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Chapter 10 The Labor Union and the Supervisor. Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © 2001 11-2 1.Explain why and how labor.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 10 The Labor Union and the Supervisor. Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © 2001 11-2 1.Explain why and how labor."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 10 The Labor Union and the Supervisor

2 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © Explain why and how labor unions continue to affect organizations and the supervisory position. 2. Identify aspects of good management that are likely to deter a union organizer’s appeal. 3.Outline procedures for supervisors to follow if confronted with a union-organizing effort. 4.Discuss the importance of good union- management relationships and the supervisor’s key role in maintaining them. 1.Explain why and how labor unions continue to affect organizations and the supervisory position. 2. Identify aspects of good management that are likely to deter a union organizer’s appeal. 3.Outline procedures for supervisors to follow if confronted with a union-organizing effort. 4.Discuss the importance of good union- management relationships and the supervisor’s key role in maintaining them. After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

3 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © Discuss the limited but important role of the supervisor in negotiating the labor agreement. 6. Discuss the major role of the supervisor in the interpretation and application of the labor agreement at the departmental level. 7.Describe the nature and importance of a good relationship between a supervisor and the union shop steward. 5.Discuss the limited but important role of the supervisor in negotiating the labor agreement. 6. Discuss the major role of the supervisor in the interpretation and application of the labor agreement at the departmental level. 7.Describe the nature and importance of a good relationship between a supervisor and the union shop steward. After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

4 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © WHY AND HOW LABOR UNIONS AFFECT ORGANIZATIONS Labor union (labor organization) —Legally recognized organization that represents employees and negotiates and administers a labor agreement with an employer Labor agreement (union contract) — Negotiated document between union and employer that covers terms and conditions of employment for the represented employees Labor union (labor organization) —Legally recognized organization that represents employees and negotiates and administers a labor agreement with an employer Labor agreement (union contract) — Negotiated document between union and employer that covers terms and conditions of employment for the represented employees What is a labor union and labor agreement? 1

5 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © WHY AND HOW LABOR UNIONS AFFECT ORGANIZATIONS Most unionized employees are members of local unions, which are affiliated with national and international labor organizations. The American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) is the dominant federation of national and international unions. The private sector workforce may unionize under the National Labor Relations Act; federal workers may unionize under the Civil Service Reform Act. Unions’ historically adversarial approach toward employers has become more cooperative in many companies. Most unionized employees are members of local unions, which are affiliated with national and international labor organizations. The American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) is the dominant federation of national and international unions. The private sector workforce may unionize under the National Labor Relations Act; federal workers may unionize under the Civil Service Reform Act. Unions’ historically adversarial approach toward employers has become more cooperative in many companies. The Labor Relations Framework 1

6 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © WHY AND HOW LABOR UNIONS AFFECT ORGANIZATIONS Unionized employees have divided loyalties concerning their unions and their employers. Many firms have human resources staff specialists to handle labor relations matters. Some labor relations matters will not directly concern the typical supervisor. Supervisors are usually quite involved when employees attempt to unionize, and with union activities in a firm in which the employees are already unionized. Unionized employees have divided loyalties concerning their unions and their employers. Many firms have human resources staff specialists to handle labor relations matters. Some labor relations matters will not directly concern the typical supervisor. Supervisors are usually quite involved when employees attempt to unionize, and with union activities in a firm in which the employees are already unionized. Labor Relations and the Supervisor 1

7 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © ASPECTS OF GOOD MANAGEMENT LIKELY TO DETER A UNION ORGANIZER’S APPEAL Unions are said to be a direct response to failure of management to respond the employee needs. Certain factors make the work environment unfavorable for unionization. Including: 1.Good and comparable wages and benefits 2.Satisfactory or improving personal facilities for employees 3.Stable employment pattern 4.Supervisors who treat employees with dignity and respect Unions are said to be a direct response to failure of management to respond the employee needs. Certain factors make the work environment unfavorable for unionization. Including: 1.Good and comparable wages and benefits 2.Satisfactory or improving personal facilities for employees 3.Stable employment pattern 4.Supervisors who treat employees with dignity and respect 2

8 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © ASPECTS OF GOOD MANAGEMENT LIKELY TO DETER A UNION ORGANIZER’S APPEAL 5.Well-trained employees who see opportunity for advancement 6.A participative approach to management 7.Opportunities for employees to resolve complaints through a complaint procedure When these needs are met, employees feel less desire to unionize. 5.Well-trained employees who see opportunity for advancement 6.A participative approach to management 7.Opportunities for employees to resolve complaints through a complaint procedure When these needs are met, employees feel less desire to unionize. 2

9 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © UNION SECURITY ARRANGEMENTS Closed shop —Requires an individual to be a union member in order to obtain a job. Prohibited by federal law in the United States. Union shop —Labor agreement provision in which employees are required to join the union as a condition of employment. The terms Closed shop and Union shop are sometimes used interchangeably, but are in fact different from each other. Agency shop —Employee does not have to join the union, but is required to pay a fee equivalent to union dues; the union must represent the employee. 21 “right-to-work” states prohibit the union shop and the agency shop. Closed shop —Requires an individual to be a union member in order to obtain a job. Prohibited by federal law in the United States. Union shop —Labor agreement provision in which employees are required to join the union as a condition of employment. The terms Closed shop and Union shop are sometimes used interchangeably, but are in fact different from each other. Agency shop —Employee does not have to join the union, but is required to pay a fee equivalent to union dues; the union must represent the employee. 21 “right-to-work” states prohibit the union shop and the agency shop. 2

10 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © PROCEDURES TO FOLLOW IF CONFRONTED WITH A UNION-ORGANIZING EFFORT Most organizing activity still occurs on a person-to-person basis. During a union- organizing period, supervisors: 1.should not question employees about union-organizing activities. 2.should not make threats or promises related to unionization. 3.should respond in a neutral manner when asked for opinions on unionization. Most organizing activity still occurs on a person-to-person basis. During a union- organizing period, supervisors: 1.should not question employees about union-organizing activities. 2.should not make threats or promises related to unionization. 3.should respond in a neutral manner when asked for opinions on unionization. 3

11 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © PROCEDURES TO FOLLOW IF CONFRONTED WITH A UNION-ORGANIZING EFFORT 4.can prohibit union-organizing activities in work areas during work hours and activities that interfere with work operations. 5.should not look at union authorization cards that employees may have signed. 6.should continue to do the best supervisory job possible. 4.can prohibit union-organizing activities in work areas during work hours and activities that interfere with work operations. 5.should not look at union authorization cards that employees may have signed. 6.should continue to do the best supervisory job possible. 3

12 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE IMPORTANCE OF GOOD UNION-MANAGEMENT RELATIONSHIPS It is in management’s best interest to develop a union-management climate conducive to constructive relationships. The supervisor’s role in union-management relations consists of: a limited role in negotiating the labor agreement, and a major role in applying the terms of the agreement on a day-to-day basis. It is in management’s best interest to develop a union-management climate conducive to constructive relationships. The supervisor’s role in union-management relations consists of: a limited role in negotiating the labor agreement, and a major role in applying the terms of the agreement on a day-to-day basis. 4

13 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE LIMITED ROLE IN NEGOTIATING THE LABOR AGREEMENT ) — Labor agreement negotiations (collective bargaining) —Process of discussion and compromise between labor and management leading to an agreement governing wages, hours, and working conditions. Negotiations are often held away from company premises. Supervisors should: have some influence on negotiations because they bear responsibility for carry out provisions of the agreement. be prepared to provide and substantiate information about their departments that would impact negotiations and agreements. ) — Labor agreement negotiations (collective bargaining) —Process of discussion and compromise between labor and management leading to an agreement governing wages, hours, and working conditions. Negotiations are often held away from company premises. Supervisors should: have some influence on negotiations because they bear responsibility for carry out provisions of the agreement. be prepared to provide and substantiate information about their departments that would impact negotiations and agreements. 5

14 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE MAJOR ROLE IN NEGOTIATING THE LABOR AGREEMENT Most labor agreements cover: wages wages benefits benefits working conditions working conditions hours of work hours of work overtime overtime holidays holidays wages wages benefits benefits working conditions working conditions hours of work hours of work overtime overtime holidays holidays vacations vacations leaves of absence leaves of absence seniority seniority grievance procedures grievance procedures other matters other matters vacations vacations leaves of absence leaves of absence seniority seniority grievance procedures grievance procedures other matters other matters be The agreement must be applied with appropriate and intelligent supervisory decisions; the best-written agreement will be of little value if it is poorly applied. 6

15 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE MAJOR ROLE IN NEGOTIATING THE LABOR AGREEMENT Supervisors must manage their departments within the framework of the labor agreement. Supervisors should not ignore agreement requirements, even if compliance causes the supervisor problems. Supervisors should ask for clarification for any provisions of the agreement they do not understand. Supervisors must manage their departments within the framework of the labor agreement. Supervisors should not ignore agreement requirements, even if compliance causes the supervisor problems. Supervisors should ask for clarification for any provisions of the agreement they do not understand. Compliance with the labor agreement 6

16 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE MAJOR ROLE IN NEGOTIATING THE LABOR AGREEMENT A supervisor’s job must be performed within the framework of the union. Although labor agreements do not take away all managerial rights, they provide for the union to be able to challenge a supervisor’s decision. Adjustments for the union 6

17 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE MAJOR ROLE IN NEGOTIATING THE LABOR AGREEMENT The supervisor is responsible for applying the agreement to specific situations. If the supervisor makes an error in judgment or execution of the labor agreement, it is grounds for a grievance. Grievance—a formal complaint presented by the union to management that alleges a violation of the labor agreement. The supervisor is responsible for applying the agreement to specific situations. If the supervisor makes an error in judgment or execution of the labor agreement, it is grounds for a grievance. Grievance—a formal complaint presented by the union to management that alleges a violation of the labor agreement. Supervisory decision making and the labor agreement 6

18 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE MAJOR ROLE IN NEGOTIATING THE LABOR AGREEMENT Supervisors should be sure employees observe the provisions of the labor agreement. Inaction on the supervisor’s part could be interpreted to mean the provision has been set aside. Maintaining employees’ compliance with the labor agreement 7

19 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE IMPORTANCE OF A GOOD RELATIONSHIP WITH THE UNION SHOP STEWARD Shop steward —Employee elected or appointed to represent employees at the departmental level, particularly in grievance processing Union business representative —Paid official of the local or national union who may be involved in grievance processing Shop steward —Employee elected or appointed to represent employees at the departmental level, particularly in grievance processing Union business representative —Paid official of the local or national union who may be involved in grievance processing Who is the supervisor’s union contact? 7

20 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © THE IMPORTANCE OF A GOOD RELATIONSHIP WITH THE UNION SHOP STEWARD The shop steward’s major responsibility is to process complaints and grievances on behalf of employees. Supervisors should recognize that shop stewards know the thinking of the employees and the content of the labor agreement. Because a shop steward will be “on the offensive” in a grievance matter, the supervisor must be ready to respond with a justification or remedy for the issue. Shop stewards and supervisors must keep a sound relationship for the best interest of the employees and the company. The shop steward’s major responsibility is to process complaints and grievances on behalf of employees. Supervisors should recognize that shop stewards know the thinking of the employees and the content of the labor agreement. Because a shop steward will be “on the offensive” in a grievance matter, the supervisor must be ready to respond with a justification or remedy for the issue. Shop stewards and supervisors must keep a sound relationship for the best interest of the employees and the company. 7

21 Chapter 11/The Labor Union and the Supervisor Hilgert & Leonard © END


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