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CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Overview The Supervisor’s Role Obligations and Responsibilities.

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Presentation on theme: "CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Overview The Supervisor’s Role Obligations and Responsibilities."— Presentation transcript:

1 CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Overview The Supervisor’s Role Obligations and Responsibilities Functions of Management Theories of People Management Managerial Skills Tips for New supervisors

2 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved The Supervisor’s Role A supervisor is anyone who manages people who make products and/or perform services. Responsibilities include: The output of the people supervised The quality and quantity of the products and services Meeting the needs of the employees by motivating and stimulating proper job performance. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

3 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure 1.1 The levels of employees in a large company. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

4 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved The Supervisor’s Role An Organizational Chart may be used to show: Relationship among and within departments Staff Functions (advisors) Line Functions (associates directly involved) Lines of Authority (power to make decisions) Lines of Responsibilities (obligations to carry out) CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

5 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure 1.2 Organization chart for a large hotel. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

6 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure 1.3 Organization chart for a large restaurant. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

7 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Types of Supervisors & Employees A Working Supervisor performs tasks of hourly employees. Their focus is on work as well as supervising workers. A First-line supervisor leads and manages hourly employees. Their focus is on supervision. Nonexempt employees are covered by federal and state wage and hour laws. They are hourly employees that are guaranteed minimum wage and overtime (after 40 hours ). Exempt Employees are not covered by federal and state wage and hour laws. This includes supervisors who spend 50% or more of their time managing 2 or more employees, and under federal law when they are paid $455 or more per hour week. (depending on the state). CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

8 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Obligations & Responsibilities of a Supervisor When you begin to supervise the work of other people, you cross a line that separates you from hourly workers – you step over to the management side. How would you describe your past supervisors? What makes a good or bad supervisor? You could take the following supervisor assessment to check on your supervisory skills? CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

9 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure 1.4 Supervisor’s Assessment. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

10 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Obligations & Responsibilities of a Supervisor The Supervisor in the middle has obligations to: Owners Guests Employees CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

11 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure 1.5 The supervisor is right in the middle of everything and everybody. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

12 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Obligations & Responsibilities of a Supervisor Owners: To make their enterprise profitable, and to run things their way (do anything they require that is legal and moral). Guests: Treat them well and they will come back. Repeat business = Continued profit. Employees: If you want production you must provide them with a climate of acceptance, approval, open communication, fairness, and belonging. A poor work climate = a high labor turn over, low productivity, poor quality control, and fewer customers. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

13 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Boomerang Management Boomerang management occurs when a manager reverts from management’s point of view to the employee’s point of view; you’ve got to stay in charge. If you try to manage from the employee’s point of view, they will take advantage of you. Employees really want you to manage them CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

14 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved The Functions of Management Theory The four main functions of management are: 1.Planning 2.Organizing 3.Leading 4.Controlling The flex style of management calls on theory, experience, and talent to adjust actions and decisions to given situations according to the demands of those situations CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

15 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Functions of Management Planning: Looking ahead to chart goals and the best courses of future action. Organizing: Putting together the necessary assets for maximum efficiency to meet the enterprise’s goals. Leading: Interacting and guiding employees accomplishing certain goals and plans. Controlling and Evaluating: Monitoring and evaluating results in terms of goals and standards previously agreed upon. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

16 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure 1.6 The interactions of a supervisor. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

17 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Scientific Management People management theory, which stems from the work of Frederick Taylor. Its goal emphasizes the increase of productivity in factories. It has four features: 1.Standardization of work procedures and methods 2.Careful selection of people 3.Complete and constant supervision 4.Incentive pay In addition to this theory, Frank Gilbreth added the idea of work simplification. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

18 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved The Human Relations Theory An outgrowth of studies made at the Hawthorne plant of Western Electric Co. Focus shifted from work to people: emphasizes the importance of workers as individuals Theory of people management, which states that satisfying the needs of employees is the key to productivity. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

19 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Participative Management Employees participate in decisions that concern them. Employees become more objective and share concerns and objectives of management. “Management by Communication” CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

20 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Total Quality Management A process of total organizational involvement in improving all aspects of the quality of a product or service. Enhances the creative ways in which employees solve guest- related problems. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

21 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Humanistic Management A combination of scientific, human relations, and participative systems Adapted to the needs of the situation, workers, and supervisor. Most beneficial for hotel and foodservice industries. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

22 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Managerial Skills Technical Skills: Ability to know and carry out the tasks of the people you supervise. Human Skills: Ability to handle the people you supervise which includes your attitude, sensitivity, and self awareness. A manager must be sensitive to workers’ personal needs and able to adjust to the situation (flex style of management). Conceptual Skills: Ability to see the whole picture CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

23 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure 1.7 Levels of supervisory skills. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

24 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Personal Skills and Qualities Self management Strong self image Believe in employees Flexibility and creativity High energy levels Able to work under pressure CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

25 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Two Types of Thinkers - Manz Opportunity Thinkers: When faced with a challenge they concentrate on constructive ways to deal with the circumstances. Obstacle Thinker: When faced with a challenge they focus on why the situation is impossible to retreat. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

26 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Decision to Manage When deciding whether to be a manger, you must be should ask yourself: Do you really want it? What is the cost? Is it worth the cost? Having the maturity to decide what you want and to accept the costs may be the most important quality of all. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager

27 Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Tips for New Survivors Start as you mean to continue. Be yourself. Praise the hard work of your team and help them continue to do a good job. Listen and ask questions. Be positive. Know the company’s vision, mission, goals, strategies, philosophy and culture. Know the policies and procedures. Set a good example. CHAPTER 1 The Supervisor as Manager


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