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WrapEd – YOUTH GANG PREVENTION PRESENTATION TO THE ALBERTA COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION ASSOCIATION – NOVEMBER 25, 2014 LIZ LACIKA – EDMONTON JOHN HOWARD.

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Presentation on theme: "WrapEd – YOUTH GANG PREVENTION PRESENTATION TO THE ALBERTA COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION ASSOCIATION – NOVEMBER 25, 2014 LIZ LACIKA – EDMONTON JOHN HOWARD."— Presentation transcript:

1 WrapEd – YOUTH GANG PREVENTION PRESENTATION TO THE ALBERTA COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION ASSOCIATION – NOVEMBER 25, 2014 LIZ LACIKA – EDMONTON JOHN HOWARD JAN FOX –REACH EDMONTON

2 WRAP ED WRAPED IS A PARNTERSHIP OF COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS, MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT, SCHOOL BOARDS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT THAT CAME TOGETHER TO APPLY FOR FUNDING FROM THE NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION CENTER FOR A YOUTH GANG INITIAIVE

3 OUR PARTNERS EDMONTON JOHN HOWARD SOCIETY THE AFRICA CENTER YOUCAN YOUTH SERVICES NATIVE COUNSELLING SERVICES OF ALBERTA EDMONTON POLICE SERVICES

4 REACH EDMONTON  WORKS AS A CATALYST, ENGAGING PARTNERS TO WORK COLLABORATIVELY TO MAKE EDMONTON A SAFER CITY  IS A BACKBONE ORGANIZATION  HAS COLLECTIVE IMPACT

5 WHAT IS COLLECTIVE IMPACT? 5 CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESS 1.COMMON AGENDA 2.SHARED MEASUREMENT 3.MUTUALLY REINFORCING ACTIVITIES 4.CONTINUOUS COMMUNICATION 5.BACKBONE SUPPORT

6 A BACKBONE …. THE VALUE…  STRENGTHEN EXISTING PROGRAMS, IDENTIFY GAPS AND LAUNCH NEW INITIATIVES  ENPOWER GROUPS AND AGENCIES

7 WHY IT MATTERS EXPECTED BACKBONE OBJECTIVES  PARTNERS ALIGN WITH A COMMON AGENDA  PARTNERS COLLABORATIVELY DEVELOP NEW APPROACHES  COMMUNITY MEMBERS FEEL EMPOWERED TO TAKE ACTION  POLICY CHANGES OCCUR  SYSTEMS CHANGE  PHILANTROPIC AND PUBLIC FUNDS INCREASINGLY SUPPORTIVE

8 A CASE STUDY… THE COST OF COLLABORATION TOOL DESIGNED TO HELP PARTNERSHIPS, FUNDERS AND POLICY MAKERS TO REALIZE THE FULL POTENTIAL OF COLLABORATION WHEN ADDRESSING COMPLEX SOCIAL ISSUE UNDERSTAND HOW COLLABORATION WORKS AND WHAT SUCCESSFUL COLLABORATION IS ASSESS HOW WELL THEIR COLLABORATION WORKS IDENTIFY AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT

9 EVALUATION AT THE OUTSET  ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN TO DETERMINE WHO SHOULD BE INVOLVED  RIGOUROUS EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS PROMPTED REACH TO INVEST UPFRONT  EMBARKED UPON THIS PROCESS EVALUATION TO DOCUMENT TRUECOSTS  SOME LIMITATIONS TO THE TOOLS USED SO ALSO CONDUCTED CASE STUDY (CHRONOLOGY)  51k – 60k WITH IN KIND

10 THE RESULTS  CONTRIBUTION OF BACKBONE ORGANIZATION ESSENTIAL DUE TO RIGOUROUS EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION PROCESS (38k)  IMPORTANCE OF SHARED DECISION MAKING  DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF EACH OTHER’S WORK  ENHANCED ABILITY TO ADDRESS IMPORTANT ISSUES

11 RESULTS (CONTINUED) DEVELOPED NEW SKILLS INCREASED PUBLIC PROFILE ABILITY TO INFLUENCE PUBLIC POLICY ENHANCED ABILITY TO MEET CLIENT NEEDS

12 DRAWBACKS  DIVERSION OF TIME FROM OTHER DUTIES  FRUSTRATION  MANDATE CONFLICT  WEAKER LINK  INSUFFICIENT INFLUENCE IN PARTNERSHIP ACTIVITIES  INSUFFICIENT RECOGNITION GIVEN  BENEFITS EXCEEDED DRAWBACKS

13 QUESTIONS???

14 Wrap ED is a first in Canada We’ve created a partnership in Edmonton to develop a new, intentional approach to move youth people who are affected by violent crime away from the threat of gangs. Through offering integrated services, Wrap ED partners will help these young people learn how to thrive in our community. Wrap ED Clients will work with support workers, family and community members, choosing the supports each needs to help them live out of harms way and move forward in their life. Edmonton has been selected by the Federal Government for 5 years of funding It’s all based on relationships – with each other and the teens we serve.

15 The Foundation Wrap ED: Wrap = wraparound, Ed = Edmonton The wraparound approach was selected because:  It reflects the diversity of the collaboration  It allows for a strength-base approach for the youth AND organizations involved  Everyone will be able to bring their knowledge, cultural awareness, and strengths to the project for the benefit of the youth  It is well developed and proven to be effective in numerous communities  It is conducive with a trauma informed approach (focuses on understanding the whole individual and appreciates the context in which that youth is living their life)  It allows the project to focus on the individual, putting the client in the centre of the room Wrap ED will be based on the Ten Principles of the Wraparound Process:  Family voice and choice  Collaboration  Persistence  Strength Based  Community-based  Outcome based  Culturally Competent  Team based  Individualized  Natural supports

16 Wrap Ed Is a new model focused on collective impact Each organization brings there own expertise Our work is intentional: ie training together, weekly meetings Outcomes focused, so we know exactly what we’ve learned, defining the collective impact we’ve made It give agencies a framework to: create a common agenda shared measurement system continuous communication a progressive approach to overcome funding barriers (instead of competing against each other for funding we came together for the same funding)

17 Wrap Ed Timeline Early March, 2012: Initial meetings to gauge interest in a collaborative submission to the NCPC’s YGPF call for LOIs. Late March, 2012: Meeting with core partners to begin development of the Letter of Intent April 5, 2012: LOI submitted June 5, 2012: Learned that Wrap Ed was one of 14 projects from across Canada selected among 168 letters of intent to be developed into full project proposals. June 12 – 14, 2012: YGPF Proposal Development training hosted by NCPC in Toronto, attended by Holly Miller (on behalf of the collaborative) and Gene Chan (as evaluation support) September 21, 2012: Submission of the full Wrap Ed project proposal, the only proposal to be submitted on time from this YGPF cohort. June, 2013: Wrap Ed proposal approved for funding, partners rejoice Approximately 15 months from beginning to end of the process to apply for funding

18 Partnerships Edmonton John Howard Society At Edmonton John Howard Society, we serve young people without support systems, people impacted by family violence, and men and women at risk or involved with the justice system. All find a warm welcome and the help they need to discover hope in their lives. We also work to build understanding about the causes and consequences of crime and to prevent crime in our communities through public education.young peoplepeople impacted by family violencemen and women at risk or involved with the justice systempublic education At Edmonton John Howard Society, we offer hope and opportunities through a variety of practical services and innovative programs: Housing and help finding housing Help finding employment Help finding other community services Supportive services Anger management courses Public Legal Education programs for schools and community groups Courses at the New Edmonton Remand Centre Housing for youth experiencing homelessness Services for individuals involved in domestic violence

19 YOUCAN (Youth Organizing to Understand Conflict and Advocate Non‐Violence) Youth Services Is a non‐profit charitable organization dedicated to empowering and building a culture of peace among today’s youth. We assist young people in developing the skills needed to move out of harm’s way, transition into employment or back into education, reduce youth violence and participate actively in youth issues. Our mission is to equip youth to engage and inspire others to peacefully resolve conflicts and develop healthy relationships in their communities.

20 African Center To promote early learning to African-Canadian families and offer educational opportunities to pre-school children. To provide educational opportunities and support to African-Canadian school-aged children to help them succeed in the Canadian school system. To educate and empower African-Canadian women, youth, seniors and others to help them integrate into Canadian society. To educate and increase the Canadian public's understanding of and appreciation for African culture. To educate African-Canadians about the Canadian political process in order to encourage respect for and participation in the democratic process in Canada.

21 Native Counselling Services of Alberta Mission is to contribute to the holistic development and wellness of the Aboriginal individual, family and community. By respecting differences, we aim to promote the fair and equitable treatment of Aboriginal people and advocate for the future development of our partners. By developing and maintaining strong partnerships and honouring our relationships, we are committed to evolving proactively with our changing environment. We will continue to strategically plan and deliver culturally sensitive programs and community education through accountable resource management.

22 Back to our Roots – Original Vision

23 Target Group Youth who feel society has turned its back on them They may be homeless, experienced trauma, often living in poverty They struggle with every system they interact with Youth between 12 and 17 years of age 60 youth will engaged per cohort, 3 cohorts, total of 180 youth potentially participating over 5 years The partnership anticipates that:  Aboriginal and immigrant/refugee youth that present criminological behaviours linked with gang activity that have experience trauma will make up the majority of youth in the program  Some type of contact with police and the justice system will have taken place, as offenders or as victims  Low school attendance, or will not be attending at all  Low attachment to family  Few cultural ties  Co-occuring issues (addiction, mental health, violence, homelessness)  High number of female participants Secondary beneficiaries of the project will be the families of the youth participants

24 Referrals Referrals (approx. 3 months) WrapEd partnership will develop a community referral form, to be made available to community agencies, schools, probation, etc. It is anticipated that WrapEd partners will refer youth that are currently attending other programming that they offer Once the referral is received, the IMR-08 Vulnerable Persons Risk Matrix will be applied to provide insight into the level of vulnerability of the youth based on police data  The IMR-08 risk factors include mental illness, medical distress, substance abuse, involvement in sexual exploitation, previous history of eloped/missing persons, previous history of attempted suicides, victim offender overlap and violent crime victimization  Do we want to apply the IMR-08 now or during Intake/Assessment?

25 Assessment/Intake/Relationship Building Assessment/Intake/Relationship Building (4-5 months) An assessment tool will be applied through a collective process with the Project Manager and the project staff The assessment tool has not yet been selected – partnership wanted the Project Manager to be involved in the selection process An evaluation of where the youth falls on the trauma spectrum will form part of the assessment process If the youth is eligible and agrees to participate, an intake form will be completed Every effort will be made to match the youth with a program staff person that is the best fit for the youth  Youth must feel comfortable with this person  This person will lead that youth’s wraparound plan  Creates the highest likelihood of a long term relationship and highest probability of engagement Relationships are key to this project – which is why a significant amount of time is dedicated to this initial relationship building stage If a youth is eligible to participate, but unwilling to participate in programming, they will be offered the opportunity to participate in the control group, with gift cards offered as incentives and an open invitation to participate in a future cohort.

26 Programming Formal Programming (12 months) Difficult to describe in detail, as each youth will have different needs which will be responded to through the wraparound approach Some of the elements that may be incorporated into a youth’s wraparound plan include:  Youth Outreach & Engagement: Going to where the youth is, identifying needs, assisting with immediate needs, etc.  Youth Assessments: Completing assessments to gain a clearer image of the youth’s challenges and needs  Cultural Teachings: With support of elders, reconnecting youth to their culture as desired/appropriate  Addressing Identity: Helping youth to discovery and be proud of who they are, building self-esteem, helping them to feel like part of a positive community (rather than identifying with a gang)  Conflict Resolution & Mediation: Giving youth tools to resolve conflict in healthy, non-violent ways. Assistance to resolve existing conflict  Systems Navigation & Advocacy: Helping youth access services, deal with existing legal issues, etc.  Trauma Counseling: Where appropriate, provide access to trauma specialists

27 More elements of wraparound programming  Addictions Treatment: Helping the youth to access addictions services as required  Academic Support: Assist youth to access education (re-integration at school, distance education, training)  Recreation Activities: Helping youth discover their passions and hobbies, engaging them in positive activities  Mentorship: Connecting youth with positive role models  Employment Support: Connecting with employment/career services  Volunteerism: Encouraging youth to give back to their communities in positive ways by volunteering  Leadership Training: Empowering youth to become leaders among their peers and communities, gain leadership skills As required, programming will be delivered in culturally appropriate ways Positive existing networks will be incorporated into the youth’s wraparound case plan WrapEd staff will work together to access required services, although one staff person will be the lead Formal Programming (continued)

28 Transition Plan Community Transition Period (approx. 4 months) Youth will begin to transition out of the formal program Youth will turn to using existing supports in the community Positive peer and community connections are reinforced during this time

29 Training Reclaiming Youth Feb 11, 2012 Colors Training Feb 14 Pre-Migration Trauma Feb 19 Literacy’s Impact on Crime and YouthFeb 20 Y50 List Training Feb 21 Working with High Risk YouthFeb 24 Gang AwarenessMarch 3 Crisis InterventionMarch 6 YCJAMarch 6 Understand Identity Across CultureMarch 7 Wrap ED RetreatMarch 11 – 13 Circle Training March 17, 18 Trauma TrainingMarch 19 Working with Probation OfficersMarch 24 Tour of EYOCMarch 26 Truth and ReconciliationMarch 27 – 30 Sweat Lodge CeremonyApril 1 Historical TraumaApril 2 Mental Health First AidApril 3 – 4 Family Violence in a Cultural ContextApril 7 Wrap Around TrainingApril

30 Challenges Hiring the right staff, already had three staff changes Staff for EJHS were hired in January 2014 We did not get any youth till the end of April 2014 Too much training in the beginning Budget restrictions, ie:$ per youth but can only use $50.00 at a time, budget will pay for youth dinner but not staff Need clear communication among partners Getting appropriate youth Program starting with no data base/will have to back log Program starting without proper intake forms/meet data base Strict budget Maintaining individual agencies identities

31 Successes The freedom to meet youth where they are at Flexible hours Individual self identified goal planning The diversity of the partners Excellent support for youth workers Just about at capacity with youth Data base is just about done Lower caseloads will make it easier to develop positive relationships and trust Ultimately………. A decrease in gang membership and violent crime Young people and their families will be living with hope Recognition that collective impact works

32 Evaluation Process Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) - Touchpoints Information from the evaluations will support formal reporting to NCPC – Project Manager Reports (PMR) twice per year, Annual Evaluation Report, and a Final Project Report. More importantly, it will support the project’s quality improvement process.. Program reach 2. Program infrastructure 3. Program delivery 4. Partnership 5. Challenges / Lessons Learned / Opportunities 6. Sustainability

33 Overview of Youth Worker Data Collection - ASSESSMENT Background The timing of intake and assessment are based on the evaluation group’s knowledge of typical client interactions. This practice-based evidence indicates that youth typically feel comfortable talking about some of their concerns with their Youth Worker within 5 contacts. By 15 contacts, youth trust the Youth Worker enough to share more sensitive concerns. Assessment Collection of all of the following information occurs within 15 contacts of the youth being referred to WrapEd. By this time, the youth should feel comfortable talking with the Youth Worker and sharing this type of information. The following methods will be used: Structured conversations Monthly tracking based on Youth Worker observations and ongoing conversations Monthly Youth Worker reflection notes, to be used to guide occasional reflective conversations with the evaluation team Youth Worker Action Plan data that is relevant to the evaluation

34 Structured Conversations Youth Workers use the exact words and scale responses in the questions to complete Structured Conversations with youth The questions need to be asked in the same order Resiliency Hopefulness Sense of control over life School /Education attitudes Culture Culture Fist Nations, Métis or Inuit Goal attainment The relationship between the Youth Worker and youth may be ready for these types of questions when youth: Bring up their issues or concern with the Youth Worker (rather than Youth Worker starting the conversation) Follow-up on agreed-upon actions between meetings Do not ignore the Youth Worker Youth Workers will repeat some of these structured conversations later in the program, such as at program exit, mid-point (in some cases) and follow-up. Paper surveys will initially be used, but ultimately the data will be entered in ETO

35 Monthly Tracking: Youth Workers record observations and key points from their ongoing conversations with each youth on their caseload in Monthly Tracking Youth Workers will track the data on the last week of every month, starting at Assessment Youth Workers will track this data separately for each youth Reflective Group Conversations (with evaluators) Youth Workers will participate in Reflective Group Conversations with the evaluators Youth Workers will keep monthly notes, starting at Assessment, about the topic area in response to the reflective questions The information is not specifically about individual youth. It is an overall reflection on what changes are/are not happening with youth. Reflections should include successes/progress and barriers/challenges Youth Workers will discuss their monthly notes with their Supervisor during monthly supervision Youth Workers will bring their monthly notes to the Reflective Conversations Action Plans: Information from some areas of the Action Plans that Youth Workers create with youth will also inform the evaluation

36 QUESTIONS??? ?


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