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Teaching Literacy in an ESL Context. Which of these children will do well in reading?

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Presentation on theme: "Teaching Literacy in an ESL Context. Which of these children will do well in reading?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Teaching Literacy in an ESL Context

2 Which of these children will do well in reading?

3 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 What is reading? z q r d s f d e o m s l p S B R 5 Q N L 3 1 F P R 4. T R A N S L A T I O N 5. P R A F A N I Z I N G L Y 6. C a n y o u r e a d t h is?

4 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 How do we read texts? A man was building a boat in his basement. When he had finished the boot he discovered it was too big to get through the door. So he had to take the boat a part to get it out. He should of planned ahead.

5 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 Three cueing system Grapho-phonic (knowledge of letters, sounds or characters) Syntactic (knowing Grammar) Semantic (background knowledge)

6 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 Three cueing system Graphophonic Cues I like reading I have many b_____s at home Semantic cues I like reading. I have many _______ at my house. Syntactic cues I like reading. I have many _______ in my house (books, book, read) We know the missing word is a noun

7 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 Which cueing system is relied on by ESL readers? 4.3 p14

8 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 A competent English speaking reader “samples” the print, picking out the key words which carry the most meaning Where might the process break down for ESL students? First language learnerSecond language learner A second language learner may not be familiar with the grapho-phonic symbols and/ or not recognise which are the key words carrying the most information Adapted from Pauline Gibbons Learning to Learn in a Second Language (1991)

9 Teaching Reading - Phonics? Make a word s, o, g, p, e, n

10 Teaching Reading - Phonics? SPONGE But which one? It also good to remember that many ESL students do not have the same sounds in their language that we have in English and so may have difficulty with hearing them

11 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 A competent English speaking reader predicts what is about to be read on the basis of semantic and syntactic information Where might the process break down for ESL students? First language learnerSecond language learner A second language learner may not have sufficient background knowledge, cultural knowledge or language knowledge to predict and instead rely more heavily on grapho- phonic cues. Adapted from Pauline Gibbons Learning to Learn in a Second Language (1991)

12 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 A competent English speaking reader tests each prediction. They read for meaning. Where might the process break down for ESL students? First language learnerSecond language learner A second language learner may not be able to tell whether a prediction sounds like English or makes sense. Adapted from Pauline Gibbons Learning to Learn in a Second Language (1991)

13 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 A competent English speaking reader confirms or rejects each prediction. Where might the process break down for ESL students? First language learnerSecond language learner A second language learner may not be able to confirm or do incorrectly. Adapted from Pauline Gibbons Learning to Learn in a Second Language (1991)

14 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 A competent English speaking reader will correct when necessary. Where might the process break down for ESL students? First language learnerSecond language learner A second language learner may not recognise a miscue or may not know how to correct it. Adapted from Pauline Gibbons Learning to Learn in a Second Language (1991)

15 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 Implications for teaching reading to ESL students An interactive approach: Teach students a range of reading strategies Teach students to use strategies flexibly To become fluent readers, students need to have both good prediction skills and cueing systems but also good decoding skills. Reading develops naturally as does speaking. Second language readers need to read a wide variety of texts frequently.

16 T eaching E nglish L anguage L earners across the curriculum | NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009 Building schema What knowledge or prediction do ESL readers need to read in a particular KLA? the content of the reading - background knowledge about the overall meaning hidden meanings such as humour or irony cultural background text type: e.g stories, reports etc word meanings grammatical structures sounds, characters and letters

17 Teaching Reading Learning through reading Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan 2011 Saturday, March 12, 2011 by Cindy Kirana Can you write 3 questions that might be answered by this report? Discuss briefly what you know about tsunamis with your group You are now going to read a new report about the tsunami in Japan

18 How can you support SLA? Developing vocabulary Sleep: slumber, doze, snooze, nap, forty winks, siesta, lie down, crash, kip Walk: saunter, stroll, amble, toddle, dawdle, march, stride, pace, hike, go, move Eat: gobble, scoff, wolf, devour, bolt, munch, chomp, gorge, swallow, gulp Say: speak, utter, whisper, declare, pronounce, state, cry, exclaim, reply, answer, shout, mumble Laugh: chuckle, giggle, snort, hoot, guffaw, cackle, chortle, fall about, have hysterics,

19 How can you support SLA? Be aware of comprehension limitations The Krinklejup A krinklejup was parling a tristlebin. A barjam stipped. The barjam grupped “minto” to the krinklejup. The krinklejup zisked zoelly. 1. What was the krinklejup doing? 2. What stipped? 3. What did the barjam grup? 4. How did the krinklejup zisk? 5. What do you think is grupping? 6. What do you think parling could be? 7. What is a krinklejup? 8. What is a barjam?

20 Teaching Reading What is a tsunami? Tsunami is a Japanese word with the English translation: "harbour wave". A tsunami is a series of ocean waves with very long wavelengths (typically hundreds of kilometres) caused bywavelengths large-scale disturbances of the ocean, such as: 1. earthquakes 2. landslides 3. volcanic eruptions 4. explosions 5. meteorites These disturbances can either be from below (e.g. underwater earthquakes with large vertical displacements, submarine landslides) or from above (e.g. meteorite impacts).

21 Some quotes Pedantry consists in the use of words unsuitable to the time, place, and company. - Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Biographia LiterariaSamuel Taylor Coleridge The chief virtue that language can have is clearness, and nothing detracts from it so much as the use of unfamiliar words. - Hippocrates of Iphicrates Hippocrates of Iphicrates Mechanical difficulties with language are the outcome of internal difficulties with thought. - Elizabeth BowenElizabeth Bowen


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