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“Affirmative action is not an isolated program to be delegated to the EO Office and forgotten. Instead, it must involve the entire campus community and,

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Presentation on theme: "“Affirmative action is not an isolated program to be delegated to the EO Office and forgotten. Instead, it must involve the entire campus community and,"— Presentation transcript:

1 “Affirmative action is not an isolated program to be delegated to the EO Office and forgotten. Instead, it must involve the entire campus community and, to succeed, must be supported by administrators beginning with those at the very top.” -- Affirmative Action in Higher Education: A Source Book

2 Office for Institutional Equity “Making a Difference” Carson C. Cook Director

3 Why Rename the Office? “Affirmative Action” does not reflect the full scope of responsibilities assigned to the Office (not just a complaint office). Responsibility for the University’s diversity efforts has been reassigned to another office. Current trend among peer institutions. TBR has recommended renaming campus “Affirmative Action Officers” to “Equity Officers.”

4 What is the Role of the Office? Developing and implementing policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with all applicable local, state and federal laws and regulations; Advising and assisting the President, Senior Administrative Officers and the University community on matters involving equal opportunity; Providing access and reasonable accommodations to employees and applicants with disabilities consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA);

5 What is the Role of the Office? Investigating and resolving allegations of unlawful harassment and/or discrimination; Monitoring recruitment efforts and selection decisions, and providing guidance in adhering to U of M’s nondiscrimination and equal opportunity guidelines; Communicating the University’s commitment through training and education programs on harassment and discrimination prevention, and other equal opportunity/ADA topics.

6 Recruitment Outreach (Conducting search committee briefings) Developing Strategic Alliances (Establishing an EO Advisory Committee) Revising/updating the online Title VI and Title IX training modules Partnering with HR and Legal to develop a “Performance Management” training module for supervisors/managers FY Goals/Objectives

7 Communicating awareness of OIE via Town Hall meetings, enhanced presence on the Internet and disseminating a quarterly newsletter Marketing and branding OIE via informational materials and brochures Updating applicable EEO/AA policies and procedures Reconstituting and convening the ADA Committee FY Goals/Objectives

8 a) The Narrative Statement (a description of the University’s EEO/AA related programs and activities) b) The Statistical Analyses Workforce Analysis (who are we?) Availability Analysis (who’s out there?) Incumbency v. Availability Analysis (how do we compare?) Goals & Timetables (what are we going to do?) Affirmative Action Planning Process

9 On November 1, 2012, the University’s permanent full time active employee headcount was 2,561. Women constitute more than half or 55% of the University’s permanent full time workforce. Women also comprise 49.9 % of the employees categorized as Executives, Administrators and Managers. Minorities represent 35.6 % of the University’s total full time workforce. Of this total, Blacks represent 28.7%, and Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans represent 1%, 5.6%, and 0.1%, respectively. Employee Headcounts

10 Women hold 43% of the instructional faculty positions on campus but represent only 18.8% of the tenured faculty. On the other hand women hold 52.9% of the non-tenure track faculty positions on campus. Blacks constitute 8% of the employees categorized as executives/administrators compared to 82% of the service/maintenance workers on campus. Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans are all under represented in each of the employee job groups, e.g. executives, faculty, professional staff, clerical staff, etc. Employee Headcounts

11 Designing and implementing an effective AAP requires sustained attention. Placement goals are important, but demonstrating that a “good faith efforts” to achieve those goals is more important. As a federal contractor, U of M must be able to show that it has taken vigorous, active, measurable steps to address the problems while monitoring the effectiveness of its program. Good Faith Efforts

12 Unit Action Plans In order to develop a results oriented AAP designed to correct identified problems and attain placement goals, each Division/College will be asked to complete a Unit Action Plan (UAP). UAP’s should include the following information: a) a brief description of the problem(s) b) specific activities that will be carried out c) who will be responsible for implementation d) timeline for completing major benchmarks

13 Search Committee Briefings Aggressive recruitment techniques are needed to obtain a diverse applicant pool from which to select new faculty, staff, and administrators. Search committees are often unfamiliar with changes in hiring policies, procedures, and practices. Content focuses on diversifying applicant pools, eliminating biases and missteps in the recruitment and selection process, and sharing “best practices” for conducting an effective search Briefings are recommended for all tenure and tenure track faculty positions and professional staff positions at Director’s level and above.

14 Questions and Answers

15 Carson C. Cook Director Office for Institutional Equity 156 Administration Building Phone: Fax: For Additional Information

16 Department of Human Resources Office of Employee Relations and Engagement Performance Management

17 Policies and Procedures Online Access Available at: Policies and Procedures in part supported by the Office of Employee Relations and Engagement: Performance Appraisal/Performance Management Performance Improvement Process (PIP) Grievance Process and Conflict Resolution Workplace Violence Prevention Drug-free Campus and Alcohol Prevention Employee Separation Online procedures supersedes previous publications Policies do not constitute an employer/employee contract

18 Performance Management Cycle Set Performance Standards Identify Goals and Expectations Monitor Employee Performance Feedback Performance appraisal reference guide Online performance appraisal https://bf.memphis.edu/performance

19 Performance Improvement Process Available to non-faculty, hourly paid employees who have completed six months of employment General Employment Related Counseling Level I, II, III (probationary periods) Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Training and Development

20 Grievance Process and Conflict Resolution Formal complaint about matters such as demotions, suspensions w/o pay and terminations for cause Work Assignments that Violate Federal Law or Inconsistent Application of TBR Policy Two types of hearings –Presidential Panel –TUAPA (Tennessee Uniform Administrative Hearing Act (facilitated by Office of Legal Counsel)

21 Deans, Chairs, & Directors Meeting Legal Issues September 13, 2013 Melanie Murry Associate University Counsel

22 Conflict Resolution Workplace conflicts not addressed through the formal grievance process Available to faculty and staff Facilitated by Human Resources No hearings available

23 Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Personal and Emotional Concerns Chemical Dependency Occupational Stress Family and Marital Problems Legal and Financial Issues Available 24 hours a day

24 Q & A

25 Deans, Chairs, & Directors Meeting Legal Issues September 13, 2013 Melanie Murry Associate University Counsel

26 To Contact Us Office of Employee Relations & Engagement 176 Administration Building (901) or (901)

27 Conflict of Interest UM 1692 When the personal interest of an employee actually or potentially diverges from the person’s professional obligations to, and from the best interest of, the University.

28 Example: Self Dealing Examples: 1. Includes using research dollars from a sponsor to purchase property from a vendor where you or a family member have a financial interest; 2. Requiring students to purchase educational materials in which you have a financial interest (note that there is a way to “manage” this conflict by getting the proper approval for use of the materials); 3. Approval of University transactions involving yourself or a family member. This includes approval of your own time!

29 Example: Inappropriate Use of Students or Support Staff Work expected of a faculty member includes research and service (including refereeing journals, etc.) and thus is part of University business. But, University personnel should not be used to do work for an independent business or asked to wash a car, pick up laundry or do other personal tasks. University employees should not be engaged in non- University business other than on an incidental or minimal basis while at work.

30 What is a Conflict of Commitment? UM 1490 When the personal or other non-University related activities of an employee of the University impair the ability of that employee to meet their commitments of time and energy to the University.

31 Examples 1.Faculty members/administrative professionals are permitted one day per month of outside employment without permission. More time than that requires permission. 2.Clerical/Support Staff do not need specific approval, but must not take a position that interferes with their University work time or with the reputation of the University. It behooves staff to seek approval, even though not required.

32 Things to Remember You should not put your personal interests or time ahead of the interests and work of the University! (at least not when you are on University time or dealing with University business!)

33 33 What’s in your inbox?

34 34 Best Practices Do not include personal messages in business . Make sure you read the entire string before forwarding. Remember every business is a University document that is subject to the TN Open Records Act. –The Office of Legal Counsel reviews all documents before they are released. Think of your message as a memo generated on University letterhead: –Always ask the question: would I send this out on University letterhead? –Do I want to read about this in the paper? –If you have to think twice, pick up the phone. When reviewing your files for retention/disposal, also review your s. Most importantly, review your before it is sent and make sure you have the correct recipient!

35 “What do I do if …”

36 What do I do if … The department is having a reception off campus and the building owner wants me to sign a document, which has language that the University takes all responsibility for what happens or,

37 What do I do if … I have a student exhibiting disturbing behavior.

38 What do I do if... I have a student volunteer in my department working on a project or, I take a group of students on an outing to the Dixon.

39 What do I do if... I have a student who asks for additional time on a test?

40 What do I do if … I don’t know whether there is a University policy on a particular topic? Even after looking at University and TBR policy, I don’t know what to do?

41 41 QUESTIONS

42 6 Year Cohort Project Fall 2013 Update The Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Programs Office of Institutional Research

43 Action Steps Communications with Deans, Chairs, Directors Communications with Advisors Communications with Students

44 DO YOU KNOW HOW CLOSE YOU ARE TO GRADUATING? We recently realized that you are pretty close to graduation, and we wanted to make sure you know so that you can finalize your plans to graduate. Please contact your advisor to talk about it. In the meantime, check out the plan for graduation in UMdegree (planner tab). We mapped it out!! See instructions at: hp

45 Six-Year Graduation Rates: Recent History COHORT STUDENTS (First-Time Full Time Fall) 6 Year %

46 Six-Year Graduation Rate: Reaching our Stretch Goal of 44% COHORT STUDENTS (First-Time Full Time Fall) Deadline for 6 Year Total Graduates needed for 44% Graduated by August Year % as of August Aug

47 Six-Year Graduation Rate: To Reach a Goal of 45% COHORT STUDENTS (First-Time Full Time Fall) Deadline for 6 Year Total Graduates needed for 45% Graduated by August Year % as of August 2013 Enrolled Fall 2013 Additional students needed to graduate for 45% Aug Aug Aug < Aug Aug

48 Six-Year Graduation Rate: Stretching to 50% COHORT STUDENTS (First-Time Full Time Fall) Deadline for 6 Year Total Graduates needed for 50% Graduated by August Year % as of August 2013 Enrolled Fall 2013 Additional students needed to graduate for 50% Aug Aug Aug < Aug Aug

49 Expectations… COHORT Additional Students needed to graduate for 45% Additional Students needed to graduate for 50% Additional Students needed to graduate for 55% Filed for Dec 2013 Graduation Filed for May 2014 Graduation Deadline for 6 year Aug Aug Aug 2016


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