Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

GLOBALIZATION, RESOURCES AND “NEW WARS” Money, Power and People.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "GLOBALIZATION, RESOURCES AND “NEW WARS” Money, Power and People."— Presentation transcript:

1 GLOBALIZATION, RESOURCES AND “NEW WARS” Money, Power and People

2 Main Themes

3 Greed VS. Grievance Paul Collier & Anke Hoeffler World Bank Paper Greed = When combatants are motivated to better their situations by joining the rebellion. Grievance = When combatants are motivated to join a rebellion due to ethnic and cultural difference rather economic strife. As demonstrated by the war in Sierra Leone, no conflict is created by just one or the other. Often, both come into play.

4 New Wars Warfare associated with globalization and the disintegration of states. Traits of New Wars:  Inclusion of external actors  Targeting civilians for purposes of terror  Exacerbates the disintegration of the state

5 Structural Violence The vicious cycle of suffering. What about other axes of suffering?  Axes of gender  Axes of age Any other axes you can think of in relation to the Sierra Leone war?

6 Conflict in Nigeria

7 Nigeria The World Bank categorizes Nigeria as a "fragile state," beset by risk of armed conflict, epidemic disease, and failed governance.

8 Political liberalization ushered in by the return to civilian rule in 1999 has allowed militants from religious and ethnic groups to express their frustrations more freely, and with increasing violence.

9 Tensions Fundamentalist Muslims clashing with Christians Inter-ethnic clashes- eg. Itsekiris and Ijaws Tensions between indigenous people and new settlers Failure of the state to provide basic services and employment for people

10 THE FORMER BRITISH COLONY IS ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST OIL PRODUCERS, BUT THE INDUSTRY HAS PRODUCED UNWANTED SIDE EFFECTS.

11 Tensions Few Nigerians, including those in oil-producing areas, have benefited from the oil wealth Corruption Pollution State military vs. insurgents- and the effects on civilians

12 Greed vs. Grievance Illegal “bunkering”- stealing oil and selling it to the black market Surge in militancy led by youth groups demanding access to the oil wealth in their territories Rival ethnic groups fighting for improved political position and access to oil resources Militarization of politics

13 MEND Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (2005) Group Kidnappings, strategic bombing, and attacks against oil production within Niger Delta Acts as an umbrella organization: linking together smaller groups by providing weapons, organization, and sophisticated tactics “Leave our land while you can or die in it…our aim is to totally destroy the capacity of the Nigerian government to export oil.”

14 Agenda MEND stresses that they do not aim for Nigerian civilians Government and oil industry targets: refinery, military barracks, state govt. house, and parking lots of oil companies (2006) Encourages kidnappings by smaller groups to create ungovernable region Threat to shut down entire oil production “We are not communists or even revolutionaries…we’re just extremely bitter men.”

15 Other Movements Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP)  Organized mass protests with the aim to shut down oil production  Demand $10 billion in royalties and enviromental- damage compensation Operation Climate Change  Ijaw groups delcare Ijaw territory off limits to national government and oil extraction

16 The Resource Curse Parallels the situation with Sierra Leone Even though both countries are extremely rich in resources, the general population has seen none of the positive effects Greed on the part of the oil companies, chiefs, and governments vs. grievances of the rebel groups and citizens RUF and MEND have similar views regarding their grievances  People within each country agree with their sentiments

17 Nigeria as a New War Intrastate conflict and non state actors  MEND, FNDIC, NDPVF, NDV, and many other militant groups, the role of Multinational Corporations, and the Nigerian Government as a player rather than a protector Guerrilla and terror tactics used MEND insurgents are not uniformed soldiers Funding of war comes from many sources

18 Kaplan vs. Keen Kaplan argues that many African conflicts are doomed to anarchy Keen argues that it is the limited lens of the people examining the conflict that leads to this assumption In Nigeria, there are countless actors involved in the conflict, so it can appear to be simply chaos

19 THE HISTORY OF THE CONGOLESE CONFLICT, ITS RESOURCES AND INTERNATIONAL INTEREST Congo: Who’s In Power

20 Overview (Race and History)

21 Congolese War (Time)

22 ( ( ( Time Fear Tactics (Time)

23 The Displaced (Crimes of Wars Project)

24 External Actors Congolese citizens that were quoted in a BBC article on the thoughts about the fighting and the involvement of Rwanda in the war, “…most people hate Rwanda. They say Rwanda- and more particularly President Kagame- has exploited and dominated the DRC like many other countries (BBC).”

25 Conflict Minerals: DR Congo images.php

26

27 images/Guardian/About/General/2008/11/7/ /Gallery-Congo- conflict-Un-002.jpg

28 Minerals Tin Tantalum (Coltan) Tungsten Gold nt/

29 Used in the production of increase-your-productivity-on-the-move/ bold-review/ 9.html

30 From Congo to consumers Photo credit: AP Photo/Andre Penner

31 ml

32 conflict-mineral-industry/

33

34

35

36

37

38

39 People: War Against Civilians in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) This map, published by Human Rights Watch (HRW, copyright 2009), zooms in on North and South Kivu, two provinces in Eastern DRC that have been, and are still currently being subjected to brutal conflict. Government and rebel forces regularly clash in these provinces, and all groups involved have committed atrocities against the civilian populations.

40 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) In September 2010, HRW published a report entitled, “Always on the Run” detailing displacement in the DRC. Its findings include: as of April 2010, approximately 1.8 million people have been displaced from the eastern provinces of the DRC. As of May 25, 2010, the UN estimates that 86% of IDPs live with host families. The remaining 14% move to “spontaneous sights.” IDPs are vulnerable to violence. In some of the more recent waves of violence, FDLR members attacked IDPs and villagers as punishment for “betrayal” to the FARDC and its allies. All groups have been known to attack IDPs as they flee. Some IDPs have been able to return home. On Aug. 12, 2010, the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) reported that since April 2009, 900,000 IDPs in North Kivu have been able to return to areas near their homes, allowing the UNHCR to shut down 6 of its 7 camps in the province. Many IDPs suffer from lack of basic necessities such as food, water and medical care. The situation is complicated by the fact that criminal gangs attack humanitarian aid workers, preventing them from reaching people in need (United Nations, 3/8/10).

41 IDP camps Right: This photo of a makeshift refugee camp in the DRC was published in the Telegraph on Nov. 4, 2008 (credited to Getty Images). Left: A refugee camp outside Goma in North Kivu. Photograph from BBC, November 1, 2008.

42 Child Soldiers Efforts are being made to combat the use of child soldiers by the FARDC and all of the rebel groups. According to a UN report from March 8, 2010, about 2,000 child soldiers have been demobilized since November 2008 in North and South Kivu. The same report also states that hundreds of child soldiers are still active in the ranks of the FARDC and other groups. This picture was featured in a news story by HRW. “Child soldiers practice with machine guns in a militia camp near Bunia in the Democratic Republic of Congo.” © 2003 Reuters

43 Violence against Women Violence against women has been used as a weapon of war by all armed parties involved in the conflict. Women are often gang raped and taken as sex slaves. (UN, 3/8/2010). Anderson Cooper, a reporter for CNN, has traveled to the Eastern DRC. He wrote in his blog that, “Most of the rapes are gang rapes, and they are extraordinarily brutal. Many women have had objects inserted into their vaginas -- broken bottles, bayonets, some women have even been shot between the legs.” (1/14/2008) Young women and their babies in the DRC. This photo was taken from a blog post by CNN’s Anderson Cooper on January 14, 2008

44 Sexual Violence and the FARDC In July 2009, HRW published a report entitled “Soldiers Who Rape, Commanders Who Condon,” detailing the sexual violence perpetrated by the Congolese Army, the FARDC. “FARDC soldiers have committed gang rapes, rapes leading to injury and death, and abductions of girls and women…commanders have frequently failed to stop sexual violence…the sheer size of the Congolese army and its deployment throughout the country make it the single largest group of perpetrators.” FARDC soldiers “during a ceremony marking the formation of the Congolese Armed Forces (FARDC) Light Infantry Battalion's establishment, February 17, 2010.” This battalion will be trained by the US Army. Photo: Nicole Dalrymple, US Africa Command

45 Structural Violence “In an increasingly militarized society, impunity, absence of the rule of law and women’s subordinate social and legal position reinforces a climate of general acceptance and tolerance for violence against women and girls. (UN, 3/8/2010) This description makes it clear that violence against women has become structural violence as much as a weapon of war. In 2006, Melanie Blanding filmed a documentary called “Women in War Zones” at Panzi Hospital in Bukavu, South Kivu, DRC. Panzi Hospital specializes in treating victims of sexual violence. Madeleine, pictured above, was a patient at the hospital. © Melanie Blanding, 2006

46 THE CIVIL WAR IN COLOMBIA Death by Coca

47 Colombia as a Model Example Statistics  According to analysis by the Colombian government, there exist about 80,000 hectares (over 300 square miles) of coca farms in Colombia  In areas where paramilitary groups and FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) operate, 42% and 58% of the crops cultivated is coca  Colombia exports approximately $13 billion a year in cocaine  An average of 430 tons of cocaine/year are exported to Mexican cartels

48 History of Modern Conflict in Colombia Left-wing revolutionary groups formed in the mid 1900s such as FARC Peace accords and rise of right-wing paramilitary groups Increased use of narcotics for revenue on both sides Decline of right-wing paramilitaries and resurgence of FARC through present day

49 Major Narco-trafficking routes and crop areas (CIA, 2000)

50 The Key Players FARC – The Guerillas Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia Claim to fight for the poor against the government and the elite Kidnappings and illegal drug trade Drug Traffickers and the Cartels Medellin Cartel: headed by Ochoa brothers and Pablo Escobar Cali Cartel: run by the Rodriguez Orejuela brothers and Santacruzo Londono The US “War on Drugs” Maximum demand for Colombian cocaine Military aid Paramilitary organizations Consists of 37 armed groups which make up the AUC (United Self- Defense Forces of Colombia) Formed between Responsible for most of the human rights violations and crimes

51 Connection to Sierra Leone “New war” Rebel groups Importance of natural resource Young participants Large number of civilian casualties Greed vs. grievance Foreign interest (continuation & prevention)

52 Conclusion MoneyPowerPeople

53 Discussion Questions Can you see how this cycle plays into the 4 conflicts discussed thus far? If not, where do you see the disconnection? Why hasn’t the conflict in the DRC based on what we’ve presented been as highly publicized as other conflicts and received as much international attention as it should of? Do you think that the conflict in Nigeria reflects a coming anarchy motivated by greed or targeted violence motivated by grievances? What course of action can bring about peace in Columbia?

54 Sources (Congo) "Democratic Republic of Congo." Country Profile. BBC, Web. 24 Sept "Democratic Republic of Congo." Crimes of War. N.p., Web. 24 Sept Hockstein, Evelyn. Death in the Congo Time: n. pag. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Sept "The Democratic Republic of Congo." Race and History. N.p., Web. 24 Sept "Why Congo." Raise Hope for Congo. Center for American Progress, Web. 24 Sept

55 Sources (Congo) The Drucker Institute: Claremont Graduate University  Improvisational economics: Coltan production in the eastern Congo by Jeffrey W. Mantz (July 10, 2008)  LA Times Editorial: Congo's conflict minerals (July 26, 2010)  Enough Project: Stories form the Mouth of the Mine  Conflict Minerals 101: Coltan, the Congo Act, and How you Can Help by Rachel Cernansky (April 19, 2010 )  Time: The Deadliest War In the World by Simon Robinson (May 28, 2006)  BBC: Q&A: DR Congo Conflict (August 27, 2010)  H.R Conflict Minerals Trade Act  Enough Project: Eastern Congo 

56 Bibliography - Text Cooper, A. (2008, January 14, 2008). Anderson's view: War against women. Message posted to view-war-against-women.htmlHassan, Y. (2010). DRC: Thousands return home. United Nations: United Nations High Commission for Refugees.Simpson, G. (2010). Always on the run: The vicious cycle of displacement in eastern congo. United States of America: Human Rights Watch. Retrieved from Nations Experts. (2010). Technical assistance and capacity building. United Nations: United Nations Human Rights Council. Retrieved from ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G10/118/53/PDF/G pdf view-war-against-women.htmlHassan, Y. (2010). DRC: Thousands return home. United Nations: United Nations High Commission for Refugees.Simpson, G. (2010). Always on the run: The vicious cycle of displacement in eastern congo. United States of America: Human Rights Watch. Retrieved from Nations Experts. (2010). Technical assistance and capacity building. United Nations: United Nations Human Rights Council. Retrieved from ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G10/118/53/PDF/G pdf Hassan, Y. (2010). DRC: Thousands return home. United Nations: United Nations High Commission for Refugees. Simpson, G. (2010). Always on the run: The vicious cycle of displacement in eastern congo. United States of America: Human Rights Watch. Retrieved from United Nations Experts. (2010). Technical assistance and capacity building. United Nations: United Nations Human Rights Council. Retrieved from ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G10/118/53/PDF/G pdf?http://daccess-dds- ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G10/118/53/PDF/G pdf?

57 Bibliography - Pictures Pictures: Map – ©Human Rights Watch, 2009 A refugee camp outside Goma in North Kivu. Photograph from BBC, November 1, 2008 Makeshift refugee camp in the DRC was published in the Telegraph on Nov. 4, 2008 (credited to Getty Images) “Child soldiers practice with machine guns in a militia camp near Bunia in the Democratic Republic of Congo.” Published in Human Rights Watch, © 2003 Reuters Young women and their babies in the DRC. This photo was taken from a blog post by CNN’s Anderson Cooper on January 14, 2008 FARDC Soldiers in Ceremony - Nicole Dalrymple, US Africa Command, Feb. 17, 2010 Madeleine at Panzi Hospital – ©Melanie Blanding, 2006

58 Sources (Columbia) PBS timeline of Colombian conflict - Information on cocaine exports news/news/5972-cocaine-colombias-number-one-illicit-export-continues-to- boom.htmlhttp://colombiareports.com/colombia- news/news/5972-cocaine-colombias-number-one-illicit-export-continues-to- boom.html NY Times article on Colombia and cocaine - NPR Story on peasants in Rural Colombia - Article on Colombian DMZ - lombian-rebels-plan-for-cocaine-war.html lombian-rebels-plan-for-cocaine-war.html History of FARC -


Download ppt "GLOBALIZATION, RESOURCES AND “NEW WARS” Money, Power and People."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google