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Literacy evening for Reception and Key Stage 1 Tuesday 19 th November 2013 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Literacy evening for Reception and Key Stage 1 Tuesday 19 th November 2013 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Literacy evening for Reception and Key Stage 1 Tuesday 19 th November

2 Aims of the evening How we teach reading Book banding School library developments How we teach writing 2

3 What does Reception and Key Stage 1 mean? Reception - Early years foundation stage Key Stage 1 - Years 1 and 2 3

4 Reading 4

5 Why read? For pleasure To find things out 5

6 10 benefits of reading 1.Children who read often and widely, get better at it 2.Reading exercises our brain 3.Reading improves concentration – sit still, quietly focus 4.Reading teaches children about the world around them – people, places, events outside their own experience 6

7 10 benefits of reading 5. Reading improves children’s vocabulary, leads to more highly-developed language skills and develops children’s ability to write well 6.Reading develops children’s imaginations – descriptions into pictures; imagine how the characters feel 7

8 10 benefits of reading 7. Reading helps children develop empathy 8. Children who read do better at school 9. Reading is a great form of entertainment 10. Reading relaxes the body and calms the mind – how to relax and be silent 8

9 The importance of reading 9

10 10

11 The importance of reading 11

12 How we teach reading Phonics Guided reading 12

13 Phonics 13

14 What is phonics? Letters and sounds 26 letters in the alphabet Combinations of letters make 44 sounds Short vowel sounds: a, e, i, o, u Long vowel sounds: combinations of more than one vowel = digraphs: ai, ee, igh, oa, ue 14

15 What is phonics? What sounds letters make Eg, s says ssss; oa in coat says o How to represent sounds with letters/combinations of letters Eg, to write the long o sound in coat you need oa To write the long e sound in feet you need ee 15

16 What is phonics? Segmenting words into sounds Blending sounds to say/read words 16

17 What is phonics? Phoneme = a unit of sound The word cat has 3 phonemes: c-a-t Train has 4 phonemes: t-r-ai-n 17

18 How do we teach phonics? From Reception to Year 2 In small groups Children grouped depending on where they are upto in their phonic knowledge There are 6 phases to teaching phonics 18

19 Phonics Phase 1: Nursery and Reception Environmental sounds: in their play, sounds animals make, sounds different objects make Instrumental sounds: shakers – how sounds can be changed, musical instruments, making up simple rhymes Body percussion: march, stamp, clap to the beat 19

20 Phonics Phase 1: Rhythm and rhyme: build up a stock of rhymes from hearing them repeated over and over again Where English is an additional language, songs and rhymes help children to tune into the rhythm and sound of English 20

21 Phonics Phase 1: Enjoying and sharing books Word play: inventing new rhymes Alliteration: please can I have some sizzling sausages/chunky chips 21

22 Phonics Phase 1: Book area: lots of books with alliterative rhymes and jingles Voice sounds: eg We’re going on a bear hunt: use sound effects: swish swish through the grass, squelch squelch in the mud Children vocalise sounds as they play: h, h, h, when hopping; b,b,b when bouncing a ball 22

23 Phonics Phase 1: Oral blending and segmenting Oral blending: It’s time to get your c-oa-t, coat. Touch your t-oe-s, toes. Toy talk: A toy that can speak in sound-talk: What would Gabby like for tea today? Ch-ee-se, cheese eg. Fish, cake, pie, soup 23

24 Phonics Phase 1: Oral blending and segmenting: Nursery and Reception Clapping sounds: Words using s,a,t,p,i,n letters: Eg. Sat, pin, nip, pat, tap, pit, pip, Which one? Lay out objects with names that contain three phonemes, eg. l-ea-f, sh-ee-p, s-oa-p Use the sound-talk toy 24

25 Phonics Phase 2: move to blending and segmenting with letters In Reception and for those who still need it, into years 1 and 2. 25

26 Phonics Phase 2: move to blending and segmenting with letters Out loud Action for each sound: S – weave hand in an s shape, like a snake and say ssss A – wiggle fingers above elbow as if ants crawling on you, saying a, a, a 26

27 Phonics Phase 2: move to blending and segmenting with letters Learning the sounds does not follow alphabetical order Introduced to at least 19 letters of the alphabet s, a, t, p, i, n Move on from oral blending and segmenting to blending and segmenting with letters 27

28 Phonics Phase 2: move to blending and segmenting with letters Oral segmenting : s-a-t Oral blending: sat Clapping the sounds/sound fingers 28

29 Phonics Phase 2: move to blending and segmenting with letters Use magnetic boards and letters Phoneme frames where they write the letters Sound buttons /sound fingers 29

30 Phonics Phase 2 a phoneme frame showing a word with three phonemes/sounds s a t 30

31 Phonics Phase 2 a phoneme frame showing a word with three phonemes/sounds c oa t 31

32 Phonics Phase 2: Need to apply their phonic knowledge in writing words and sentences 32

33 Phonics Phase 2: Daily teaching sequence: Revisit and review Teach Practise Apply 33

34 Phonics Phase 2: Initially in Reception the children will bring home books for you to share with them Once they know some sound/letter correspondences and sight words they will start to bring books home which follow simple phonic patterns 34

35 Phonics Phase 2: Importance of applying their phonic skills of segmenting and blending when beginning to read Need lots of books with phonic patterns in Need to read the books over and over again 35

36 Phonics Phase 2: Importance of sight words too: 32 of the first 100 high frequency words: eg. an, as, can, dad Include tricky words which have to be learnt on sight: eg. no, go, into 36

37 Phonics Phase 3: Learn the rest of the sounds so they know the 44 sounds Introduced to long vowel sounds: combinations of letters to make a sound: Eg. ai (rain), ee (feet), ie (tie), oa (boat), ue (blue) Next 24 of the first 100 high frequency words 37

38 Phonics Moving on in the phases Children will be moved on in the phonic phases when they are ready to, regardless of whether they are in Reception, Year 1 or Year 2 Children who are not secure on the sounds in phase 2 will not move onto those in phase 3 until they are ready to. 38

39 Phonics Moving on in the phases So your child may move into Year 1 or even Year 2 and still be on phase 2 or 3 If that is the case that is where they are upto in their phonics learning and they won’t master the next phase until they are secure on the previous one. 39

40 Phonics Moving on in the phases Some children take a lot longer than others to master phonics Those children who need to will go to Mrs Priest, our SENCO for additional literacy support, and they will have an IEP: an individual education plan 40

41 Phonics Phase 4: No new sounds introduced Adjacent consonants: went, frost Words may have 4 or 5 phonemes: F-l-a-g, ch-i-m-p S-p-e-n-d, g-r-a-s-p Polysyllabic words: chil-dren, sham-poo 20 more high frequency words to learn 41

42 Phonics Phase 5 Different ways to spell long vowel sounds: Eg. Long a sound instead of ai: spelt –ay as in day; a-e as in cake Alternative pronunciations: Eg i instead of as in t-i-n mind, find 24 more high frequency words to learn 42

43 Phonics Phase 5 There are lots to learn The most difficult phase to master If children are not secure on phase 3, where they were introduced to the first way to read and spell the long vowel digraphs: ai, ee, igh, oa, ue, then they can not pick up phase 5 43

44 Phonics Phase 5 They may have to revisit phase 3 to make sure they are secure first 44

45 Phonics Phase 6 By this stage children should be able to read hundreds of words by: Sight Decoding (segmenting) silently and quickly Decoding aloud 45

46 Phonics Phase 6 Children’s spelling should be phonetically accurate, although it may still be a little unconventional Spelling usually lags behind reading, as it is harder 46

47 Phonics Phonics screening test Year 1 Re-sit in Year 2 Need to be secure on phase 5 to do well on it 47

48 Phonics into Year 3 We would hope that the majority of children are secure at phase 5 by the time they move into Year 3 where they will continue to do phonics 48

49 Phonics What you can do to help at home Reinforce what your child is doing at school Practise the sounds/words that come home 5/10 minutes a night Little and often is more effective than one long session 49

50 Phonics What you can do to help at home 30 children in a class Secure on different sounds and words Those children who get to practise their sounds and words at home do better than those who don’t 50

51 Book banding Books are organised into colours according to National Curriculum levels These levels go from working towards Level 1 upto 4a, so continue into Key Stage 2 In Stanwix, we have a range of books from different publishers within each band, eg. Oxford reading tree, Ginn 51

52 Book banding Within each class, the books are arranged in baskets according to their book banding colour It’s not a case of rushing through the baskets and only reading a book once It’s about enjoying a book and understanding it, not just decoding the words on the page 52

53 Book banding Within each book band there are stories, poetry and information books Children need to be able to read all of these, not just the stories Some publishers’ books seem easier, eg. Oxford reading tree 53

54 Guided reading 54

55 What is guided reading? Where children share the same book in a small group of 6 children with a teacher/teaching assistant In this way, every child is heard reading at least once a week Children are in groups according to what they need to learn to do with their reading: decoding, comprehension 55

56 What is guided reading? Children get to practise their decoding (phonics) skills and recognising the sight words they have learned, as well as learning additional reading strategies like, going back and re-reading, missing out the word and reading on to the end of the sentence 56

57 What is guided reading? They are taught how to: Predict what might be going to happen Find answers to questions Read between the lines Discuss the setting, the plot, the characters Understand the author’s use of language 57

58 What is guided reading? They are taught how to: Learn to read unknown words Widen their vocabulary Read a poem/an information book Find their way around an information book Make connections between other books Say what they like/dislike 58

59 What do the rest of the class do during guided reading? They work in groups on independent reading activities Which follow on from what they read in their group in a previous session 59

60 When do we listen to your child read outside of guided reading? Impossible to do this while teaching Do it when on PPA Time That’s why guided reading is so important That’s why it is important to listen to your children read every night 60

61 How do we decide what level of book your child needs to be on? For every child there is an: Easy Instructional Hard level of reading book for them 61

62 How do we decide what level of book your child needs to be on? Also, being able to read every word on the page does not make them a good reader They have to read with fluency, at a good pace, with expression, pausing at the right places 62

63 How do we decide what level of book your child needs to be on? They have to: Have understood what they have read Be able to talk about their reading 63

64 Book banded reading books which come home These should be easy But we tend to send instructional books home because we expect you to listen to your child read Ideally, they should read an easy book and part of their instructional book each night 64

65 Our school library 65

66 Our school library Computerised borrowing system All classes can borrow from it, although not much suitable for Reception and Key Stage 1 to read on their own yet Can borrow books to share with someone at home 66

67 Re-fit of our school library Re-decoration New purpose-built shelving New carpet New furniture Inspirational words on the wall 67

68 Re-fit of our school library 68

69 Re-fit of our school library 69

70 Re-fit of our school library 70

71 Writing 71

72 Why is writing important? Your child will need to write for themselves and others throughout their lives 72

73 New Curriculum for 2014 The New Curriculum for 2014 talks about writing in terms of: Composition Transcription 73

74 Composition Involves: Planning, forming, articulating your ideas Organising your ideas coherently for the reader Being aware of your audience and the purpose for your writing 74

75 Composition Involves: How to structure your ideas Using standard English grammar properly Having a wide knowledge of vocabulary and making effective use of it Using punctuation correctly 75

76 Transcription Involves: Handwriting Spelling 76

77 How do we teach Composition? Linked to our topic work Build up to a piece of writing Scaffold the children all the way Show good examples of the type of writing Model how to write Shared writing Independent writing 77

78 How do we teach Composition? Build in improvement time Children are aware of learning objectives and success criteria It may take 2/3 weeks to teach a particular piece of writing 78

79 How do we teach composition? Teach: The structure of the piece of writing, eg a recount, a report, an explanation, a story VCOP 79

80 What is VCOP? V = vocabularyadjectives/adverbs C = connectivesand, but, so, because O = openers Then, Next, However P = punctuation capital letter, full stop ? !, “ ” 80

81 What is VCOP? Like phonics teaching, there is an order in how the different VCOP skills are taught 81

82 Importance of the perfect sentence Capital letter Full stop Finger spaces Makes sense 82

83 How do we teach transcription? Handwriting: Regular discrete lessons Modelling of handwriting Correct letter formation/orientation/size Difference between tall and small letters In-strokes joining 83

84 How do we teach transcription? Handwriting: Aiming for: Correct letter formation/orientation/size Difference between tall and small letters In-strokes joining 84

85 How do we teach transcription? Spelling: Linked to phonics lessons Linked to topic lessons High frequency words Tricky words 85

86 How do we teach transcription? Spelling: Methods: Look, say, cover, write, check Magic spelling 86

87 Thank you for coming 87


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