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The setting of the book of Philippians. To look at the city of Philippi today, one may not be very impressed. But, If we could step back into the time.

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Presentation on theme: "The setting of the book of Philippians. To look at the city of Philippi today, one may not be very impressed. But, If we could step back into the time."— Presentation transcript:

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3 The setting of the book of Philippians.

4 To look at the city of Philippi today, one may not be very impressed. But, If we could step back into the time of the Apostles, “… Philippi, which is the foremost city of that part of Macedonia, a colony…" (Acts 16:12) Philippi was named after Philip II a great statesman and general. He was the 18 th king of Macedon from 359 until his assassination by one of his body guards in 336 BC. In 168 B.C. all of Macedonia 25,500 sq. miles fell under Roman, rule. In 42 B.C. Philippi was made a Roman colony by Augustus.

5 Rome colonized certain places which gave them offensive and defensive positions. Retired soldiers and government officials were placed in these colonies. The “Egnatian way” the main overland route between Asia and the west ran through Philippi. Located 10 miles in-land from the Aegean Sea, the city sat on a hill of a broad flat plain surrounded by mountains which made it a natural fortress. The gold and silver mines of nearby “Mount Pangauem”, made the city important for banking and trade.

6 Paul made his way into Philippi on his second missionary journey in about 52 A.D. after seeing a vision of a man. “…Come over to Macedonia, and help us…" (Acts 16:9). As we read Acts 16, we’re introduced to some of these Philippians: V:23-34, Paul and Silas are cast into prison where they meet the jailer. V:13-15, The women that meet by the river for prayer; they meet Lydia. V:16-22, Paul and Silas imprisoned because certain “…masters saw that their hope of profit was gone,…”

7 The book of Philippians is thought to be written from his Roman imprisonment (62-64 AD) “All the saints greet you, but especially those who are of Caesar's household. Philippians 4:22; 1:13.

8 The setting of the book of Philippians. The survey of the book of Philippians.

9 The book of Philippians has been described as “Paul’s hymn of Joy.” As you go through the letter a key word to notice is “JOY” (Philippians 1:3-4,18,25; 2:1-2,16-18; 3:1; 4:1,4). As you consider a purpose for the letter, we can see Paul’s desire to comfort them in his imprisonment, admonish them to live faithfully to the Lord, warn them of the dangers!

10 1: Introduction and progress of the gospel in Rome.

11 Philippians 1: But I want you to know, brethren, that the things which happened to me have actually turned out for the furtherance of the gospel, 13 so that it has become evident to the whole palace guard, and to all the rest, that my chains are in Christ; 14 and most of the brethren in the Lord, having become confident by my chains, are much more bold to speak the word without fear. 15 Some indeed preach Christ even from envy and strife, and some also from good will: 16 The former preach Christ from selfish ambition, not sincerely, supposing to add affliction to my chains; 17 but the latter out of love, knowing that I am appointed for the defense of the gospel. 18 What then? Only that in every way, whether in pretense or in truth, Christ is preached; and in this I rejoice, yes, and will rejoice.

12 1: Introduction and progress of the gospel in Rome. 1:27-2:18 - Practical exhortations of faith in Christ.

13 Philippians 2: Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling; 13 for it is God who works in you both to will and to do for His good pleasure. 14 Do all things without complaining and disputing, 15 that you may become blameless and harmless, children of God without fault in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world, 16 holding fast the word of life, so that I may rejoice in the day of Christ that I have not run in vain or labored in vain.

14 1: Introduction and progress of the gospel in Rome. 1:27-2:18 - Practical exhortations of faith in Christ. 2: The visit of Timothy and return of Epaphroditus to Philippi..

15 Philippians 2: Yet I considered it necessary to send to you Epaphroditus, my brother, fellow worker, and fellow soldier, but your messenger and the one who ministered to my need; 26 since he was longing for you all, and was distressed because you had heard that he was sick. 27 For indeed he was sick almost unto death; but God had mercy on him, and not only on him but on me also, lest I should have sorrow upon sorrow. 28 Therefore I sent him the more eagerly, that when you see him again you may rejoice, and I may be less sorrowful. 29 Receive him therefore in the Lord with all gladness, and hold such men in esteem; 30 because for the work of Christ he came close to death, not regarding his life, to supply what was lacking in your service toward me.

16 1: Introduction and progress of the gospel in Rome. 1:27-2:18 - Practical exhortations of faith in Christ. 2: The visit of Timothy and return of Epaphroditus to Philippi.. 3: Warning against the threat of judaizing teachers.

17 Philippians 3:1-3 - Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. For me to write the same things to you is not tedious, but for you it is safe. 2 Beware of dogs, beware of evil workers, beware of the mutilation! 3 For we are the circumcision, who worship God in the Spirit, rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh,

18 1: Introduction and progress of the gospel in Rome. 1:27-2:18 - Practical exhortations of faith in Christ. 4: Concluding exhortations and final thoughts. 2: The visit of Timothy and return of Epaphroditus to Philippi.. 3: Warning against the threat of judaizing teachers.

19 Philippians 4: Now you Philippians know also that in the beginning of the gospel, when I departed from Macedonia, no church shared with me concerning giving and receiving but you only. 16 For even in Thessalonica you sent aid once and again for my necessities. 17 Not that I seek the gift, but I seek the fruit that abounds to your account. 18 Indeed I have all and abound. I am full, having received from Epaphroditus the things sent from you, a sweet- smelling aroma, an acceptable sacrifice, well pleasing to God. 19 And my God shall supply all your need according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.

20 The setting of the book of Philippians. The survey of the book of Philippians. Lessons from the book of Philippians.

21 What is it for you to live? Philippians 1:21. What holds you back? What can you do In Christ? Philippians 3:13. Philippians 4:13.

22 When Paul came to Philippi, the message he preached is the same message that must be preached today. Examples like Lydia and the jailer realized their need and obeyed and became a part of the Lord’s body. Will you obey the message Paul preached and the message the Philippians obeyed?


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