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1 SUPERVISOR SAFETY Presented by: Safety Office. 2 AGENDA  RESPONSIBILITIES  PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS  FEDERAL EMPLOYEES COMPENSATION ACT (FECA)  HAZARD.

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Presentation on theme: "1 SUPERVISOR SAFETY Presented by: Safety Office. 2 AGENDA  RESPONSIBILITIES  PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS  FEDERAL EMPLOYEES COMPENSATION ACT (FECA)  HAZARD."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 SUPERVISOR SAFETY Presented by: Safety Office

2 2 AGENDA  RESPONSIBILITIES  PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS  FEDERAL EMPLOYEES COMPENSATION ACT (FECA)  HAZARD ASSESSMENT  HAZARD SCANNING  PRACTICAL EXERCISE  EXAMINATION (What? No one said there would be an examination!

3 3 1. Be responsible for accident prevention to the same extent that they are responsible for production or services. 2. Maintain a safe and healthful workplace. 3. Assure that employees under their supervision observe appropriate safety and occupational health rules and regulations, including the use of protective clothing and equipment [PCE (PPE)] provided for their protection. AR S upervisory and operating personnel who direct or affect the actions of others will Responsibilities

4 4 4. Promptly evaluate and take action as required to correct hazards reported by employees or identified through accident investigation. They will not initiate or support reprisal action against employees who identify hazards, raise safety concerns or engage in authorized safety and occupational health activities. 5. Use the risk management process during the planning, preparation for, and execution of all operations for which they are responsible. AR Responsibilities (cont’d)

5 5 (5) Use of PCE (PPE) by visitors and transients. For all activities in which official visitors and transients may be potentially exposed to hazards, the host, guide, or area supervisor will conduct a risk assessment of the work location to determine the appropriate protective measures. 2.2 Operational procedures AR

6 6 If the host, guide, or area supervisor can reduce the hazard(s) to an acceptable level without requiring the use of PCE (PPE), those measures may be employed (that is, eliminate foot hazards-no safety shoes). However, if it is determined that a safe level of risk cannot be obtained by using these procedures, then the host, guide, or area supervisor will be responsible for providing and assuring the proper use of PCE (PPE) and the official visitors and transients will be required to wear the specified PCE (PPE). 2.2 Operational procedures AR

7 7 SUPERVISOR SAFETY PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

8 8 Authority  AR , paragraph 1-4.o  Supervisory personnel will: –Be responsible for accident prevention –Maintain safe & healthful workplace –Assure employees observe safety rules –Correct hazards –Use the risk management process

9 9 Authority (cont)  29 CFR Subpart B  Employees who exercise supervisory functions shall : –furnish a place of employment free of hazards... –comply with occupational safety and health standards applicable to their agency

10 10 Responsibilities  Job Safety Training  Safety Meetings  Safety Inspections  Accident Reporting  Hazard Reporting and Abatement  Safety Risk Management

11 11 Job Safety Training  Develop a detailed Employee Safety & Health Record  Provide each employee initial training  Provide annual refresher training  Document on Employee Safety & Health Record  Use your ASO or Fire Safety Warden

12 12 Safety Meetings  Intended to provide continuous safety training - Updates  Recommended on a monthly basis as a minimum  May be just a few minutes as part of staff meeting  Valuable whenever equipment/procedures are changed

13 13 Safety Meetings

14 14 Safety Inspections  Monthly inspections are the minimum  Maintain record of inspection  Use checklist tailored to your area  Discrepancies turned in to work order desk  Include tools, equipment, PPE, facilities, and personnel procedures  Make on-the-spot corrections if possible

15 15 Safety Inspections

16 16 Accident Reporting  All on-duty accidents must be reported  Locally developed form recommended  Supervisor initiates, investigates, and tracks  Get treatment for victim  Notify the Safety Office ASAP

17 17 Accident Reporting

18 18 Accident Reporting DA Civilians  Treatment  Local Form (MEDDAC 720)  CA-1 (2 day time constraints to CPAC)  CA-16 for patient’s personal physician  Light-duty assignments for Workmen’s Comp COP

19 19 Accident Reporting Military  Treatment  Local Form (MEDDAC 720)  DA-285 or DA-285-AB-R for lost time accidents  Report all on-duty and off-duty accidents on military personnel

20 20 FECA & OWCP Contact your local FECA & OWCP representative

21 21 RISK MANAGEMENT

22 22 Safety Risk Management (5 Steps)  Identify Hazards  Assess Hazards –Severity –Probability  Develop controls and make risk decisions  Implement controls  Supervise and Evaluate

23 23 1. Identify Hazards  Break the job down into component tasks (Job hazard analysis)  Determine all the potential hazards associated with each task

24 24 What is a Hazard?

25 25 What are hazards? Unsafe Acts  Operating without authority  Failure to secure or store materials properly  Failure to signal or warn  Operating at unsafe speeds  Etc…...

26 26 What are hazards? Unsafe conditions  Lack of training for personnel  Hazardous arrangement of tools, machines, equipment, supplies, etc.  Improper illumination  Unsafe ventilation

27 27 2. Assess the Hazards (Part of the JHA)  Severity - how much damage to the daily mission will result from an occurrence? Ranges from Catastrophic to Negligible  Probability - how likely is an accident from the hazard? Ranges from Frequent to Unlikely  Yields a Risk Assessment Code (1-5)

28 28 Risk Assessment Matrix SEVERITY ACCIDENT PROBABILITY A B C D E I - Catastrophic II – Critical III – Marginal IV - Negligible

29 29 3. Develop Controls/Make Risk Decisions  Engineering controls - eliminate hazard  Education controls - training  Physical controls - barriers, guards, signs  Avoidance - prevent contact with hazard  Make risk decision - choose the control or course of action (COA)

30 30 4. Implement Controls  SOP’s  Training Performance Standards  Operation Orders  Must be converted into clear, simple execution orders understood at all levels

31 31 5. Supervise and Evaluate  Continuous assessment - ensures that subordinates understand  Constant supervision - ensures subordinates are complying with implementation of controls  Enforce standards and controls 1st

32 32 Hazard Reporting  AR Supervisory responsibility  Use DA Forms – Notice of Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Condition - for RAC 1 & 2 - post for 3 days or hazard corrected –4755- Employee Report of Alleged Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Conditions - to safety - may be anonymous - 10 day response

33 33 Hazard Abatement  DA Form Installation Hazard Abatement Plan - used for all uncorrected violations  Updates are required when work cannot be completed as anticipated  Supervisor should track all hazards on the Abatement Plan concerning his/her area

34 34 Conclusion  The entire list of responsibilities may sound rather intimidating. It really isn’t. Most of your responsibilities will become routine.  And don’t forget, the Safety Office is available to assist in accomplishing this important mission - Safety!

35 35 Hazard Assessment

36 36 Why Hazard Assessment?  29 CFR Part Subpart I  Increases Awareness of Workplace Hazards  Provides opportunity to identify and control workplace hazards  Can lead to increased productivity  May prevent an Occupational Injury or Illness

37 37 What is PPE? Equipment worn by an employee that is designed to prevent injury or illness from a specific hazard.

38 38 Before PPE  Administrative Controls –Change Work Practices –Change Hazardous Duties –Cease Hazardous Duties  Engineering Controls –Sound insulation –Guards –Tools

39 39  Working off Ladder  Oil based paint  Sand blasting in booth  Jackhammering  Gloved hand  Working off Scaffold  Water based paint  Sand blasting in cabinet  Hole Ram  Hot Sticks Administrative Changes ! For Example ALTERNATIVEPROCEDURE

40 40 Engineering Controls  Machine Guards  Sound deadening/dampening  Shielding

41 41 Controlling Hazards PPE devices alone should not be relied on to provide protection against hazards, but should be used in conjunction with guards, engineering controls, and sound work practices.

42 42 Assessment and Selection It is necessary to consider certain general guidelines for assessing the foot, head, eye and face, and hand hazard situations that exist in an occupational operation or process, and to match the protective devices to the particular hazard. It is the responsibility of the supervisor to exercise common sense and appropriate expertise to accomplish these tasks.

43 43 Assessment Guidelines. Conduct a walk through survey of the areas in question. The purpose of the survey (or field observation) is to identify sources of hazards to workers and co workers.

44 44 Hazard Sources  sources of MOTION  sources of EXTREME temperatures  types of chemical exposures  sources of harmful dust  sources of light radiation  sources of falling objects or potential for dropping objects  sources of sharp objects  sources or rolling or pinching objects  layout of workplace and location of co workers  any electrical hazards

45 45 In addition.... injury/ accident data should be reviewed to help identify problem areas.

46 46 Organize data Following the walkthrough survey, it is necessary to organize the data and information for use in the assessment of hazards. The objective is to prepare for an analysis of the hazards in the environment to enable proper selection of protective equipment.

47 47 Analyze data  Having gathered and organized data on a workplace, an estimate of the potential for injuries should be made. Each of the basic hazards should be reviewed and a determination made as to the type, level of risk. and seriousness of potential injury from each of the hazards found in the area.  The possibility of exposure to several hazards simultaneously should be considered.

48 48 Selection guidelines  Become familiar with the potential hazards and the type of protective equipment that is available, and what it can do; i.e.., splash protection, impact protection, etc.  Compare the hazards associated with the environment; i.e.., impact velocities, masses, projectile shape, radiation intensities, with the capabilities of the available protective equipment

49 49 Selection guidelines (cont.)  Select the protective equipment which ensures a level of protection greater than the minimum required to protect employees from the hazards.  Fit the user with the protective device and give instructions on care and use of the PPE.

50 50 Selection Note  It is very important that end users be made aware of all warning labels for and limitations of their PPE

51 51 Reassessment of hazards It is the responsibility of the supervisor to reassess the workplace hazard situation as necessary, by identifying and evaluating new equipment and processes, reviewing accident records, and reevaluating the suitability of previously selected PPE

52 52 So how do I Do all This????

53 53 JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS

54 54 Job Safety Analysis The breaking down into its component parts of any method or procedure to determine the hazards connected with each key step and the requirements for performing it safely.

55 55 Job Safety Analysis Priorities  New Jobs  Severity Potential  History of Disabling Injuries  Frequency of Accidents

56 56 Job Safety Analysis  Job means “task”  (Changing a tire not auto mechanic)  “key” steps  too detailed becomes cumbersome  not enough detail becomes useless

57 57 Break job down into key steps AVOID!!  making the breakdown so detailed That an unnecessarily large number of steps results  making the job breakdown so general that basic steps are not recorded

58 58 Key Steps TOO MUCH Changing a Flat Tire  Pull off road  Put car in “park”  Set brake  Activate emergency flashers  Open door  Get out of car  Walk to trunk  Put key in lock  Open trunk  Remove jack  Remove Spare tire

59 59 Key Steps NOT ENOUGH Changing a Flat Tire  Park car  Take off flat tire  Put on spare tire  Drive away

60 60 Key Job Steps JUST RIGHT Changing a Flat tire  Park car, set brake  remove jack & tire from trunk  loosen log nuts  jack up car  remove tire  set new tire  jack down car  tighten lug nuts  store tire & jack

61 61 Hazards  Parking Car –Struck by Traffic  Removing tire & jack –Back Strain –bang head on trunk  Loosen lug nuts –back/arm strain –slip & fall  Jacking up car –car could fall off jack  Setting new tire –fingers pinched –back strain  Tighten nuts –back strain –slip & fall

62 62 Work Observation  Select experienced worker(s) who will cooperate and participate in the JSA process.  Explain purpose of JSA  Observe the employee perform the job and write down basic steps  Completely describe each step  Note deviations (Very Important!)

63 63 Job Safety Analysis

64 64 Identify Hazards & Potential Accidents  Search for Hazards  Produced by Work  Produced by Environment  Repeat job observation as many times as necessary to identify all hazards

65 65 Develop Solutions  Find a new way to do job  Change physical conditions that create hazards  Change the work procedure  Reduce frequency

66 66 New way to do job  Determine the work goal of the job, and then analyze the various ways of reaching this goal to see which way is safest.  Consider work saving tools and equipment.

67 67 Change in physical conditions  Tools, materials, equipment layout or location  Study change carefully for other benefits (costs, time savings)

68 68 Change in work procedures  What should the worker do to eliminate the hazard  How should it be done?  Document changes in detail

69 69 Reduce frequency  What can be done to reduce the frequency of the job??  Identify parts that cause frequent repairs - change  Reduce vibration save machine parts

70 70 What effects??  A job that has been redesigned may affect other jobs or work processes.  Check or re-observe the new process once it has been redesigned

71 71 SAFETY SCANNING HOW TO REALLY SEE AND RECOGNIZE SAFETY HAZARDS

72 72 SAFETY SCANNING OBJECTIVES  TO BECOME EFFECTIVE SAFETY SCANNERS –CONSTANTLY BE LOOKING FOR HAZARDS –SPOT AND RECOGNIZE HAZARDS –TAKE ACTION TO REDUCE OR ELIMINATE  UNDERSTAND BASIC HAZARDS  SAFETY IS NOT A SPECTATOR SPORT

73 73 HOW TO RECOGNIZE HAZARDS  TRAINING  JOB EXPERIENCE  FAMILIARITY WITH OPERATION  LACK OF FAMILIARITY WITH AREA  USE OF SAFETY SCANNING SURVEY TECHNIQUE

74 74 WHAT IS A HAZARD  CAUGHT IN OR BETWEEN  CONTACT WITH  STRUCK BY  FALL FROM OR ONTO  SLIP OR TRIP  WHAT IF?

75 75 HOW TO SAFETY SCAN SIPDE  SCAN BY LOOKING AROUND  IDENTIFY POTENTIAL HAZARDS  PREDICT WHAT COULD HAPPEN  DECIDE IF IT IS A HAZARD  EXECUTE NEEDED ACTION

76 76 BREAK LARGE AREAS INTO SMALL BITE SIZE PIECES  CANNOT EAT A WHOLE PIE AT ONCE  LOOK AT ONE SHOP  ONE WALL AREA OF SHOP  ONE PIECE OF EQUIPMENT  ONE ASPECT OF THAT EQUIPMENT

77 77 PRACTICE SAFETY SCANNING  DEMONSTRATION OF TECHNIQUE  REVIEW OF HAZARDS AND PRACTICE OF TECHNIQUE  USING SAFETY SCANNING

78 78 WHAT TO DO WHEN HAZARDS ARE IDENTIFIED  CORRECT YOURSELF OR WRITE WORK ORDER  REFER TO SUPERVISOR OR SAFETY DEPARTMENT  BRING UP IN SAFETY MEETING  REFER TO SAFETY COMMITTEE  REDUCE THE HAZARD UNTIL FIXED

79 79 ASSIGNMENT FOR CONTINUED PRACTICE  MUST PRACTICE TO BE EFFECTIVE  START WITH SMALL AREA AND SHORT TIME  INCREASE AREA AND TIME PRACTICED  GOAL IS TO MAKE IT AUTOMATIC  REVIEW AT NEXT MEETING

80 80 Questions?

81 81 THE END


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