Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

c. University of Michigan 2007 1 Creating an atmosphere of trust Secrets Great Supervisors Use Sally M. Johnson Manager, Building Great Places to Work.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "c. University of Michigan 2007 1 Creating an atmosphere of trust Secrets Great Supervisors Use Sally M. Johnson Manager, Building Great Places to Work."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 c. University of Michigan Creating an atmosphere of trust Secrets Great Supervisors Use Sally M. Johnson Manager, Building Great Places to Work The University of Michigan VOICES Conference for Managers & Supervisors May 22, 2007

3 c. University of Michigan In the last two decades Research and surveys about work Have made one fact more and more clear: The single strongest influence On workplace performance and satisfaction…

4 c. University of Michigan …Is my relationship with my supervisor.

5 c. University of Michigan Whose research and surveys? Among others…. The Great Place to Work Institute, The Gallup Organization, The Corporate Leadership Council, Towers-Perrin Consulting, The Conference Board

6 c. University of Michigan Great Place to Work Institute® The Institute chooses Fortune Magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” The Institute chooses Fortune Magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” Their research says: the secret is trust: Their research says: the secret is trust: –Do I believe my supervisor trusts me? –Do I trust my supervisor to be honest with me? See

7 c. University of Michigan Gallup Foundation surveys asked, What separates great performers from all the rest? 1. I know what is expected of me. 2. My boss seems to care about me as a person. 3. My supervisor encourages my development. 4. My opinions seem to count. See First Break All the Rules, by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman. Simon & Schuster, Great performers said this about their supervisors:

8 c. University of Michigan Corporate Leadership Council year-long research project, 2004 Significant findings: Significant findings: –Most important to top-performing staff: I know, and my supervisor knows, how my work supports the mission of the organization –Of the top 25 “drivers” of top performance, supervisors control 19. Driving Performance and Retention through Employee Engagement © 2004 Corporate Executive Board, Corporate Leadership Council

9 c. University of Michigan Towers-Perrin’s survey research Employees do their best work when they have the following – things only the supervisor can give: Employees do their best work when they have the following – things only the supervisor can give: –Challenging work –Decision-making authority over my job –Collaborative work environment –Input into departmental decisions The 2003 Towers-Perrin Talent Report

10 c. University of Michigan The Conference Board Q: How can an organization engage the “massive middle”? A: Give people a “good boss!” 2006 Conferences: “Employee Engagement: What is Everyone Really Talking About?”

11 c. University of Michigan So, what’s a “good boss”? School of Dentistry staff said their “great bosses:” School of Dentistry staff said their “great bosses:” “Cared about me as a person” “Cared about me as a person” “Knew and used my strengths” “Knew and used my strengths” “Knew the organization & the goals of our work” “Knew the organization & the goals of our work” “Helped me grow professionally” “Helped me grow professionally”

12 c. University of Michigan Plus random campus interviews: “my best boss - - “ Saw us all as being “all alike and human.” Saw us all as being “all alike and human.” Gave me access to training. Gave me access to training. Supported my career growth. Supported my career growth. Cared about me. Cared about me. Treated me with respect. Treated me with respect. Noticed what I did right. Noticed what I did right. Trusted me – didn’t have to check up on me. Trusted me – didn’t have to check up on me. Increased my responsibilities. Increased my responsibilities.

13 c. University of Michigan Secrets great supervisors use “Show up.” …Ann Richards, Governor, Texas “Show up.” …Ann Richards, Governor, Texas Manage yourself. Manage yourself. Care about them. Care about them. “Encourage the heart.” …Kouzes & Posner, Ldrship Challenge “Encourage the heart.” …Kouzes & Posner, Ldrship Challenge Communicate upward. Communicate upward. Communicate change. Communicate change. Model & coach conflict resolution. Model & coach conflict resolution. Handle performance respectfully. Handle performance respectfully. Trust them. Trust them.

14 c. University of Michigan Show up. Being their supervisor: your first priority. Being their supervisor: your first priority. Your job: to make it possible for them to do their jobs. Your job: to make it possible for them to do their jobs. Be where your team is, some time every day. Be where your team is, some time every day. Always available for work-related questions. Always available for work-related questions. Frequently available for informal chatting. Frequently available for informal chatting. –(NOT for lengthy recitals of personal problems!)

15 c. University of Michigan Manage yourself. Be vulnerable; be real. Be vulnerable; be real. Be adult to their adult. Be adult to their adult. Let your authority be assumed, not flaunted. Let your authority be assumed, not flaunted. Acknowledge mistakes; apologize. Acknowledge mistakes; apologize. Acknowledge: their right to disagree with you. Acknowledge: their right to disagree with you. –Your need to know, and how you can hear it. –Their right to go elsewhere for help.

16 c. University of Michigan Care about them. Focus on each unique individual. Focus on each unique individual. Most frequent description of best boss: “He/she cared about me as a person.” Most frequent description of best boss: “He/she cared about me as a person.” –Aware I had a personal life –Flexible as needed. –Wanted me to succeed. –Treated me with respect.

17 c. University of Michigan Care about them. Care about my career. Care about my career. –Give me feedback –Listen to my aspirations. –Help me build a career plan. Notice what I do for you: acknowledge and appreciate. Notice what I do for you: acknowledge and appreciate. Keep focus on what I do for the University: build a “line of sight.” Keep focus on what I do for the University: build a “line of sight.”

18 c. University of Michigan Encourage the heart. Painting the picture: the significance of what we do; its importance to others. Painting the picture: the significance of what we do; its importance to others. Team cheerleader – Team cheerleader – –How great we are at what we do. –Celebrations. Regular TEAM meetings. Regular TEAM meetings. –Make them fun. –Multi-directional communication. –Show up! You’re needed.

19 c. University of Michigan Encourage the heart. Credit where credit is due. Credit where credit is due. –Use their names and tell the world. –Tell them whom you told. “Make everyone an insider.” “Make everyone an insider.” –Share the big picture. –Share the discussions/rationale behind decisions. –Help them understand the organization. Tell the truth. Tell the truth. –Share as much information as you have as soon as you have it.

20 c. University of Michigan Encourage the heart Have team-developed norms. Have team-developed norms. Examples: Examples: –“Interpersonal problems happen, can be solved.” “Keep them private.” “Keep them private.” “Address only with the other person.” “Address only with the other person.” Supervisor’s role: advice on how to approach. Supervisor’s role: advice on how to approach. –“Stamp out gossip.” –“Disagreement is healthy.” “Don’t pretend to agree when you disagree.” “Don’t pretend to agree when you disagree.” “Put disagreement on the table. We’ll all learn.” “Put disagreement on the table. We’ll all learn.”

21 c. University of Michigan Encourage the heart Notice and appreciate Notice and appreciate “Grow” the habit, & reward yourself for doing it. “Grow” the habit, & reward yourself for doing it. Thank-you notes Thank-you notes Small “prizes” Small “prizes” –Favorite candy bars –A single flower –Department T-shirts or caps –Gift certificates Find ways to include everyone (not just “stars”) Find ways to include everyone (not just “stars”)

22 c. University of Michigan Communicate upward. “Speak truth to power:” advocate for your team, carry their concerns upward. “Speak truth to power:” advocate for your team, carry their concerns upward. Take team members to management meetings; send them in your place. Take team members to management meetings; send them in your place. Keep management informed about team’s Keep management informed about team’s –Hard work, productivity, success –Ideas, suggestions, innovations –Needs, frustrations, concerns

23 c. University of Michigan Step 1: Inform. “Here’s a change that’s coming. Step 1: Inform. “Here’s a change that’s coming. Do this early, early, early. Do this early, early, early. –“Here are the advantages management expects, the reasons for doing it. –“Here’s our part……. –“Questions about effect on you? –“Here is the timetable as well as I know it. –“Are you with me so far?” Communicate change: a step- by-step script

24 c. University of Michigan Communicate change: a step-by-step script Be prepared: “grief cycle” (denial-anger- bargaining-depression-acceptance) Be prepared: “grief cycle” (denial-anger- bargaining-depression-acceptance) Step 2: Venting (denial, anger) “OK, we need all the gripes out on the table!” Step 2: Venting (denial, anger) “OK, we need all the gripes out on the table!” –Blowing steam is essential. –No-holds-barred, private brainstorm: just for us. –Have fun with it. –Encourage it. “Are you sure that’s all? Don’t be shy!”

25 c. University of Michigan Communicate change: a step- by-step script Step 3: Bargaining/depression: Staff say: Step 3: Bargaining/depression: Staff say: –“We won’t be able to do it.” –“Tell ‘them’ it’s a bad decision.” –“Make it go away.” You say: You say: –“Unfortunately, not our choice. A done deal.” –Do they need more time to discuss reasons why? –Do they need more time to vent?

26 c. University of Michigan Communicate change: a step- by-step script Step 4: Depression/acceptance: Step 4: Depression/acceptance: –“What questions would you like answered? –“what suggestions could make the outcome better? –“What suggestions could make transition easier?” Step 5: Discuss questions & suggestions with management. Step 5: Discuss questions & suggestions with management. –Push for changes that seem important & feasible. –Keep communication flowing both ways.

27 c. University of Michigan Communicate change: a step- by-step script Step 6: Acceptance: “What do we need to do to be ready?” Step 6: Acceptance: “What do we need to do to be ready?” –Resources? –Moral support? –Rewards? Be accessible for individual concerns or anxiety. Be accessible for individual concerns or anxiety.

28 c. University of Michigan Model & coach conflict resolution Refresh your own c.r. skills. Refresh your own c.r. skills. –Model positive, interest-based c.r. –Teach staff skills to resolve conflict directly. –Don’t do it for them! Someone complains to you about coworker? Someone complains to you about coworker? –“I trust you to resolve this yourself. –“It’s hard for anyone at any level. –“Do you want to talk about how to approach it?” Re-emphasize confidentiality; no gossip. Re-emphasize confidentiality; no gossip.

29 c. University of Michigan Model & coach conflict resolution Avoid individual meetings with you. Avoid individual meetings with you. –Increases distrust between staff members. –Builds false expectations: you’ll decide in their favor, you’ll “fix” the problem for them. Three-way meeting? Three-way meeting? –What role will you play? Can you be neutral? –Can you skillfully facilitate their listening to each other?

30 c. University of Michigan Model & coach conflict resolution Don’t arbitrate! Don’t arbitrate! –You become “the judge;” resentment increases. Reward success Reward success –“Looks like you two worked things out well.” –“Thanks. Not usually easy.” –Thank-you note; copy to file?

31 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. STOP. THINK. Is it me? STOP. THINK. Is it me? Jumping to conclusion: frequent, easy, natural. Jumping to conclusion: frequent, easy, natural. Reasons we jump to conclusions: Reasons we jump to conclusions: –You don’t like or trust the person. Picture a person you like doing the same thing. Does it still seem like “performance issue?” Picture a person you like doing the same thing. Does it still seem like “performance issue?” Are you in a “cycle of mistrust”? Are you in a “cycle of mistrust”?

32 c. University of Michigan Breaking a “cycle of distrust:” Identify the assumptions you made. Identify the assumptions you made. Check out those assumptions. Check out those assumptions. Risk #1: Open up a candid, vulnerable talk. Risk #1: Open up a candid, vulnerable talk. –It occurred to me we might be misjudging each other. –I made some assumptions…. –What about you? Risk #2: Let’s give it another shot. How can we keep communication open? Risk #2: Let’s give it another shot. How can we keep communication open?

33 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. More reasons we jump to conclusions: More reasons we jump to conclusions: –We impose irrelevant personal values. Example: I think “People should be quiet at work.” Example: I think “People should be quiet at work.” Some staff laugh out loud, call across the room. Some staff laugh out loud, call across the room. But: other than my preference, what’s wrong with it? But: other than my preference, what’s wrong with it? –We think someone is “challenging our authority.” A common symptom of “supervisory paranoia.” A common symptom of “supervisory paranoia.” And anyway, so what if they are? Let ‘em. And anyway, so what if they are? Let ‘em.

34 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. Still think it’s a performance concern? Still think it’s a performance concern? –Respect your colleague as an adult. –Talk to them before you talk to anyone else (even HR?) –Do this early – don’t wait. –Listen to what staff member says. –What did you hear that you didn’t know before? –Does that make a difference?

35 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. Still think the staff member needs to change something? Still think the staff member needs to change something? –Talk together: what’s needed? How does it differ from what happened? –Make it mutual. Are your expectations of each other now clear? –In “performance management,” this is “setting clear expectations” (not discipline.)

36 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. Protect staff members’ confidentiality Protect staff members’ confidentiality –Suspecting conversations about you without your knowledge: a MAJOR trust-destroyer: –“Need to know” principle: keep the circle small; usually, only you and the staff member. –Tell me: who else knows about this?

37 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. Truly need HR advice? Try this: Truly need HR advice? Try this: –Tell staff member, “This behavior is troubling me.” –“I need an HR perspective.” –Maybe they’d like to go with you. Why not? –Maybe they’ll get the point just hearing this, agree to work with you to change behavior, save you a trip.

38 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. One or two repetitions? One or two repetitions? –Ask –Remind Persistent repetition? Persistent repetition? –Q: “Need something in writing as a reminder? An actual reprimand? Yeah, it’s that important….”

39 c. University of Michigan Handle performance respectfully. Attendance? Not the main issue. Attendance? Not the main issue. Private talk: Private talk: –Importance of person’s work to UM, dept. –Requirements of the work itself. –This person is essential; must depend on them. –What’s non-negotiable? –How can you reward faithful performance?

40 c. University of Michigan Finally: Trust them. “Monitor,” “control:” SO twentieth century. “Monitor,” “control:” SO twentieth century. Listen. Listen. Ask for opinions. Incorporate them. Ask for opinions. Incorporate them. Celebrate when they know more than you do. Celebrate when they know more than you do. Use and promote their expertise. Use and promote their expertise. Believe in their desire to succeed. Believe in their desire to succeed. Enjoy having them as your team. Enjoy having them as your team.

41 c. University of Michigan A moment or two for… Questions? Questions? Special situations? Special situations?

42 c. University of Michigan THE END Thanks for your attention! Here’s to you, UM’s great supervisors!


Download ppt "c. University of Michigan 2007 1 Creating an atmosphere of trust Secrets Great Supervisors Use Sally M. Johnson Manager, Building Great Places to Work."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google