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A guide for teachers and personal tutors. College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism The effects of terrorism and violent extremism have an impact.

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Presentation on theme: "A guide for teachers and personal tutors. College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism The effects of terrorism and violent extremism have an impact."— Presentation transcript:

1 A guide for teachers and personal tutors

2 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism The effects of terrorism and violent extremism have an impact on everyone in society, including young people. Young people from all backgrounds need to be empowered to discuss matters relating to terrorism and preventing violent extremism on their own terms. ‘We need more support for teachers who are dealing with such sensitive subjects. As a Muslim myself, to deal with extremism, we have to incorporate all faiths in these discussions. Teachers should be given support and materials which they can use to achieve this.’ Usman Nawaz, age 18, Member of UK Youth Parliament for Rochdale

3 College tutor Guide to Prevent Violent Extremism This guide seeks to: Raise awareness amongst teaching staff of the threat from violent extremist groups and the risks for young people Provide information about what can cause violent extremism, locally and nationally and about where you can get additional information and advice Help you to understand the positive contribution you can make to empowering young people to create a College and local communities that are more resilient to extremism, and protecting the wellbeing of our students who may be vulnerable to being drawn into violent extremist activity Provide advice on managing risks that might have an impact on our college and wider community

4 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Five strands to understanding 1. understand how an extremist narrative which can lead to harm can be safely and sensitively challenged by staff to enable students to understand how diverse views can be heard, analysed and challenged in a way which values freedom of speech and freedom from harm 2. understand how to prevent harm to students by individuals, groups or others who promote violent extremism 3. understand how to support individuals who are vulnerable through strategies to support, challenge and protect

5 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Five strands to understanding 4. increase the resilience of students and of our college and local communities through helping students acquire skills that will enable them to make an informed, knowledgable and mature choice through debate and dialogue that challenge extremist views, and promotes an ethos that values respect for others 5. use teaching styles and curriculum opportunities which allow grievances to be aired, explored and that demonstrate the role of conflict resolution and active citizenship and respect for one another. 94 per cent of young people think places of learning are the best environment in which to discuss preventing terrorism and violent extremism UK Youth Parliament survey published in August 2008

6 College tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Understanding the threat National threats The Government assesses that the UK is a high priority target for international terrorists aligned with Al Qaida and is likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. In practice this means A threat from British nationals and UK-based terrorists as well as from foreign terrorists planning attacks from abroad. The majority of violent extremist networks are located in major urban conurbations such as London, Greater Manchester and the West Midlands. However recent arrests in Bristol and Exeter also demonstrate that violent extremists are widely distributed across the UK.

7 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Understanding the threat In addition to the severe threat posed by Al Qaida-influenced groups, dissident Irish republican terrorist groups who oppose the Northern Ireland peace process still pose a threat to British interests. Other UK-based extremist groups including racist and fascist organisations and far-right extremist groups also pose a threat to public order and the British multicultural way of life. These groups often aspire to campaigns of violence against individuals, families and particular communities and, if unchecked, may provide a catalyst for alienation and disaffection within particular ethnic communities. Evidence suggests that the route to violent far-right extremism often begins with organisations seeking to recruit young people and even arranging specific training activities that include encouraging the use of guns and knives.

8 College Tutor Guide to preventing Violent extremism : Key Points Experience suggests there is no typical profile of UK- based violent extremists influenced by Al Qaida. They can come from a range of geographical areas, from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds The nature of support for violent extremist activity varies but can include recruiting others, training, fundraising and procurement of support for terrorist activities. Training can include outward-bound type courses to encourage bonding either in the UK or in camps operated by Al Qaida overseas.

9 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism :Understanding Recruitment Methodology Violent extremists of all persuasions usually attract people to their cause through a persuasive narrative: To explain why I/my family/my community am/are experiencing disadvantage/suffering/lack of respect e.g. perceived persecution, inequality, oppression by a governing class, national or international politics to explain why the conventional family/education/community solutions do not provide answers to the core grievances e.g. ‘the law does not protect us, my family is isolated from ‘real life’ and does not know what it is like for young people’

10 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism :Understanding Recruitment Methodology and then go on to justify violent or criminal remedies – either in local, or national settings e.g. ‘we need to force a change of views, the only way to achieve change is through action’ or ‘we need to avenge a wrong we have suffered’ in some cases the cause is part of a wider global movement which may claim a political, ideological or theological basis, however distorted Extremist narratives have the potential to influence views to varying degrees: inspiring new recruits, helping to embed beliefs of those with established extreme views, or persuading others of the legitimacy of their cause.

11 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism :Understanding Recruitment Methodology and then go on to justify violent or criminal remedies – either in local, or national settings e.g. ‘we need to force a change of views, the only way to achieve change is through action’ or ‘we need to avenge a wrong we have suffered’ in some cases the cause is part of a wider global movement which may claim a political, ideological or theological basis, however distorted Extremist narratives have the potential to influence views to varying degrees: inspiring new recruits, helping to embed beliefs of those with established extreme views, or persuading others of the legitimacy of their cause.

12 What can make a young person susceptible to adopting extremist views and supporting violence? There is no single profile of a person likely to become involved in extremism, or single indicator of when a person might move to adopt violence in support of extremist ideas. However it does appear the decision by a young person to become involved in violent extremism: May begin with a search for answers to questions about identity, faith and belonging May be driven by the desire for ‘adventure’ and excitement May be driven by a desire to enhance the self esteem of the individual and promote their ‘street cred’ Is likely to involve identification with a charismatic individual and attraction to a group which can offer identity, social network and support is likely to be fuelled by a sense of grievance that can be triggered by personal experiences of racism or discrimination

13 Factors that may make Young People susceptible to exploitation by violent extremists: Identity crisis : Young people exploring issues of identity can feel both distant from their parents’ cultural and religious heritage and uncomfortable with their place in society around them. Extremist ideas can help provide a sense of purpose or feeling of belonging. Personal crisis This may for example include significant tensions within the family which produce a sense of isolation of the young person from the traditional certainties of family life. Personal circumstances The experience of migration, local tensions or events affecting families in countries of origin may contribute to alienation from UK values and a decision to cause harm to symbols of the community or state.

14 Factors that may make Young People susceptible to exploitation by violent extremists: Un- or underemployment Young people may perceive their aspirations for career and lifestyle undermined by limited educational achievement or employment prospects. This can translate to a generalised rejection of civic life and adoption of violence as a symbolic act. Criminality A young person may have been involved in group offending or, on occasion, linked to organised crime and be drawn to engagement in extremist, potentially criminal, activities.

15 College Tutor Guide to preventing Violent extremism : Key Points Extremists use persuasive narratives to attract people to their cause based on a particular Interpretation or distortion of history, politics or religion. Pedagogy can play a powerful role in encouraging young people to challenge ideas, think for themselves and take responsibility for their actions. There is no obvious profile of a person likely to become involved in extremism, or single indicator of when a person might move to adopt violence in support of extremist ideas.

16 College Tutor Guide to preventing Violent extremism : Key Points The starting point, as in all learning, is knowing your students listening and responding to their changing needs. If you do have concerns about behaviour patterns, you should seek advice from your head of School and/or the designated safeguarding officer Use Your professional judgement to consider whether a young person might be at risk.

17 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : What Can I do? General :You can help by promoting the Every Learner Matters (ELM) outcomes for your students promoting student wellbeing, equalities and College community cohesion

18 College tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : What Can I do? Specific: You can help by o Building on what you already do by incorporating when able to do so into lesson plans opportunities for dialogue and discussion around current news topics and current issues of concern and social justice. Help students to develop skills needed to evaluate effectively and discuss potentially controversial issues in a safe and respectful environment. Provide a safe space where students are able to discuss openly issues that concern them about their identities, and how this relates to the diversity of the communities from which they come from.

19 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : What Can I do? Provide opportunities for your students to understand, meet and engage with people from different backgrounds in ways that promote the common values of ‘Respect’ while recognising the diversity within our own college and wider communities. Ask the question where does this fit into the teaching and learning that is taking place? Actively seek from students different viewpoints and work towards a common notion of what is right or wrong and so doing giving an opportunity for those who may feel marginalised a voice to be heard and respected.

20 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Student support and Challenge Responsibilities The professional standards for teachers, contractual and safeguarding frameworks for all adults working with children and young people, and the ELM outcomes for young people all require the exercise of a duty of care and, where necessary, the taking of actions for safeguarding and crime prevention. This includes: challenging unacceptable behaviour such as racism or bullying that can impact on the wellbeing of an individual or groups of pupils and supporting those who may be vulnerable to being drawn into violent extremist activity.

21 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Student support and Challenge To ensure that we are fulfilling our duty of care we need to start of by knowing our students. Where they come from and any special needs they may have from religious observance to cultural differences that can be accommodated within the frame work of our college ethos and practice. The wider community that our students come from and listening and responding fairly and equitably to their changing needs.

22 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Student support and Challenge There are a number of signs that you may come across that may cause you concern they may include : Graffiti symbols, writing or art work promoting extremist messages or images. Students accessing extremist material online, including through social networking sites. Parental reports of changes in behaviour, friendship or actions and requests for assistance. Common framework partnerships reporting issues affecting students in our care. Students voicing opinions drawn from extremist ideologies and narratives. Use of extremist or ‘hate’ terms to exclude others or incite violence.

23 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Student support and Challenge Processes Responses could range from: Challenging inappropriate views expressed through classroom discussion Arranging through Estates for the immediate removal of race or religious hatred graffiti. Supporting students who are being bullied or made to feel different linking in with the college Student support staff. It may be that a student is facing multiple challenges in their life of which exposure to violent extremist influences whether in the community or on line is just one. Whatever you do, do not keep to yourself seek help and advice from your school leader, two professional heads are better then one and as often the case others may have additional information that makes taking the most appropriate action to support the student that much clearer.

24 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Student support and Challenge Processes Be aware of the support that the wider college can give to you and your students: Faith Guidance Mentoring Counselling Advice and further information via partners within the City’s common framework agreement

25 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Further Information Anti-defamation League Information on graphic and numerical symbols used by far-right groups. Educating Against Extremism – Lynn Davies, Trentham Books, 2008 Looks at the processes that can lead individuals to extreme beliefs or the use of violence and suggests ways in which education can help. Improvement and Development Agency (IDeA) The ‘knowledge’ section of the IDeA website provides policy updates, information, useful links and resources on preventing violent extremism. Security Service Information on the radicalisation process and extremist groups, including Al Qaida.

26 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Further Information Teaching, learning and the curriculum links 1001 Inventions A resource that looks at the heritage which the Muslim community share with other communities in the UK, Europe and across the World. Adapting the curriculum – QCA

27 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Further Information Defeating Organised Racial Hatred – Commission for Racial Equality Information to challenge common myths about people from minority groups. Defeating_organised_racial_hatred.pdf Diversity and Dialogue An online directory of projects and resources aimed at bringing young people from different faiths and backgrounds together. Global Citizenship Guides: Teaching Controversial Issues – Oxfam Strategies and activities to help teachers address controversial issues. Global Dimension – DEA A guide to resources which support global and intercultural understanding.

28 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Further Information The Holocaust Centre and Holocaust Educational Trust Outreach programmes and teaching materials to educate young people about the Holocaust and lessons to be learned on combating prejudice and racism. and Racism, anti-Semitism and Islamophobia – Teachernet Links to a variety of resources to support the school workforce in tackling issues of racism, anti-Semitism and Islamophobia.www.teachernet.gov.uk/wholeschool/behaviour/t acklingbullying/racistbullying/developing/racismantisemitism Radical Middle Way Information, resources and events aimed at articulating a relevant mainstream understanding of Islam that is proactive and relevant to young British Muslims.

29 College Tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Further Information Respect For All – QCA A range of whole school and subject related guidance and resources on valuing diversityand challenging racism through the curriculum.www.qca.org.uk/qca_6753.aspx Schools Linking Network A website that allows schools to seek a linking partner online, with support. Teaching about controversial issues – Teachernet Guidelines for handling controversial issues, both in the classroom and in informal conversations with pupils, drawing on recent publications in this area. ullying/racistbullying/preventing/controversialissues

30 College tutor guide to Preventing Violent Extremism : Further Information Watch Over Me – Miss Dorothy.comWeb presence and teaching materials designed to help children handle risk. Copies of the ‘Watch Over Me’ DVD resources are available free to schools, enquiries should be addressed to


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