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The Mindful Supervisor: Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision A Production of the Great Western Regional Field Coordinators – 2005-2007 Dr. John Eggers.

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Presentation on theme: "The Mindful Supervisor: Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision A Production of the Great Western Regional Field Coordinators – 2005-2007 Dr. John Eggers."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Mindful Supervisor: Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision A Production of the Great Western Regional Field Coordinators – Dr. John Eggers – Correctional Program Specialist, NIC

2 The Mindful Supervisor: Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision Great Western Regional Field Coordinators: Dave Dusschee – Oregon Tim Foss – Washington Carrie Hodap – Arizona Karen Holland – Wyoming Steven King – Utah Amy Le – California Gregory Morton – Oregon Aaron Shepard – Idaho Toni Spencer – California Wayne Ternes – Montana

3 With course design assistance provided by: Gary Lasater, Oregon Youth Authority Patrick Samples, Oregon Department of Corrections John Tyler, Oregon Department of Corrections The Mindful Supervisor: Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision

4 MINDFULNESS – A technique in which a person becomes purposefully aware of his/her thoughts, feelings and decisions in the present moment, non-judgmentally. It serves as a pre-requisite to developing insight and wisdom.

5 MINDFULNESS – Overlapping concepts: –Emotional Intelligence –Self Awareness –Authentic Leadership –Metacognition

6 LEADERSHIP AND SELF AWARENESS “21st century leadership calls for a new type of leader who understands him/herself well and can call others into a higher state of being, rather than the old style leader who simply knows how to manage [business] processes.” –Connelly and Diaz; Executive Awareness, 2007

7 LEADERSHIP AND SELF AWARENESS “ A fundamental starting point for leadership development is self awareness... Self- knowledge continues to serve our growth and development throughout life... who you are and what you believe is possible.” –Avolio and Luthans; The High Impact Leader, 2006

8 “Releasing ourselves from the need to keep half of ourselves hidden…, to entertain the possibility that there is an integral wholeness to all the seemingly antagonistic and opposing sides of ourselves, a possibility that we may not have to be ‘fixed’ or amended before we can serve ourselves or the company.” –David Whyte; The Heart Aroused, 1996

9 “ The unexamined life is not worth living.” Socrates, 399 BC

10 “The unexamined life is not worth living.” Socrates, 399 BC

11 Course Outline: 1.Qualities and Skill Building for Supervisors Personal Position Statement; Cognitive/Behavioral Model 2. Values Dissonance: Personal Vision & Organizational Context 3. Effective Communication 4. Making Decisions and Creating Solutions 5. Valuing Differences 6. Encouraging Performance 7. Team Building 8. Supervisory Development Plan

12 Qualities and Skill Building for Supervisors The Mindful Supervisor: Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision

13 Discuss at least one professional mentor and model in your life. Explain the concept of automatic thoughts and feelings. Examine the three internal dimensions of the Cognitive/Behavioral model. Review the two external dimensions of the Cognitive/Behavioral model. Utilize the Supervisory Self-Awareness (SSA) Model Performance Objectives:

14 What is an effective supervisor? What does being a supervisor mean to you? What are the skill sets needed by a supervisor? What emotions contribute to effectiveness? Questions

15 Mentors and Models Individually write the names of several people who you have learned from. List the memorable and effective characteristics and attributes that you adapted from each one.

16 Now list the negative attributes and characteristics that each had. Which would you keep? Which would you drop? Which would you add? Mentors and Models

17 1. QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS What’s missing in the picture of this tree?

18 1. QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS The roots!!!

19 1. QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS What are our roots like?

20 BEHAVIOR * Skill * Stated Knowledge THOUGHTS FEELINGS * More likely aware COGNITIVE STRUCTURE (thinking patterns) BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES * Under the surface Source: Mark Carey, The Carey Group

21 Personal Position Statement “What’s your frequency?”

22 QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS Cognitive/Behavioral Model

23 Situation FeelingsThoughts Consequences Behavior

24 Two External Dimensions Situations, Consequences Cognitive/Behavioral Model Three Internal Dimensions Thoughts, Feelings, Behavior

25 Risky thoughts and feelings contribute to either ineffective relationship or productivity outcomes. Pro-social thoughts and feelings contribute to effective relationship or productivity outcomes.

26 Cognitive/Behavioral Model Situation FeelingsThoughts Consequences Behavior

27 Cognitive/Behavioral Model Situation FeelingsThoughts Consequences Behavior

28 SUPERVISORY SELF AWARENESS NOTES SITUATIONAUTOMATIC THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS (Real) PREFERRED OUTCOME MINDFUL THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS (Desired) ACTION

29 Identify several situations List your real, automatic thoughts, feelings and actions Stop there

30 Review : Mentors and Roots Personal Position Statement Cognitive Behavioral Model Supervisory Self Awareness Notes Qualities and Skill Building for Supervisors

31 Personal Vision and Organizational Context Values Dissonance:

32 Utilize the Supervisory Self- Awareness (SSA) Model to analyze congruence between your Personal Position Statement and your agency Mission Utilize the SSA Model to analyze discrepancies between your Personal Position Statement and an agency policy or practice Performance Objectives:

33 Where there is no vision, the people perish.

34 Identify your agency’s mission statement. Don’t interpret it according to your own preferences. Retrieve your personal position statement. Using an SSA worksheet, compare the two. Is there any dissonance ? Individual Activity - Mission Statement

35 Choose a situation where you are in conflict with the expectations of your agency Fill out Automatic Thoughts and Feelings, Preferred Outcomes and Mindful Thoughts and Feelings Don’t fill out the Action section Individual Activity - Personal Values vs. Agency Values Conflict

36 Did you have automatic thoughts or feelings? Were they risky? How did you express those automatic thoughts or feelings? What were your behaviors? What were the positive and negative consequences of those behaviors? Personal Values vs. Agency Values Conflict

37 Do your personal beliefs impact your organizational expectations? Do your personal beliefs impact your expectations as a supervisor? Personal Vision and Organizational Context

38 360˚ Supervisor Skills Assessment Instrument The Mindful Supervisor

39 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK, aka Using Your Mirrors “There is a way to do it better... find it.” Thomas A. Edison, describing his research strategy

40 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK Three Reasons We Reject Feedback Given By Others Unwillingness to Challenge Self- perceptions Fear of Exposing Weaknesses Fear of Unbalanced Feedback Lepsinger, Lucia; The Art and Science of 360 Feedback

41 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK Unwillingness to Challenge Self-perceptions Comfort zones are comfortable Why mess with a good thing? A strong belief in oneself and one’s ability are important factors in management confidence

42 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK Fear of Exposing Weaknesses And a voluntary 360 is like asking for our weaknesses to be exposed – publicly Can set up defensiveness and denial Are you calling me fat?

43 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK Fear of Unbalanced Feedback People will only see the negatives The good things I do will be overlooked and ignored Nobody’s perfect, but I’m not a total idiot

44 MINDFULNESS – A technique in which a person becomes purposefully aware of his/her thoughts, feelings and decisions in the present moment, non-judgmentally. It serves as a pre-requisite to developing insight and wisdom.

45 Supervisory Self Awareness Notes SITUATIONAUTOMATIC THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS (Real) PREFERRED OUTCOME MINDFUL THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS (Desired) ACTION

46 EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Change your thinking and you change your world.

47 Discuss the value of Stephen Covey’s Habit #5. Identify the three components of verbal communication and the percentage of information found in each. Explain the relationship of Self Talk to the Communications model and to the Cognitive/Behavioral Model. Performance Objectives:

48 Describe the Arc of Distortion. Utilize the Left-Hand Column Model to analyze thoughts and feelings. Performance Objectives:

49 “Seek first to understand and then to be understood.” Habit #5 Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, 1990.

50 Communication Assessment Courageous Communication. Win-win; we constantly learn from and grow with each other. Problems occur; we work to fix them. Repeat as necessary. Pretty much on the same page. Agree to Disagree, then step away. I’d do more if you would. Adversarial; I win, you lose. It’s mostly your fault. Contentious. Sabotage Communication. Enemies, enemies; everywhere you look.

51 Communication Assessment Courageous Communication. Win-win; we constantly learn from and grow with each other. Problems occur; we work to fix them. Repeat as necessary. Pretty much on the same page. Agree to Disagree, then step away. I’d do more if you would. Adversarial; I win, you lose. It’s mostly your fault. Contentious. Sabotage Communication. Enemies, enemies; everywhere you look. Self Work

52 Communication and Trust Empathy/Caring Commitment/ Dedication Honesty/Openness Competence/ Expertise

53 3 Components of Communication Language 7% Body Language 55% Paralanguage 38%

54 The Communication Iceberg Attitude, motivational level Communication skill level 10% 90%

55 “Seek first to understand and then to be understood.” Stephen R. Covey Behaviors of Courageous Communication in Supervision

56 The Communication Model The Sender The Receiver Feedback >>> FILTERS >>> FILTERS The Message

57 The Responsibilities of the Receiver The Receiver >>> FILTERS The Sender The Messag e

58 How do you know someone is NOT listening?

59 Receiver Filters What we are thinking and feeling, Our Self Talk while the other person is speaking.

60 Receiver Filters Self Talk The Receiver >>> FILTERS The Sender The Messag e

61 I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. Unknown What you actually heard Arc of “Distortion MAYBE YES Arc of Distortion

62 “Focus on the Situation, Issue or Behavior and Not on the Person.” Achieve Global

63 Advocacy and Inquiry Advocacy: n. an advocating: a speaking or writing in support (of something) Inquiry n. 1. The act of inquiring. 2. An investigation or examination. 3. A question; query.

64 4 Steps of Inquiry 1.Temporarily suspend your internal filters 2.Listen 3.Ask questions about what you hear 4.Ask more questions about the answers you receive

65 Mindfulness in communication P

66 Fight or Flight? Fight Expression of anger Subtle sarcasm Sharp answers Clever comebacks Belittling humor Judgments Flight Withdrawal Feeling sorry for oneself Sulking Growing cold Being indifferent Escaping involvement Escaping responsibilities

67 Cognitive/Behavioral Model Situation FeelingsThoughts Consequences Behavior

68 Change your thinking and you change your world.

69 Check your filters Check your Self Talk Work on reducing your Arc of Distortion Practice the 4 Steps of Inquiry Receiver Skill Sets

70 Responsibility of the Sender The Sender >>> FILTERS The Receiver The Message

71 Sender Filters Left-hand ColumnRight-hand Column >>> What I’m thinking What is said

72 Left-hand Column Exercise Left-hand Column Right-hand Column Jon: I heard you bought a new car. You: Yes, I got a new red sports car. Jon: Really, what kind? You: A Jaguar. Jon: A brand new one You: You betcha.

73 Left-hand Column Exercise Right-hand Column Jon: I heard you bought a new car. You: Yes, I got a new red sports car. Jon: Really, what kind? You: A Jaguar. Jon: A brand new one You: You betcha. Left-hand Column Jon: How can you afford a new car? You: Woo hoo! Look at me now Jon: Probably a Ford You: A Convertible Jon: It’s probably a You: Eat your heart out

74 Left-hand Column Exercise Right-hand Column Q: How long have you been working as a supervisor? A: About a year. Q: Have you had any major concerns with staff? A: Yea, a couple of times. Q: So did you talk to anyone about your concerns? A: No, I didn’t want my peers to think I was weak. Left-hand Column

75 Sender Filters Left-hand ColumnRight-hand Column >>> What I’m thinking What is said

76 What was I trying to accomplish? Did I achieve the results I wanted? How might have my comments contributed to the difficulties? Why didn’t I say what was in my left hand column? What assumptions did I make about the other person or people? How can I use my left-hand column as a resource to improve communications? Reflection : Using Your Left-hand Column as a Resource

77 The Message >>> FILTER S The Sender The Receiver The Message

78 Communication Stoppers “This is the way it is…” “You’re wrong…” “What’s your proof…” “Whatever” “You…” We vs. They or Us vs. Them GOSSIP

79 To look outward is to blame; to look inward is to own.

80 “When the relationship is not well established, a chapter of words won’t be sufficient to communicate meaning because meanings are not found in words – they are found in people.” Covey, Stephen R., The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Simon & Schuster, New York, NY, 1990.

81 How to get your point across State your main point immediately Use language easily understood Write to the needs of the listener Spell correctly Have a friend or co-worker review it Don’t assume with

82 The Filters >>> FILTERS The Sender The Receiver The Message

83 Story of the Pioneer During the days of wagon trains moving west, a rest station formed overnight in Northern Minnesota. Most wagon trains passed through this station. One old gentlemen always greeted each group of pioneers. One day, a family of pioneers asked the old man what the people were like out west. The old man says, “What were the people like where you came from?” The pioneer says, “Oh, they were great people. In fact, our neighbors all got together and bought us this buckboard. We are really going to miss them.” “Well,” says the old man, “you are in luck. That is exactly how the people are out west were you are going.” A month or so later, another pioneer family passed through the rest station. They approached the old man and asked him what the people were like out west. The old man says, “What were the people like where you came from?” The pioneer says, “They were mean and despicable and always trying to cheat us. That is why we left the East to go out west.” “Well,” says the old man, “(fill in the blank) “

84 MAKING DECISIONS AND CREATING SOLUTIONS

85 Apply the Cognitive/Behavioral Model to past outcomes. Develop an alternative list of Thoughts and Feelings related to a past outcome. Coach others in the use of the Cognitive/Behavioral Model related to past outcomes. Performance Objectives:

86 Supervisory Self Awareness Notes SITUATIONAUTOMATIC THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS (Real) PREFERRED OUTCOME MINDFUL THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS (Desired) ACTION

87 State the situation objectively Identify your thoughts and feelings Identify any risky thoughts/feelings What behavior did you choose? What were the consequences? Supervisory Self Awareness Notes

88 Brainstorm a list of new thoughts and feelings to replace your risky thoughts and feelings Decide what new thoughts and feelings will bring you closer to the outcome you desire Decide the action you will take following those new thoughts and feelings Supervisory Self Awareness Notes

89 VALUING DIFFERENCES

90 Identify professional strengths in four color types. Develop and present non-labeling “Differences” presentation. Apply the color types to a job- specific event. Relate the color types to agency diversity practices. Performance Objectives:

91 Blue Gold Green Orange True Colors

92 3. VALUING DIFFERENCES BLUE Sympathetic, personal Relationship oriented, cherish harmony Process rather than content Can project uncertainty Adept at interacting with and supporting others “I personally don’t care whether it needs to be fixed or not as long as we all agree. The agreement’s the thing.”

93 3. VALUING DIFFERENCES GOLD Prefers practical, realistic plans Measurable goals; rational Blueprint with time lines, e.g. PERT chart Follow-through May be rigid and formulaic Honors traditional methods “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

94 3. VALUING DIFFERENCES GREEN Abstract, analytical, inventive Create new systems and improve designs My head rules my heart, logically Appreciate work that is mentally stimulating May question authority, be impatient with routine Long-range focus “It needs to be fixed on some level. Look harder.”

95 3. VALUING DIFFERENCES ORANGE Experimentation, pilot projects Change is an on-going process Timing is everything Short-range focus Desire immediate results/instant gratification “We haven’t changed things for a while, so why not today?!”

96 True Colors Activity What are the strengths of your color? What attributes does your group possess that each of the other groups should possess? Explain why. BE PERSUASIVE AND DIRECT.

97 True Colors Activity Develop and present a brief lesson to the large group, dealing with “True Colors” in a non-pejorative fashion.

98 Review What have you learned or taught yourselves from this exercise?

99 Encouraging Performance

100 Performance Objectives: Explain the concept of reinforcement as a relative relationship Discuss the value of a 4:1, positive : negative reinforcement ratio Describe the steps for using negative consequences Examine the value of modeling in the effective use of authority

101 Reinforcement Exists in the relationship between things Incentives and rewards should always be individualized

102 Reinforcement Positive Reinforcement is the introduction of something desired to increase a behavior Negative Reinforcement is the removal or reduction of something undesirable to increase a behavior

103 4:1 – WATCH YOUR RATIO! 4 – INCENTIVES AND POSTIVE REINFORCERS matched with 1 – LIMITS AND NEGATIVE CONSEQUENCES

104 ENCOURAGING PERFORMANCE FOR MOST PEOPLE... Attention is like sunshine to us What we give our attention to, grows What we ignore, withers

105 ENCOURAGING PERFORMANCE We Learn By: What We See and Hear (Observe) What We Practice (Model) What Is Reinforced

106 ENCOURAGING PERFORMANCE Therefore, make sure: Staff SEE desired behavior; Staff HEAR desired behavior; Staff PRACTICE desired behavior; and Staff ARE REINFORCED when desired behavior is demonstrated.

107 ENCOURAGING PERFORMANCE Key Components of Positive Reinforcement: Noticing Sincerely praise progress (any progress) The more frequently and sincerely you pay attention to a behavior, the more it will be repeated

108 Limits and Negative Consequences Apply immediately to extinguish unwanted behavior Follow through Apply at the level of the behavior Apply consistently Use a variety of negative limits and consequences

109 Limits and Negative Consequences Use short-sweet consequences, never spread out or use harsh and extensive consequences Apply these unemotionally or with neutral affect Stop showing disapproval once the current behavior is extinguished.

110 Effective Use of Authority Clarify expectations Set standards Provide respectful feedback Model desired behaviors

111 1. Arguing for change 2. Assuming the expert role 3. Criticizing, shaming or blaming 4. Labeling 5. Being in a hurry 6. Claiming preeminence 1. Arguing for change 2. Assuming the expert role 3. Criticizing, shaming or blaming 4. Labeling 5. Being in a hurry 6. Claiming preeminence Avoid The Boss Traps

112 Not Listening: Roadblocks (Thomas Gordon) 1.Ordering, directing, commanding 2.Warning, cautioning, threatening 3.Giving advice, providing suggestions and solutions 4.Persuading with logic, arguing, lecturing 5.Moralizing 6.Disagreeing, judging, criticizing, blaming 7.Shaming, ridiculing, labeling 8.Interpreting, analyzing 9.Reassuring, sympathizing, consoling 10.Questioning, probing, interrogating 11.Withdrawing, distracting, humoring, changing the subject

113 Encouraging Performance Instead: Roll with resistance. Defending breeds defensiveness. Resistance is a signal to respond differently. Avoid arguing for change. Labeling is unnecessary. Use momentum to positive advantage. Invite new perspectives rather than impose them.

114 Encouraging Performance And: Recognize “Change Talk”; Support it. Notice it; Reflect it; Don’t ignore it. Ask for examples/elaboration. The employee is the primary source for new answers and solutions. Affirm change talk (reinforce, encourage, support). Summarize; paraphrase.

115 Reminder! People change because they think they have a problem, not because you think they have a problem.

116 Summary Reinforcement can be both positive and negative Incentives and rewards should always be individualized Remember the 4:1 ratio Model desired behaviors

117 Team Building

118 Accomplish guided team activitiesAccomplish guided team activities Utilize previous training material during team building activities in order to increase team effectivenessUtilize previous training material during team building activities in order to increase team effectiveness Coach class members regarding relevant skill sets demonstrated during team building activitiesCoach class members regarding relevant skill sets demonstrated during team building activities Performance Objectives:

119 Snow SurvivalSnow Survival Control TowerControl Tower Blind ShapesBlind Shapes Hollow SquareHollow Square Exercise Choices:

120 How was the team practicing effective communication skills?How was the team practicing effective communication skills? Did the team use cognitive behavioral techniques? Did the team use cognitive behavioral techniques? What decision making and creating solution skills did you observe being used?What decision making and creating solution skills did you observe being used? Observers

121 Habit #7: Sharpen the Saw

122 8.SUPERVISORY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

123 The Supervisory Development Plan is the bridge between this course and your return to the work site. It puts everything into the context of the bigger picture.

124 8.SUPERVISORY DEVELOPMENT PLAN To begin your Supervisory Development Plan, use these lists to decide which areas are strengths and challenges for you. With each of these areas fill out a Supervisory Self Awareness Worksheet.

125 8.SUPERVISORY DEVELOPMENT PLAN In the Situation column of the worksheet, list the situations you see you most need improvement in. List your thoughts and feelings, both automatic and mindful, and then the preferred outcomes. What action do you plan to take to increase your effectiveness in each area?

126 8.SUPERVISORY DEVELOPMENT PLAN If you have Supervisory Self Awareness worksheets unfinished Fill out the bottom half of the “Action” part of the form—what will your actions be now?

127 Thank you all for your time, energy, thoughts and feelings. A Production of the Great Western Regional Field Coordinators – Dr. John Eggers – Correctional Program Specialist, NIC


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