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© Crown copyright 2009 CLLD Consultants’ CPD Events March 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "© Crown copyright 2009 CLLD Consultants’ CPD Events March 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Crown copyright 2009 CLLD Consultants’ CPD Events March 2010

2 © Crown copyright Aims The purposes of the day are (i) to continue to explore ways of disseminating effective practice that leads to observable change and (ii) for the national team of funded CLLD consultants to have a shared understanding of future developments in the early literacy agenda as we prepare for the changing world after March 2011.

3 © Crown copyright Agenda Welcome and introduction Session 1: The transition to the Revised Primary Curriculum and ‘fit for purpose’ pedagogies Break Session 2: Schools’ capacity to secure all children’s entitlement; challenging progress Session 3: Introduction to The Gateway to Writing Lunch Session 4: LA presentation and discussion Plenary and evaluations

4 © Crown copyright DCSF analysis January 2010 Relationships between EYFSP and Key Stage Results

5 © Crown copyright Relationship between EYFSP CLL scale points and KS1 Reading performance Source: SARD, 2009

6 © Crown copyright … and KS1 writing performance… Source: SARD, 2009

7 © Crown copyright … and KS1 maths performance Source: SARD, 2009

8 © Crown copyright There is a relationship between PSRN and KS1 Maths performance… Source: SARD, 2009

9 © Crown copyright …yet it is the CLL scales that are most highly correlated with KS1 outcomes Source: SARD, 2009

10 © Crown copyright Session 1 The transition to the Revised Primary Curriculum and ‘fit for purpose’ pedagogies

11 © Crown copyright Primary Curriculum Review The early phase of curricular progressions in the (draft) programmes of learning show how the primary curriculum dovetails with the EYFS…This should enable schools to plan a curriculum in Year 1 that is more aligned to the six areas of learning and development in the EYFS…To achieve this however Year 1 teachers will require a sound understanding of the EYFS’ Para 4.3

12 © Crown copyright Highly structured Adult- directed, little or no play Unstructured Play without adult support Contexts for learning: Play and Playfulness Direct instruction Providing assistance Guided interaction Participating in play Providing direct and instructive teaching Orchestrating interactive teaching Reviewing learning, intervening and supporting learning Structuring and steering independent learning Focused learning Adult-guided, playful experiential activities Child- initiated play Adult support for enabling environment, and sensitive interaction

13 © Crown copyright Unstructured Play without adult support Focused learning Adult-guided, playful experiential activities Child- initiated play Adult support for enabling environment, and sensitive interaction Highly structured Adult-directed, little or no play One-to- one Independent Whole classGuided group

14 © Crown copyright …’It follows that local providers and schools should establish policies designed to sustain children’s progress across (these) transition points.’ Para 4.1 of the Primary Curriculum Review ‘(APP).. emphasises the continuity of assessment practice with that of the Early Years Foundation Stage profile.’ Para 4.11 of the Primary Curriculum Review

15 © Crown copyright Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum Pedagogy “ Taken together these factors should offer considerable flexibility … to strengthen learning through play and strongly support children’s progress and well-being over the three highly formative years linking pre-school provision with the Reception year and into Year1..” (4.17) Curriculum “..enable schools to plan a curriculum in Year 1 that is more aligned to the six areas of learning and development in the EYFS, whilst ensuring appropriate attention continues to be paid to developing speaking and listening, early reading, writing and number work.”(4.44) Assessment “To achieve this, however, Year 1 teachers will require a sound understanding of the EYFS in order to make the most effective links to the National Curriculum and to enable them to support children who are still working towards the Early Learning Goals.” (4.45)

16 © Crown copyright In particular the primary curriculum should: … provide continued entitlement from early years to a coherent, broad and balanced curriculum’ Page 5 ‘The new curriculum …recognises the importance of play based and active learning in engaging children and helping them achieve a wide range of outcomes and make the best possible progress.’ Page 7

17 © Crown copyright Session 2 In Pursuit of Progress: securing schools’ capacity

18 © Crown copyright Progression: two key aspects Progression in learning “Inspections reports of outstanding primary schools provide evidence of the importance of systematic teaching of phonics in promoting rapid progress in early reading.” HMCI Annual Report Progression in school improvement “A strong focus on ensuring consistency in teaching, and reducing variation in quality, is essential to further progress.” HMCI Annual Report

19 © Crown copyright Phonic progress Assessment of progress through the phonic phases is a means to an end – not an end in itself. Over-dwelling on the nature of ‘secure’ can become a barrier to progress. The focus of discussion in schools must now move on…

20 © Crown copyright The slow start to Phase 2 While there are some issues around staggered or part-time starts, the principal reason for delay in starting phase 2 is simply that it is not begun at the appropriate time. Discussion: In groups identify three strategies for ensuring a prompt start. What do you say when you are told the children are “not ready” to begin Phase 2?

21 © Crown copyright Phase 4: Avoiding the ‘scenic route’ Phase 4 is short (4 week maximum) because it is no more than a consolidation of children’s prior knowledge in the context of words containing adjacent consonants and polysyllabic words. Some consultants and teachers have found that from Phase 3 children can move directly into a blend of Phase 4 and Phase 5. Discussion: In groups agree two strategies for ensuring that Phase 4 is covered rapidly.

22 © Crown copyright From YR to Y1: Too many children experience a set-back when they move from YR to Y1. This is because some Y1 teachers do not start from where the children were at the end of the summer term. Discussion: In groups agree three things which you believe constitute best practice for a consultant in ensuring that the Y1 set-back does not happen.

23 © Crown copyright The 2nd aspect of progression: CLLD as school improvement In the target schools: Relentless focus on the creation of strong leadership at school level The leadership team must be provided with clear and realistic feedback Termly review meetings involving the HT are crucial The school must engage energetically with the challenge of maintaining momentum and working for sustainability The SIP must comment evaluatively on the effectiveness of the school’s response to and use of CLLD support

24 © Crown copyright The 2nd aspect of progression: CLLD as school improvement “Nowhere is an entitlement to ‘quality first teaching’ more necessary or important than in equipping every child with a command of reading and writing skills.” Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum, Final Report Good consultancy develops in the school a coherent understanding of how the different elements of the CLLD Programme are all essential and work interdependently to build quality first teaching.

25 © Crown copyright The 2nd aspect of progression: CLLD as school improvement In the universal offer get messages straight, to help all schools understand that CLLD is a tried and tested good practice approach developed by the Strategies as the default model. Discussion: In your groups agree five key messages that all schools need to grasp if they are to understand how CLLD can support and strengthen the development of early literacy.

26 © Crown copyright Session 3 The Gateway to Writing

27 © Crown copyright Primary Curriculum Review: Recommendation 11 The two early learning goals for writing should be retained as valid, aspirational goals for the end of the EYFS The DCSF should consider producing additional guidance for practitioners on supporting children’s early writing and should offer practical examples of how this can work

28 © Crown copyright Overview Web based resource bank Existing and new writing guidance Specific needs of boys Examples of effective practice Writing samples Four interdependent strands of language development Crucial role of practitioners

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33 © Crown copyright Getting started First things first: Identify your priorities Flowcharts Frequently Asked Questions

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37 © Crown copyright New documents Two main documents: The crucial role of the Early Years practitioner in supporting young writers within a literacy rich environment Boys and writing

38 © Crown copyright Audits First things first: Identify your priorities Writing provision for boys audit Literate role play provision for boys audit: blank and completed

39 © Crown copyright Smaller documents Learning about sentences Developing handwriting Meeting the needs of gifted and talented boys FAQs Flowcharts

40 © Crown copyright Session 4 LA Presentation and discussion

41 © Crown copyright Plenary and evaluations

42 © Crown copyright 2009 Crown copyright The content of this publication may be reproduced for non-commercial research, education or training purposes provided that the material is acknowledged as Crown copyright, the publication title is specified, it is reproduced accurately and not used in a misleading context. For any other use of this material please apply to OPSI for a Click-Use, PSI Licence, or by writing to: Office of Public Sector Information Information Policy Team National Archives Kew Richmond Surrey TW9 4DU Web: The permission to reproduce Crown copyright protected material does not extend to any material in this publication which is identified as being the copyright of a third party, or to Royal Arms and other departmental or agency logos, nor does it include the right to copy any photographic or moving images of children or adults in a way that removes the image or footage from its original context. © Crown copyright


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