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© Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 1 The Role of the Mid-Day Supervisor This course is suitable for welfare assistants and members.

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Presentation on theme: "© Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 1 The Role of the Mid-Day Supervisor This course is suitable for welfare assistants and members."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 1 The Role of the Mid-Day Supervisor This course is suitable for welfare assistants and members of mid-day supervisory teams. This course acts as a helpful introduction the course "Effective Induction for Mid-day supervisory teams". Experience from past courses suggests that it is particularly helpful for the full team, and/or for the mid-day team leader accompanied by newly appointed staff. Participants will consider the role of the mid-day supervisor and look at different ways of managing and relating to children in order to enhance relationships and increase confidence and skills. By the end of the session, participants will * have explore the links between the course materials, the Five Outcomes and safeguarding children * be able to describe the content and boundaries of their roles * have a working knowledge of positive discipline, e.g. positive praise; encouraging co-operation; giving clear, courteous, assertive commands; setting fair, firm limits; utilising available resources * be able to describe and apply strategies for managing children’s misbehaviour, e.g. applying consistent consequences to misbehaviour; planning playground supervision; gain new ideas for playground game Course Introduction:

2 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 2 The Role of the Midday Supervisor 1 Introductions.... Your trainer Do you know each other?

3 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 3 Skills Active Overview: Access Training is accredited by SkillsActive and has signed up to its national Code of Practice SkillsActive “quality assure” the training. This training may be useful, or even count towards, other qualifications, such as NVQs.

4 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 4 Objectives We will consider the role of the mid-day supervisor and look at different ways of managing and relating to children in order to enhance relationships and increase confidence and skills. By the end of the session, we will: be able to describe the content and boundaries of the role have a working knowledge of positive discipline, e.g. positive praise; encouraging co-operation; giving clear, courteous, assertive commands; setting fair, firm limits; utilising available resources be able to describe and apply strategies for managing children’s misbehaviour, e.g. applying consistent consequences to misbehaviour; planning playground supervision; Note: Handling bullying is one role too big to consider today: We have a further course on this. 3

5 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 5 The Five Outcomes: –be healthy –stay safe –enjoy and achieve –make a positive contribution –achieve economic well-being. Safeguarding Children How does this course support The National Picture?

6 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 6 Role – or Job Description? What does your Job Description say? What is the job REALLY about? 5

7 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 7 Introductory exercise What are your duties and responsibilities? What are others’ duties and responsibilities? What things enable you to carry out your duties and responsibilities? What things hinder you in carrying out your duties and responsibilities? What skills and experience do you bring to this job? 6

8 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 8 Introductory exercise Answers from previous courses: What are your duties and responsibilities? –Safety, social skills, first aid, self-help skills, managing behaviour, create enjoyment. Looking after the children. Hygiene. Count them (the runners), Be proactive and head off trouble. What are others’ duties and responsibilities? –Team Leader – Decision maker. What things enable you to carry out your duties and responsibilities? –Consistency, rewards, play activities and resources, team work, confidence, positive relationships, knowing the children (Communication), rota What things hinder you in carrying out your duties and responsibilities? –Weather, puddles, challenging behaviours What skills and experience do you bring to this job? –Child management, Caring, kind, parent, polite, patience, role model, listening skills, training (e.g. first aid, behaviour) 7

9 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 9 A Possible Role for a Mid Day Supervisor: To enable children to arrive safely at afternoon session rested, exercised, relaxed, comfortable and fed, feeling secure, with increased social skills, ready to learn. What do we need to achieve this? What does YOUR school say your role is? What are your limits? 8

10 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 10 What do we need? A good knowledge: of the children of the school’s routines, rules and ethos of behaviour management of how to keep the children who need it purposefully active of the strengths and weaknesses of your team PLUS: A confidence that there is support from the whole staff and a whole –school approach to breaktimes, behaviour management, rewards, sanctions, anti- bullying measures 9

11 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 11 A Possible Title for a Mid Day Supervisor: Director of Mid-Day Education? Personal Development Tutor? Health and Safety Officer Police Officer 10

12 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 12 Some key areas Confidentiality Teamwork Consistency Preparation & Training Discipline & Pupil Management Behaviour, ABC & factual reporting Short & long term strategies

13 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 13 A Cautionary tale: What do we understand about “Confidentiality”  Who needs to know what, about whom?  What should YOU be told?  Who should YOU tell things to?  What are the implications of a “breach of confidentiality”? 11

14 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 14 Team Work & Consistency support one another communicate with one another to ensure consistency co-ordinate playground supervision agree clear strategies to be followed review what is working, what needs action celebrate your successes: Become an EXCELLENT team 1.46

15 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 15 Preparation & Training Preparing for wet breaks Planning for changes to routines Training for new staff (“Induction”) On-going training Briefings (SEN, behaviour issues, school policies/routines)

16 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 16 Discipline & Pupil Management Positive Behaviour Management Praise Rewards Sanctions Giving instructions

17 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 17 What is Positive Discipline? Positive Behaviour –Modelling positive behaviour –Management –praise –rewards –limit-setting –instructions and commands Encouragement in self-management Teaching child to see another’s point of view (which may be different to their own) 46

18 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 18 Why have Positive Discipline? Builds self esteem Better atmosphere Enables success Reinforces rules Draws attention to desired behaviour Helps children to be able to learn 50

19 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 19 Positive Discipline: Praise Praise – make someone’s day! –words of praise and encouragement can be very reinforcing –make immediate rewards following the desired behaviour –give labelled and specific praise –use smiles, eye contact, enthusiasm –show child how to praise him/herself for good/positive behaviour –have realistic expectations of difficult children 55

20 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 20 Rewards & Sanctions Choose effective rewards, e.g. report to teacher, ringing bell, special duty Be consistent in which behaviours will receive rewards Check what sanctions are allowed in your school, and for what level of misbehaviour. 58

21 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 21 Instructions and commands Make commands short and clear Give one command at a time Be polite Avoid threats Avoid ‘stop’ commands, ‘do’ commands Use the ‘when-then’ rule Support colleagues’ commands/interventions Encourage child’s problem solving 1.07

22 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 22 Limit-setting Tell the child the desired behaviour clearly, at the beginning of play, lunch etc. Positive discipline is about setting limits Discuss rules with child Discuss feelings with child Give limits and clear consequences Time-out 1.02

23 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 23 Behaviour Why do people misbehave? What can we do about it? How do we observe and report a misbehaviour? What strategies can we use to change behaviours?

24 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 24 Misbehaviour It is fair to assume that there is a reason for every misbehaviour. The trick is to find out what it is and see if there is a remedy Think each incident on two levels: –Short term strategies: Immediate action for each incident –Longer term strategies: Planned action to reduce incidents 1.18

25 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 25 Observations & Recordings to support you and other staff in understanding why a particular behaviour has happened, so that it can either be reinforced or changed ABC report: –A = antecedent what happens before, ie the trigger –B = behaviour (or beliefs) what the child does –C = consequences what happens afterwards 1.10

26 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 26 Short Term Strategies: Think chemical reactions! don’t threaten disciplinary action straightaway give child time to cool down and apologise/take back what they’ve said hear both sides before taking action time out – in playground/removal from playground report system if serious offence – inform parents and possible removal from lunch time break 1.23

27 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 27 Long Term Strategies (1): Agree clear steps for all supervisors to follow in a range of situations(set out in writing) Be used to observing (ABC Chart) Change triggering circumstances (A) Reorganise playground supervision e.g. zones Problem solving & anti-bully whole-school training Praise all efforts at self control Reduce exposure to other aggressive children KEEP THEM BUSY, ACTIVE, HAPPY! 1.28

28 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 28 KEEP THEM BUSY, ACTIVE, HAPPY! Games Equipment Wet and dry playtimes Teach children to be mentors / play mentors Look at your team – include playleaders?

29 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 29 Long Term Strategies (2): Design playtime activity programme e.g. dance, games, parachute, children’s ideas Team work Supporting one another Agree strategies Regular meetings (however brief) Team targets e.g. 5 less ‘time-outs’ in a week Times, layout, deployment of staff 1.33

30 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 30 More ideas “Change of Face” (left ear lobe) Walkie-talkies Scheduled meetings (team, Head) “Sports Coaches” “Captain’s Table” Instruction icon cards 1.50

31 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 31 Reconsider the Role for a Mid Day Supervisor: Director of Mid-Day Education? Play Therapist? Director of physical development? Behavioural Psychologist? Agony Aunt Social Skills Tutor Professional member of the school team 1.53

32 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 32 Headings for Action Plan Name of school Date Priorities for change What might you want to experiment with in order to improve effectiveness? Agreement about any common approaches you are ready to adopt Agreements re: –commitments to any further explorations/piloting of change –identify any support you need How will you track your progress and share experience? Date of review

33 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 33 The Five Outcomes: –be healthy –stay safe –enjoy and achieve –make a positive contribution –achieve economic well-being. Safeguarding Children How can we now better support The National Picture?

34 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 34 Questions & Further Help Access Training: –229 Scraptoft Lane, Leicester LE5 2HT – Tear-off slip at bottom of evaluation form Resources: Handouts- & ideas for further reading

35 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 35 Conclusion YOU ARE IMPORTANT Wave the magic wand and make it happen! ACTION to improve your understanding of your role in school and your effectiveness Evaluation Sheets Certificates Notes, Bibliography, Web Site Action Plans

36 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no: 36 Objectives We will consider the role of the mid-day supervisor and look at different ways of managing and relating to children in order to enhance relationships and increase confidence and skills. By the end of the session, we will: be able to describe the content and boundaries of their roles have a working knowledge of positive discipline, e.g. positive praise; encouraging co-operation; giving clear, courteous, assertive commands; setting fair, firm limits; utilising available resources be able to describe and apply strategies for managing children’s misbehaviour, e.g. applying consistent consequences to misbehaviour; planning playground supervision; developing approaches to bullying 1.58

37 © Rik Ludlow 2010, licensed to Access Training. Slide no:


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