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PERSONAL and PROFESSIONAL NARRATIVES in SUPERVISION: From Supervising to Co-Visioning Practices NARRATIVE THERAPY PRACTICES APPLIED TO SUPERVISION MARC.

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Presentation on theme: "PERSONAL and PROFESSIONAL NARRATIVES in SUPERVISION: From Supervising to Co-Visioning Practices NARRATIVE THERAPY PRACTICES APPLIED TO SUPERVISION MARC."— Presentation transcript:

1 PERSONAL and PROFESSIONAL NARRATIVES in SUPERVISION: From Supervising to Co-Visioning Practices NARRATIVE THERAPY PRACTICES APPLIED TO SUPERVISION MARC CHARNEY, Ph.D., LMFT, LPC 2014

2 ITINERARY INTRODUCTIONS NARRATIVE AND SUPERVISION METAPHORS PRINCIPLES INTO PRACTICE ACTIVITY QUESTIONS FOR EXPLORATION REFLECTION

3 NARRATIVE METAPHORS A NARRATIVE IS LIKE A THREAD THAT WEAVES EVENTS TOGETHER, FORMING A STORY. (Morgan, 2001) AS THERAPISTS AND SUPERVISORS, WE INHABIT BOTH OUR PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL STORIES.

4 WHO WE ARE AS THERAPISTS and SUPERVISORS WE ARE OUR PRACTICES “A PRACTICE..CAN BE DEFINED..(as) A REGULARITY (or regularities) OF BEHAVIOR, USUALLY GOAL-DIRECTED, THAT IS SOCIALLY NORMATIVELY GOVERNED” (May, 2001)

5 OUR PRACTICES OUR SELVES ACCORDING TO MAY, CHARACTERISTICS OF PRACTICES ARE: GOAL-DIRECTED – There is some aim or destination in view SOCIAL NORMATIVE GOVERNANCE – The practice is influenced by social norms or standards. This is the intersection of the individual and social (May, 2001, p. 12)

6 OUR PRACTICES OUR SELVES REGULARITIES – Commonality of behaviors; not necessarily identical but complementary. DISCURSIVE -- Practices involve language; linguistic communication is necessary for coordination and accessibility. PRACTICES INTEGRATE, IN SPECIFIC WAYS, VARIOUS GROUPS OF DISPERSED SKILLS SUCH AS EXPLAINING, READING, DESCRIBING, IMAGINING, AND THE LIKE (May, 2001, p. 20)

7 WE ARE OUR PRACTICES PRACTICES ARE RELATED TO KNOWLEDGE: – KNOWING THAT AND KNOWING HOW. – WHAT A PERSON NEEDS TO KNOW HOW TO DO – – … WHAT CONSTITUTES BETTER AND WORSE KNOW-HOW, IS MOSTLY GIVEN BY THE PRACTICES IN WHICH ONE PARTICIPATES (May, 2001)

8 WE ARE OUR PRACTICES OUR “PRACTICES EMBODY OR AT LEAST EMBRACE DIFFERENT VALUES.” – A VALUE REFERS TO ACTS AND WAYS OF BEING AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES. VALUES ARE SOCIAL RATHER THAN PERSONAL – OUR PRACTICES, OUR ACTS / WAYS OF BEING HAVE VALUE – (May,2001)

9 ACTIVITY PAIR UP AND TAKE TURNS RESPONDING TO THESE QUESTIONS: Just before you meet with a person in therapy/ counseling, what are two ideas you want to be mindful of? What are your intentions for the interaction about to unfold? What are your hopes for the persons who consult you? How do you want the person who is consulting you, to experience themselves in the therapy?

10 NARRATIVE CO-VISION IF THERAPY IS THE RE-AUTHORING OF A PERSON’S IDENTITY STORIES / NARRATIVES, THEN… “SUPERVISION” / “CO-VISION” IS THE PROCESS OF CO-AUTHORING A PROFESSIONAL THERAPIST’S NARRATIVES/STORIES.

11 PREFERRED SUPERVISOR NARRATIVES A preferred narrative reflects the Values, Hopes, Commitments, Intentions, Desires and Principles a person Practices. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR PREFERRED SUPERVISOR NARRATIVES?

12 PREFERRED SUPERVISOR NARRATIVES What values do you want to be present in your supervision? What are your hopes for the supervision experience/ relationship? What are you committed to bringing to the supervision experience? What are some intentions you hope to realize in your supervision experiences? What principles will you embody and express in your work?

13 NARRATIVE MISSION STATEMENT IF YOU WERE TO WRITE A MISSION STATEMENT FOR YOUR PREFERRED SUPERVISION PRACTICE, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

14 PRACTICE METAPHORS WHAT SUPERVISION PRACTICE METAPHORS DO YOU EMBRACE?

15 PRACTICE METAPHORS COMMON PRACTICE METAPHORS NARRATIVE PRACTICE METAPHORS COACHING CO-AUTHORING MENTORING COLLABORATING TEACHER/TRAINER ACCOMPANING ADMINISTRATOR CELEBRATING EVALUATOR GATEKEEPER

16 CO-AUTHORING PRACTICES Deconstruction of personal and professional identity issues. What is important to you as a person and counselor? Why do you value these? How do you perform these values in your work?

17 COLLABORATIVE PRACTICES How can you support the supervisee explore and develop his/her professional identity? What ways of relating with the supervisee will be respectful, supportive, and challenging? How can we co-construct a collaborative relationship that will contribute to your (supervisee’s) ethical development?

18 COMPANION PRACTICES In what ways is my relationship with the supervisee influential, but decentered? (White, 2007) How can I be transparent and provide appropriate scaffolding for the supervisee? (White, 2007) How can I support the supervisee in evaluating their professional development? (White, 2007)

19 CELEBRATORY PRACTICES What are ways to appropriately acknowledge and celebrate the supervisee’s attainment of their new status? What outsider witness practices might be appropriate for acknowledging their change in status? (White,2007)

20 ACTIVITY PAIR UP THE “SUPERVISOR” WILL INTERVIEW THE “SUPERVISEE” 1. TELL ME A STORY ABOUT A SPARKLING MOMENT YOU HAD RECENTLY IN YOUR THERAPY. Introduce the person(s) and describe what it is about them that stands out for you.

21 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION 2. WHAT ASPECTS OF YOUR CLIENT’S STORY ARE YOU MOST DRAWN TO? What themes/plots do you find of interest in the client’s narratives? What caught your attention and imagination? What expressions provided you with a sense of what the person accords value to in life? (White, pp 190)

22 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION 3. WHAT IMAGES OR METAPHORS COME TO YOUR MIND AS YOU LISTEN TO THE CLIENT’S STORIES? What carries personal meaning/significance for you? Images may take the form of metaphors about the person’s life or mental pictures of the person’s identity. What might these metaphors and mental pictures reflect about the person’s purposes, values, hopes, beliefs, dreams, commitments…? (White pp. 190)

23 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION 4. IN WHAT WAYS ARE YOU DRAWN BY THE CLIENT’S EXPRESSIONS AND HOW THEY STRUCK A CHORD WITH YOUR OWN PERSONAL HISTORY. WHAT IN YOUR OWN LIFE RESONATES WITH THE CLIENT’S EXPERIENCES ? (White, pp 191) Briefly describe the client’s issue and any way you are “touched” or “moved” about it personally. How do you resonate to this issue?

24 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION 5. WHERE WERE YOU TRANSPORTED/ MOVED BY LISTENING TO THE CLIENT’S STORY? Where has your experience of this person taken you with regard to your own thoughts, including your reflections on your own existence, your understanding of your own life? Or about conversations with persons in your own life, or about options for actions in your own life ?

25 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION 6. DESCRIBE THE RELATIONSHIP YOU ARE CO- CONSTRUCTING WITH THIS PERSON. How are you wanting to position yourself in this relationship? How can you be an “appreciative ally”? (Madsen)

26 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION 7. WHAT CULTURAL, SOCIETAL, SPIRITUAL AND RELATIONAL NARRATIVES MAY BE INFLUENCING HOW YOU VIEW THE PRESENTING PROBLEM NARRATIVES? HOW MIGHT THESE VIEWS BE DISTINCT FROM YOUR CLIENT’S VIEWS? Taking into account both your client’s and your personal moral, spiritual, religious values regarding the issue, how might these views affect the establishment of goals and or acceptance of preferred narratives/alternative stories?

27 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION 8. WHAT PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL SELF-STORIES MAY BE PRESENTING A CHALLENGE IN WORKING WITH THE CLIENT(S) AROUND THEIR ISSUES? What personal vulnerabilities may be invited into the therapy? 9. HOW ARE YOU USING YOURSELF IN YOUR WORK WITH THIS PERSON? In what ways does your work reflect your therapeutic values and practices? 10. WHAT WAS YOUR EXPERIENCE OF THIS SUPERVISION EXPERIENCE?

28 NARRATIVE SUPERVISION REFLECTION AND DISCUSSION FEEDBACK

29 REFERENCES 1.Aponte, H. & Carlsen, C. (2009). An Instrument for person-of-the-therapist supervision, Journal of Marriage and Family Therapy, 35(4), May, T. (2001). Our practices our selves: Or, what it means to be human, University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press. 3.McKinsie, W. & Monk, G. (1997). Learning and teaching narrative ideas. In Monk, G., Winslade, J. et al. Narrative Therapy in Practice, The Archaeology of Hope. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass 4.Madsen, William (2007).Collaborative Therapy with Multi-Stressed Families; from Old Problems to New futures, 2 nd Ed., NY, Guilford Press 5.Morgan, A. (2001). What is narrative therapy: An easy to read introduction. Adelaide, Australia: Dulwich Centre Publications. 6. White, M. (2007). Maps of narrative practice. NY: W.W. Norton 7. White, M. (1997). Supervision as re-authoring conversation. In Narratives of Therapist’s Lives. Adelaide, Australia: Dulwich Centre Publications.


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