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Getting to grips with employment Shirley Briggs PEACe Manager London Voluntary Service Council 0207 832 5880 Mon. to Thurs.

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Presentation on theme: "Getting to grips with employment Shirley Briggs PEACe Manager London Voluntary Service Council 0207 832 5880 Mon. to Thurs."— Presentation transcript:

1 Getting to grips with employment Shirley Briggs PEACe Manager London Voluntary Service Council Mon. to Thurs.

2 Objectives for the day  Are my paid workers employees?  What should a contract of employment include?  What policies and procedures should we have?  What is performance management?  What should the employer do when things go wrong?  Where can I get more information?

3 Who are your workers?

4 Keep it simple – treat all your paid workers as self-employed.

5 Why is it important to get it right? Individual’s rights HMRC Employment tribunal Charity Commission !

6 Is there mutuality of obligation? Are they under the employer’s control? Do they need to deliver the work personally? Do they use the employer’s equipment or their own? Do they run any financial risk or can they make a profit?

7 Who are your workers? Employees Full-time Part-time Temporary or fixed term Contract of service Must do work personally Under control of employer in how they carry out the work

8 Who are your workers? Self employed staff Contract for services They decide on how the service is delivered Often can send a replacement Likely to use own equipment Run a financial risk

9 Who are your workers? Workers e.g. Casual workers Can refuse work Organisation does not have to provide work Some rights HMRC = employees But must do work personally

10 Who are your workers? Volunteers Work experience Interns Placements Unpaid Only legitimate out-of-pocket expenses reimbursed

11 calcs/esi.htm HMRC Employment Status Indicator

12 A written statement of particulars (for all employees working for more than 1 month) must be issued within 8 weeks of their starting work.

13 Contract of employment Even if nothing is written down a contract of employment may still exist! Contracts consist of: Offer – usually from the employer Acceptance – written, verbal or simply by just turning up for work Consideration – something for value in return e.g. money

14 The Contract Terms Express Terms subject to acceptance by the employer and worker Implied Terms would have been agreed had they discussed them Statutory Terms exist as a consequence of Acts of parliament

15 What should be included in a contract of employment? Name of employer and employee Date when employment began Expiry date for fixed term contracts Job title and brief description Address of place of work Hours of work Rate of pay and when it is to be paid Holiday entitlement

16 What should be included in a contract of employment? Sickness details – or separate written policy Rules relating to dismissal, discipline, grievance and appeals procedures or where these can be found Notice period for leaving or ending the job Collective agreements Details of any pension

17 What employment policies and procedures must an organisation have?

18 What about performance management?

19 Performance Management Who is going to do it? What happens during a probationary period? What happens in a supervision meeting? What happens in an appraisal meeting?

20 Performance Management A new member of staff has been working at your organisation for three weeks. They have already made a number of mistakes in their work. How should the line manager handle the situation?

21 If it’s not working out you can dismiss the employee.

22 Dismissal There are 5 fair reasons to dismiss someone. What are they?

23 What is redundancy? It is a form of dismissal The reason for the dismissal is: –The employer has ceased or intends to cease to carry on the business for which the employee was employed or to carry on that business in the place where the employee was employed OR –The requirements of the business for employees to carry out work of a particular kind, or to carry it out in the place in which they are employed have ceased or diminished, or are expected to cease or diminish.

24 Fixed-term contracts just expire. Easy.

25 Fixed term contracts Non-renewal of a fixed term contract is still a dismissal. Therefore what is the reason for the dismissal?

26 ACAS Code of Practice for Discipline and Grievance

27 Key principles of a fair disciplinary or dismissal procedure Investigate Invite the employee to a face-to-face meeting and allow them to put their case Allow the employee to be accompanied by a work companion or trade union representative Only decide after the meeting Allow the employee the right to appeal against the decision Use appropriate penalties

28 Conduct v Capability A team member who is not coping with his workload and additional duties following a recent reorganisation? A new staff member who is not meeting her performance targets but who is awaiting skills training? A member of staff who is under-performing because they are frequently late into work without good reason? A long-serving employee who has been absent for a lengthy period due to a genuine sickness?

29 Discipline – how would you deal with these situations? 1.The manager has just spotted that the administrator is not working on her computer but visiting Facebook, the social networking site. 2.A project co-ordinator is repeatedly late. He has already been informally warned about his poor timekeeping on two occasions by his line manager. On this particular morning, he has arrived one hour late, keeping a client waiting. 3.The director is witnessed by a member of the management committee arguing with and hitting out at an employee from another organisation who shares the office space.

30 Handling a grievance fairly Invite the employee to a face-to-face meeting and allow them to state their case Allow the employee to be accompanied by a work companion or trade union representative Investigate Only decide after the meeting and any investigation Allow the employee the right to appeal against the decision

31 Grievance – how would you deal with these situations? 1.In a supervision meeting, the staff member says that he feels unsure about what he is supposed to do and that he feels unsupported at work. 2.One of the teaching staff complains that another is bullying her. She s her manager with details of occasions when she feels bullying behaviour was shown. 3.An employee has resigned. In his resignation letter to the Chair of the Management Committee, he complains that he was not allowed emergency time off when his elderly father was taken ill.

32 Sickness Absence Do staff know what to do when they are off sick? Who do they report to? What evidence is required? What happens on return to work? Short-term sickness absence Long-term sickness absence Unauthorised absence

33 Where can I get more information? PEACe Helpline: Monday to Thursday ACAS GOV UK

34 Any questions? PEACe


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