Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

CHF Policies and Procedures Webinar January 2013.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "CHF Policies and Procedures Webinar January 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 CHF Policies and Procedures Webinar January 2013

2 Policies and Procedures Webinar Webinar will last approximately an hour and a half. Recording will be posted on CHFpartnership.org, along with slides. Audience members are “muted” due to the high number of participants.

3 Policies and Procedures Webinar If you have technical difficulty with the audio or video portions of this webcast, try:  Logging off, then logging in again  Our Typing the issue in the message board on the screen.

4 Policies and Procedures Webinar Resources – Interim Regulations – formingAmendments.pdf Resource Exchange – OHCD Website –

5 Policies and Procedures Webinar How to read Regulations May vs Shall vs Will vs Should Encouraged vs required Definitions:  Program participant - an individual or family who is assisted under CHF program.  Recipient – State/City.  Subrecipient – Non-for-profit program provider.

6

7

8

9

10

11 General Overview

12 Requirements apply to:  CHF-Funded Activities.  Not entire agency, just those programs with funding from CHF.  Shelter and Service Activities  Does not apply to HMIS or planning activities.

13 General Overview Program Intent Part of a Continuum of Resources Quickly Stabilize Housing Situations Positive Outcomes:  Increased program exits to permanent housing,  Increased client participation in mainstream resources,  Decreased length of shelter stays,  Elimination or reduction of repeated episodes of homelessness,  Increase income (employment and/or benefits) to clients, &  Decreased shelter program entries because of prevention or diversion efforts.

14 General Overview Program Philosophies Crisis intervention & Emergency Services Permanent housing services Case management services

15 General Overview Case Management: Identify service needs before the move into permanent housing; & Ensure clients have access to resources necessary to sustain permanent housing including:  Source of income;  Case management (to help solve problems that may arise that threaten the clients' tenancy);  Landlord/Tenant Education or Mediation; &  Connection with any other applicable community-based services (to meet long term support/service needs).

16 Eligible Activities

17 CHF Eligible Activities  Shelter Operations/Maintenance  Essential Services  Shelter Prevention and Shelter/Street Services  Shelter Improvements  HMIS Management & Coordination

18 Eligible Activities Ineligible Activities Depreciation, bad debts and late fees Recruitment, staff training, entertainment, conferences, and retreats Public relations or fundraising Any activities not explicitly detailed in this manual;

19 Eligible Activities Ineligible Activities Payment of client credit card or other consumer debt; Payment of client mortgage costs and mortgage arrears; Construction or rehabilitation (unless an award or written approval has been received from the CHF Partnership); &

20 Eligible Activities Ineligible Activities Tenant based rental and/or utility assistance (only allowed under IHSP) Support of administrative expenses, including but not limited to:  Administrative Personnel  Attendance of Conferences and Trainings  Space and other indirect costs associated with Administrative Personnel

21 Eligible Activities CHF Eligible Populations  There are two eligible populations identified for Consolidated Homeless Fund programs:* Homeless as defined by HUD (Categories 1 – 4) 1. Literally Homeless 2. Imminently homeless (within 14 days) 3. Unaccompanied youth/families who meet other Federal homeless definition (must also meet additional criteria for HUD, similar to 2) 4. Fleeing/attempting to flee Domestic Violence At risk of Homelessness as defined by HUD *Please refer to HUD’s full definition of homelessness and at risk of homelessness; what is listed above is only a summary.

22

23 Recordkeeping

24 See the recordkeeping webinar posted on

25 SHELTER OPERATIONS

26 Major Requirements –  Provide services for entire grant period.  Any family shelters/safe homes cannot deny entry to families with children under 18 on basis of age.  All family shelters, transitional housing facilities, and other shelters that utilize a waitlist that are funded under this activity must participate in Statewide Family Shelter Hotline and Waitlist (operated by 211).  All family shelters, transitional housing facilities, and other shelters will target their services to the most vulnerable families on the waitlist. Shelter Operations

27 FAMILY SHELTERS

28 Family Shelters CHF Family Shelter Providers have a typical length of stay around 4-6 months. A minimum of 50% of clients that exit activities funded under CHF will exit to Permanent Housing. No more than 10% of clients who exit activities funded under CHF will exit to Emergency Shelter. The average length of stay shall be 6 months. CHF Providers are prohibited from using the gender of parent as a basis for denying any family’s admission (including both male and female parents). Waivers may be requested, contact the CHF Partnership for more information.

29 Family Shelters All family shelters, transitional housing facilities, and other shelters that utilize a waitlist that are funded under this activity must participate in Statewide Family Shelter Hotline and Waitlist (operated by 211). All family shelters, transitional housing facilities, and other shelters will target their services to the most vulnerable families on the waitlist. CHF Providers are prohibited from using the age of a child (under 18) as a basis for denying any family’s admission (including both male and female children).

30 INDIVIDUAL SHELTERS

31 Individual Shelters CHF Emergency Shelter Providers have a typical length of stay around 2-4 months. CHF Transitional Housing Providers have a typical length of stay around 6-8 months. CHF Providers are prohibited from using sexual orientation and/or gender identity a basis for denying admission.

32 Individual Shelters A minimum of 20% of clients that exit activities funded under this contract will exit to Permanent Housing. No more than 25% of clients who exit activities funded under this contract will exit to Emergency Shelter. No more than 15% of clients who exit activities funded under this contract will exit to Unknown Destinations. The average length of stay shall be 6 months.

33 OPERATION FIRST STEP

34 Operation First Step Program OFS –  Community Based “Home-like”  INTENSIVE Case Management  Bridge to permanent housing. OFS: Return Home  Newly Homeless  Recent Exit from Institution  Quickly help client move to permanent housing

35 Operation First Step Program OFS: Almost Home  Medium to Long Term Homeless  Select Target Population: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and/or Transgender clients Clients with a History of Substance Abuse Clients with a History of Incarceration Clients with a History of Mental Health Issues Clients ages (Youth)

36 Operation First Step Program A minimum of 50% of clients that exit activities funded under this contract will exit to Permanent Housing. No more than 15% of clients who exit activities funded under this contract will exit to Emergency Shelter. The average length of stay shall be 4-6 months.

37 HOUSING FIRST

38 Housing First Housing First is a permanent supportive housing program. Centers on providing homeless people with permanent housing quickly and then providing services as needed. Obtain rental housing as quickly as possible and the housing is not time-limited Provide housing is not contingent on compliance with services.

39 ESSENTIAL SERVICES

40 Eligible Activities -  Case Management  Child Care  Education Services  Employment Assistance & Job Training  Outpatient Health Services  Legal Services  Life Skills  Mental Health Services  Substance Abuse Treatment Services  Transportation  Services for Special Populations  Street Outreach Eligible Population –  Individuals and families who are homeless.

41 ESSENTIAL SERVICES Major Requirements –  Provide services for the full grant year Year Round Programs: June 1, 2013 – May 30th, 2014  All clients entered into HMIS Ineligible Activities:  Any activities not detailed are assumed to be ineligible.  Any cost not directly associated with the supported activity.  Advocacy, planning, and organizational capacity building  Staff recruitment/training

42 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM

43 Eligible Categories of Assistance –  Shelter Prevention Statewide  Shelter/Street Services Statewide  Re-Housing targeting the Chronic Homeless Statewide

44 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Other Eligibility Requirements –  Client must be homeless but for this assistance (No other housing or financial resources available to them).  Client must be likely to sustain housing once assistance ends.  Client must be willing to participate in case management and financial counseling.  Client must meet income guidelines.

45 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Shelter Prevention Statewide  Target most likely to present at shelter/street.  Not necessarily those persons with the least housing barriers and/or those who are highly self-sufficient prior to the provision of IHSP services.  Estimated 3-6 months of financial assistance and up to 9 months of case management and financial counseling

46 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Shelter/Street Services Statewide  Target most likely sustain housing once assistance ends.  Estimated 6-9 months of financial assistance and up to 12 months of case management and financial counseling.

47 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Shelter/Street Services targeting the Chronically Homeless Statewide  Different from Shelter/Street Services, targets the longtime users of the system.  Estimated 3-6 months of outreach to engage and prepare clients for IHSP, then an estimated 6-12 months of financial assistance and up to 15 months of case management and financial counseling.

48 Service Standards

49 ANTIDISCRIMINATION

50 Anti-Discrimination CHF Providers are prohibited from using any of the following as a basis for denying any individuals admission into a CHF- Funded Program:  Age (40 and over)  Disability Status (Including prior Alcohol & Illegal Substance Addictions)  Ethnicity  DOMESTIC VIOLENCE/FAMILY SHELTERS ONLY - Familial Status (must be made available without regard to actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity, or marital status)  Gender  Gender Identity

51 Anti-Discrimination CHF Providers are prohibited from using any of the following as a basis for denying any individuals admission into a CHF-Funded Program:  Language(s) Spoken  Literacy  National Origin  Race/Color  Religion/Creed  Sexual Orientation  Veteran Status Additionally CHF Providers serving families are prohibited from using the age of a child (under 18) as a basis for denying any family’s admission (including both male and female children).

52 Anti-Discrimination Intake Procedures:  CHF providers must refrain from asking questions about disabilities, etc. during the intake process until they are admitted into the program.  After the initial intake process is complete, staff shall inform each guest that HMIS is voluntary and that any information gathered will not affect their ability to stay in the shelter/use the program.  After an applicant has been approved for admittance into the program (if the program offers case management), it is permissible to ask the person about disability and other health-related issues.  It is a good practice to have the post-acceptance questioning regarding disability by a supportive services staff member instead of a housing management staff member.

53 Anti-Discrimination Reasonable Accommodations:  A change in rules, policies or procedures to help people with disabilities access housing or housing-related services.  For example, a rental office that generally provides standard, printed rental applications could, as a reasonable accommodation to a person with a visual disability, provide a Braille version of the application, or provide assistance in filling it out.

54 Anti-Discrimination However, if providing the requested accommodation would:  Pose an undue financial or administrative burden on the shelter or housing provider, or  Fundamentally alter the nature of the program, the request is not “reasonable” Then it does not need to be granted. If a prospective person/household has requested a reasonable accommodation, CHF provider may ask for verification of the disability and may also request assurances from the person’s healthcare worker or case manager.

55 Anti-Discrimination A request for a reasonable accommodation shall be granted if the following conditions are met:  The person requesting it has a disability as defined by fair housing laws,  The requested accommodation is necessary to afford the person an equal opportunity to use and enjoy the dwelling and related services,  Complying with the request poses neither an undue administrative nor financial burden on the housing provider or program, and  Complying with the request will not fundamentally alter the nature of the program.

56 Antidiscrimination Recommending certain other programs to a person/household because they have a disability is called steering, and it is just as illegal as telling people of a certain race that they might be more comfortable in another part of town.

57 TRAINING & STAFF POLICIES

58 Staff & Training CHF Programs will have sufficient trained staff (either paid or volunteer) on-site and/or available (on call) during all hours in which clients occupy the premises. CHF Programs will work to train staff whenever possible on:  Infection control policy and procedures  First aid  CPR

59 Staff & Training CHF Programs shall provide direct line staff with training and/or materials regarding:  Emergency procedures for medical/psychiatric crises  Emergency procedures for natural disasters  Referral procedures to relevant community resources  Ethical Standards (Confidentiality, etc)  Other training relevant to the work to be performed

60 Staff & Training CHF Programs shall have written standards for ethical conduct of staff, which include but are not limited to:  Confidentiality  Respect for clients  Prohibition of borrowing and lending of money  Prohibition of sexual contact and exploitation  Prohibition of drug or alcohol use.

61 Staff & Training The shelter will provide appropriate professional supervision to all paid staff and volunteers on a regular basis. Direct supervision shall be provided for all interns and new staff, either paid or volunteer, with periodic evaluations of their performance.

62 RESIDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

63 Resident Rights and Responsibilities The CHF Programs will promote mutual respect among staff and clients, ensuring that the following client rights and responsibilities are upheld:  Clients will be protected from threats or intimidation by staff or other program participants.  Shelter residents will not be denied access to their own medications and/or appropriate medical treatment.  Shelters and residential programs will develop and implement a set of house rules and resident rights and responsibilities regarding daily operations.

64 Resident Rights and Responsibilities These standard house rules/guidelines shall include but are not limited to requirements for:  Resident’s participation,  Safety and security procedures,  Use of drugs and alcohol,  Curfews, and  Statement of the shelter’s non-violence policy. Upon admission into the program, these rules shall be reviewed with all clients and a written copy must be provided. They must also be conspicuously posted.

65 Resident Rights and Responsibilities If an individual arrives at the shelter in a state of intoxication that may endanger the safety of that person or others, shelter staff will call Medical Rescue, and the Emergency Personnel will determine whether the individual is in need of medical attention. If program fees are charged, the fee will not be higher 30% of the resident’s income. This provision will not be construed to prevent savings plans at higher percentages if funds are returned to residents upon exit.

66 CASE MANAGEMENT

67 Case Management Shelters and residential programs will provide case management services to clients, or insure that clients have access to these services through another agency, while ensuring the following is accomplished: The shelter will develop and implement a set of written policies and procedures that clearly delineate the provision of case management services to include what specific services are to be provided, how they are to be provided, and by whom. Information about how to access all case management services will be posted conspicuously in each facility.

68 Case Management CHF Programs will post information designed to help residents access public assistance, job search, housing, health, mental health and substance abuse treatment, and food/soup kitchen resources. Programs will maintain confidential records to document services and referrals provided to each resident.

69 FOOD AND NUTRITION

70 Food and Nutrition Homeless service entities providing food services will comply with all applicable laws and regulations. Facilities will develop and implement guidelines for safe food storage, preparation, and clean up of all food preparation areas. Facilities should ensure that meals provide adequate nutrition, following the current USDA MyPlate & Food Pyramid (http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/dietary- guidance/myplatefood-pyramid-resources/usda-myplate- food-pyramid-resources).http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/dietary- guidance/myplatefood-pyramid-resources/usda-myplate- food-pyramid-resources

71

72 HEALTH AND SAFETY

73 Health and Safety The facility shall comply with applicable local/state zoning, building, electrical, plumbing, fire, environmental, health and safety codes. The facility shall utilize spaces in which furniture, appliances, heating/cooling units, walls, floors, roof, windows, lighting and plumbing are safe and fit for their intended purpose. The facility will be clean and in good repair. Facilities will provide an environment free from all pests. Shelters will provide a bed, mat or crib for each guest except in extenuating “overflow” conditions and based on size and/or type of shelter. The shelter will provide and maintain safe sleeping areas.

74 Health and Safety All beds, cots and cribs will meet current safety standards and be in good working condition. The shelter will provide and maintain clean and safe restroom facilities to include toilets, sinks and showers/bathtubs. The shelter will make provision for clean linens and towels for each client. Facilities and programs will refer all clients who are unable to be served to other agencies.

75 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

76 Emergency Preparedness The shelter will provide for safety and security including the development and maintenance of an emergency manual which outlines:  Emergency procedures for disaster and/or violence related evacuation;  Accountability for all persons in case of an emergency;  Emergency procedures for communicable diseases;  Procedures for individual emergencies including health or mental health emergencies;  Emergency contacts and phone numbers;  Location of utility shutoff sites such as water, electric and gas. Regular safety inspections and evacuation drills shall be conducted.

77 OPENING AND CLOSING TIMES

78 Opening and Closing Times Shelters not operating on a 24-hour basis will create and implement a policy for extension of their operating hours during inclement weather and during designated emergency situations including, but not limited to:  Severe weather,  Natural disasters, &  Other such situations as designated by governmental authorities. Shelter policies will allow residents who are employed to leave for and return from work without penalty.

79 BANNING CLIENTS

80 Banning Clients Definitions Suspension: A "suspension" is defined here as an action whereby a homeless service provider restricts shelter and/or services to a client for up to three (3) days. A referral to an alternative, equivalent service provider shall be made, if feasible; or a record of why the referral was not possible shall be kept. Ban: A "ban" is defined here as an action whereby a homeless service provider refuses shelter and/or services to a client for more than three (3) days.

81 Banning Clients A service provider has the right and responsibility to protect the safety of their staff and clients and may resolve a hazardous situation as they see fit. In extreme cases, such as physical violence or the use of a weapon, etc., it is clearly understood that any of the agency's authorized staff may choose to suspend a client for cause. During that time, a ban may or may not be considered. Disciplinary action shall be proportional to the infraction. A ban shall be used in only the most intractable of circumstances because of the devastating effect loss of services has on a client. Each agency shall designate those staff authorized to ban a client, preferably those with social service and conflict management skills. The agency shall have a goal of objectivity in the process and utilize bans only as a last resort.

82 Banning Clients If a ban is to be imposed, the agencies shall make every attempt to communicate the following to the client in writing.  The reason for the ban;  The duration of the ban;  Any conditions or stipulations imposed;  A referral to an alternative service provider, if feasible;  (The agency shall make every attempt to find the client an available alternative agency that provides equivalent services, or keep a record of why the referral was not possible.)  A description of the agency’s appeals process; and  A copy of the Grievance Procedures (“Program Assurances,” Section H).

83 Banning Clients Records: For each banning incident, confidential standardized records shall be kept. Time Limit: Any person who is banned for more than a six month period may file an appeal with the agency six months from the date of his or her discharge and again every six months after that. The above Suspension and Banning Standards are distinguished from an agency's right and responsibility to discharge clients due to completion of program and/or non-compliance with program requirements.

84 GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

85 Grievance Procedures A grievance is a formal complaint or allegation against a provider agency which is covered by the Office of Homelessness' Shelter Assurances and/or any staff members and/or volunteer associated with such a provider agency. The External Review Committee (ERC) will accept and review grievances from consumers regarding CHF programs. Depending on the outcome, recommendations for corrective actions may be transmitted to providers and their funding agency(ies).

86 Grievance Procedures The membership of the External Review Committee shall be equally weighted: # Categories 2 Rep of persons experiencing homelessness/formerly homeless 2Representatives of homeless providers/agencies 1Representative of a State agency* (with alternate) *The State agency representative will serve as Chair of the committee.

87 Grievance Procedures Step #1: Any person wishing to file a grievance must complete the standardized Grievance Form and submit such to the External Review Committee c/o Darlene Price, Housing Resources Commission, One Capitol Hill - 3rd Floor, Providence, R.I Individual needing assistance in completing this form and throughout the process may consult homeless advocacy organization (Point of contact: RI Coalition for the Homeless). Step #2: Grievances will be forwarded to the provider agency for response. Grievances will also immediately be forwarded to ERC members for consideration. Written agency responses will be required within two weeks. An agency's response may include actions the agency has taken to correct the issue. An agency's response, or lack of response within two weeks, will be provided to the ERC members.

88 Grievance Procedures No member of the ERC may participate in the process if an actual or perceived conflict exists. No meeting can be held without at least one representative in each of the above categories. On issues requiring a vote, each category will be given one vote. Decisions will be made by simple majority.

89 Grievance Procedures Step #1: Any person wishing to file a grievance must complete the standardized Grievance Form and submit such to the External Review Committee c/o Darlene Price, Housing Resources Commission, One Capitol Hill - 3rd Floor, Providence, R.I Individual needing assistance in completing this form and throughout the process may consult homeless advocacy organization (Point of contact: RI Coalition for the Homeless).

90 Questions


Download ppt "CHF Policies and Procedures Webinar January 2013."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google