transparency 27 Region 9

28 5 “Best Practices” for Principal Evaluation 1)Common definition 2)Focus on evidence 3)Differentiation of evaluative processes 4)Role of principal in their own growth 5)Transparency 28 Region 9

29 Best Practice #1: Common Definition Start with a common definition of principal effectiveness that is studied, and understood, by all stakeholders. 29 Region 9

30 Best Practice #2: Evidence Let evidence, not opinion, anchor the process. 30 Region 9

31 Characteristics of Principal Effectiveness What do you view as the five most important characteristics/behaviors of effective principals? TM pg Region 9

32 Group Consensus Compile a list of characteristics and behaviors and indicate top three with most impact on student learning. 32 Region 9

33 State of the Research: Article Review and Discussion Guiding Question: How do OUR perceptions of principal effectiveness match with the research literature? State of the Research (Choose One) The Principal as Leader: Guiding Schools to Better Teaching and Learning (Wallace Foundation) First Year Principals in Urban Districts: How Actions and Working Conditions Relate to Outcomes, Summary Document (Rand Corp) 33 Research Region 9

34 State of the Research: Article Review and Discussion Highlight at least three key ideas that you’d like to discuss at your tables as you read. When everyone is finished, discuss the key points everyone highlighted. Bring your discussion to closure by examining the characteristics on chart paper and discussing the following question: How do OUR perceptions of principal effectiveness compare with the research literature? 34 TM Pg. 4 Region 9

35 Principal Effectiveness Review of Research (continued) Highlights from the Wallace Foundation Report: “The School Principal as Leader” include the following competencies for effective school leaders: Share a vision of academic success for all students Create a climate hospitable to education Cultivate leadership in others Improve instruction Manage people, data, and processes to foster school improvement Resource: leadership/Documents/The-School-Principal-as-Leader-Guiding-Schools-to-Better-Teaching- and-Learning.pdf 35 Region 9

36 Principal Effectiveness Review of Research (continued) Highlights from the RAND Corporation Report: “First Year Principals in Urban School Districts”: The report provided an analysis of the relationship between first year principals and achievement within urban school districts. Results showed that when a principal leaves, student achievement suffers 2-3 years. Resource: TR1191.pdf 36 Region 9

37 The Domains 1)Strategic/Cultural Leadership 2)Systems Leadership 3)Leadership for Learning 4)Professional and Community Leadership 37 Region 9

38 Review: Evidence or Opinion? 1.Principal Jones’ teachers all seem to feel positive about the direction that he is taking them to improve student academic outcomes. 2.Faculty meeting agendas and handouts list safety policies and procedures. 3.Building data teams held regularly scheduled meetings to develop proficiency plans for at-risk students, using specific protocols. 4.Principal Rogers has difficulty with completing evaluation reports within the required timeline. 5.Principal Sally states, “I have involved teachers in planning professional development.” 38 Region 9

39 Exploring the Domains 39 Region 9 Characteristics Connections to Teacher Effectiveness Evidence of Proficient Evidence of Distinguished Domain TM pg. 5 Forms T & P Rubric

40 PA’s Principal Effectiveness Framework 40 Region 9

41 How to Make the Process Formative and Informative Refer back to your district evaluation system & discuss: Where does the principal rubric “fit”? How might you enhance your process through evidence collection? What barriers exist, and how might you address them? How can you be sure that your principal has met a goal? 41 TM pg. 2 Region 9

42 Connecting the Frameworks, Domains, and Components Framework for Teaching 4 Domains 22 Components Levels of Performance Research-based Focused on professional growth Promotes positive impact on student learning Distinguished extends beyond “self” PA Principal Effectiveness Framework 4 Domains 19 Components Levels of Performance Design incorporates current research Focused on professional growth Promotes positive impact on student learning Distinguished extends beyond “self” 42 Region 9

43 5 “Best Practices” for Principal Evaluation 1)Common definition 2)Focus on evidence 3)Differentiation of evaluative processes 4)Role of principal growth 5)Transparency 43 Region 9

44 Best Practice #3: Differentiation of process How do you differentiate the principal evaluation process? by building goals? based on principal’s level of experience? 44 Region 9

45 5 “Best Practices” for Principal Evaluation 1)Common definition 2)Focus on evidence 3)Differentiation of evaluative processes 4)Role of principal in their own growth 5)Transparency 45 Region 9

46 Best Practice #4: Role of the Principal in Their Own Growth Who does the thinking? Who does the learning? 46 Region 9

47 Remember the teacher effectiveness process… What would the principal effectiveness process look like? 47 Pre- Observation Observation Preparing for Post- Observation conference Post- Conference Collaborative Assessment Walk- through TM pg Region 9

48 PDE Phase II Process Principal’s self-assessment Together, supervisor and principal choose 3-5 components on the rubric for Phase II Review and embed principal effectiveness framework in current district evaluation process Beginning of Phase II meeting with supervisor and principal to set goals (January 2013) and map out evidence that will be collected and used throughout Phase II to measure effectiveness. Supervisor and principal meet midway to provide feedback, grounding conversation in the principal framework and the evidence collected so far (March 2013). Adjust goals and/or evidence list, if needed. Supervisor and principal meet at EOY (June 2013) to discuss evidence collected and determine levels of performance for selected components. Data submission to PDE (Deadline: June 30, 2013) 48 Region 9

49 Principal Growth Use Danielson’s Framework for Teaching process to create a similar process for principals. Suggestions include: Principals use rubrics and highlighters to self-assess their effectiveness. Principals use data to set priorities based on component in the rubric. Both supervisor and principal gather and share supporting evidence. (On-going) Supervisors use highlighted rubrics to identify areas of agreement (based on evidence). Supervisor and principal collaboratively assess the principal’s effectiveness for individual components 49 Region 9

50 Systems Approach to Principal Effectiveness: How do you link individual principal’s building goals to district goals? What’s the timing of the principal evaluation process given that data should be a valuable part of the goal-setting process? How frequently do you meet with the principal throughout the year to discuss and provide feedback on components of the rubric? 50 Training Pg. 8 Region 9

51 5 “Best Practices” for Principal Evaluation 1)Common definition 2)Focus on evidence 3)Differentiation of evaluative processes 4)Role of principal in their own growth 5)Transparency 51 Region 9

52 Best Practice #5: Transparency Principals must learn the rubrics and the process. 52 Region 9

53 How will your principal effectiveness system facilitate on-going, two-way communication and feedback? 53 A lack of transparency results in distrust and a deep sense of insecurity. ~Dalai Lama Region 9

54 District Planning for Phase II and Beyond… 54 Region 9

55 Reflect on Your Plan Is your process grounded in research? Do principals’ goals align to the principal effectiveness rubric? Is your process collaborative? Does the principal play a leading and active role? Is it evidence-based? What evidence will be acceptable? Who will collect evidence? When will evidence be collected? 55 TM pg. 8 Region 9

56 Reflect on Your Plan Is the process likely to promote growth? Can you expect an impact (direct and indirect) on teacher effectiveness? Student achievement? How will you know? What is the timeline for use and implementation through June 30, 2013? What is your timeline for future years? 56 story/executive-video/Pages/default.aspx TM pg. 8 Region 9

57 Learning Intentions Participants will… Understand that principal evaluation is an informative process – not an isolated event. Become familiar with the process and tools associated with Phase II. Utilize the Principal Effectiveness Rubric to create methods and practices that align to district/school efforts toward increased teacher effectiveness and student achievement. Begin to develop a district/school plan which builds capacity around the Principal Effectiveness Rubric. 57 Region 9

58 Today’s Training Developed by: 58 Region 9

59 Cristine Wagner-Deitch Dr. Eric Rosendale Contact Information Region 9 59


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