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Presentation slide 1.1a Aims of the module To introduce TAs to an overview of the literacy curriculum and to support new TAs in learning about: –the Early.

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Presentation on theme: "Presentation slide 1.1a Aims of the module To introduce TAs to an overview of the literacy curriculum and to support new TAs in learning about: –the Early."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentation slide 1.1a Aims of the module To introduce TAs to an overview of the literacy curriculum and to support new TAs in learning about: –the Early Years Foundation Stage –the English National Curriculum –the Primary framework –support for developing early reading –other published resources that support literacy

2 Presentation slide 1.1b Aims of the module (continued) To help TAs to understand the changes made with the introduction of the Early Years Foundation Stage and renewed Primary framework (literacy), in particular: –the 12 strands of learning and teaching –the prime importance of high-quality phonics work in the reception class –‘the simple view of reading’ –the importance of actively promoting children’s speaking and listening skills –the need for children to learn to read by year 2 –the development of early writing

3 Presentation slide 1.2 Literacy catch-up packages Early Literacy Support (ELS) for pupils in year 1 (revised version from January 2008) Year 3 literacy support – Sir Kit’s Quest Further Literacy Support (FLS) for pupils in year 5

4 Presentation slide 1.3 Literacy in the Primary National Strategy A focus on learning key objectives Carefully planned, purposeful and well directed teaching and learning remain at the core of the Primary Framework. Emphasis on the teaching of ‘the simple view of reading’ and daily discrete teaching of phonics for early reading Emphasis on sequences of teaching, focusing on learning outcomes A three-part lesson may still be suitable but teachers can now adapt and revise to aid pupils’ learning. Sustaining pupils’ interest and enjoyment are key Making links between subjects are central to this flexibility and support

5 Presentation slide 1.4 The Primary Framework has a clear structure It is organised into 12 strands of learning Speaking and listening strand 1. Speaking 2. Listening and responding 3. Group discussion and interaction 4. Drama

6 Presentation slide 1.5 Reading strands 5. Word recognition, decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling) 6. Word structure and spelling 7. Understanding and interpreting texts 8. Engaging with and responding to texts The Rose Review refers to ‘the simple view of reading’. Phonic teaching and learning will be central to learning. Rigorous phonic work begins in the reception class.

7 Presentation slide 1.6 Writing strands 9. Creating and shaping texts 10. Text structure and organisation 11. Sentence structure and punctuation 12. Presentation

8 Presentation slide 2.1 Supporting the reception teacher during whole-class teaching Drawing in reticent pupils or looking out for those who demonstrate higher ability Dropping helpful pointers, eg. “I can see something that starts with that sound” Supporting pupils by nodding, smiling encouragement, etc. Joining in and making contributions (when appropriate) Demonstrating for the teacher, eg. how to find a word displayed on the wall Raising questions or problems so the teacher or children can explain something Echoing the teacher by quietly repeating or rewording phrases for children who need extra help Acting as a partner for a less-able pupil during ‘talking time’, using shared first languages where appropriate Using supportive props (eg. pictures, objects and flash cards) Observing children’s responses to the teacher and noting them down to contribute to assessment information.

9 Presentation slide 2.2 Behaviour management Sitting alongside a child with challenging behaviour Focusing a child’s attention Making eye contact Supporting children who need specific help to participate in and gain from the lesson Dealing with incidents or behaviour that affects the pace of the lesson or disrupts the learning of others

10 Presentation slide 2.3 Resource management Preparing, distributing and collecting resources Helping children use resources Supporting the effective use of teaching ‘props’

11 Presentation slide 2.4 An extra pair of eyes Observing individual children – and noting their response or reticence Noting who ‘can’ and who ‘can’t’ and checking any assessment information about the children Assessing progress to feed back to the teacher. TAs should familiarise themselves with the school’s assessment procedures, especially in relation to the Early Years Foundation Stage profile.

12 Presentation slide 2.5 Assisting during group and independent work Small group phonics activity Guided reading and guided writing Supporting group discussion Introducing and reinforcing specific vocabulary Phonics games and using Letters and Sounds materials or those resources which the school has purchased Helping children with activities, eg. supporting role-play or retelling a story with puppets Assessing progress to feed back to the teacher and recording this in a way that best fits the school’s assessment systems

13 Presentation slide 2.6 What’s special about reception? (1) Type of activities – often with a particular focus on speaking and listening during play activities Use of TA time in communication, language and literacy sessions – either leading an activity with a group of children or intervening during child-chosen activities for a particular purpose, eg. extending vocabulary, encouraging conversation Indoor and outdoor learning – facilities to promote all areas of learning are often provided both outside and inside.

14 Presentation slide 2.7 What’s special about reception? (2) Some possible answers: More learning through play, talk and role-play Emphasis on development of speaking and listening skills Multisensory activities to capture their interest and sustain motivation Some group and independent activities are child-initiated, rather than adult- led Some communication, language and literacy activities take place outside Communication, language and literacy may be taught throughout the day as well as in specific sessions Many key communication, language and literacy objectives are taught throughout the day through singing, storytelling, role-play and so on Communication, language and literacy skills are observed and assessed during child-initiated play, as well as during adult-led activities.

15 Presentation slide 2.8 Developing communication, language and literacy Sessions may include elements of: –whole-class shared reading and writing –whole-class discrete phonic work –adult-led group and independent work – reading and writing –adult intervention to promote communication, language and literacy in freely chosen activities –review of learning with children All work underpinned by opportunities for speaking and listening Communication, language and literacy can be taught in all areas of learning All progress should be monitored and assessed.

16 Presentation slide 3.1 Early Years Foundation Stage The six areas of learning and development in the EYFS are: personal, social and emotional development communication, language and literacy problem solving, reasoning and numeracy knowledge and understanding of the world physical development creative development

17 Presentation slide 3.2 Elements of the communication, language and literacy area of learning and early learning goals Language for communication Language for thinking Linking sounds and letters Reading Writing Handwriting

18 Presentation slide 3.3 Foundation Stage Profile booklet

19 Presentation slide 3.4 Foundation Stage Profile Handbook

20 Presentation slide 4.1 John H Farniscan

21 Presentation slide 4.2 Phonics is... Phonics = + skills of segmentation and blending knowledge of the alphabetic code

22 Presentation slide 4.3 The alphabetic code ConsonantRepresentative wordsConsonantRepresentative words phoneme(corresponding letters in bold)phoneme(corresponding letters in bold) /b/baby/s/sun, mouse, city, science /d/dog/t/tap /f/field, photo/v/van /g/game/w/was h/hat/wh/where (regional) /j/judge, giant, barge/y/yes /k/cook, duck, Chris/z/zebra, please, is /l/lamb/th/thin /m/monkey, comb/ch/chip, watch /n/nut, knife, gnat/sh/ship, mission, chef /p/paper/zh/treasure /r/rabbit, wrong/ng/ring, sink

23 Pronouncing phonemes Presentation slide flmnrsshvthzx 2.cptchh 3.bdgwquy

24 Presentation slide 4.5 Phonics is... Phonics = + skills of segmentation and blending knowledge of the alphabetic code

25 Presentation slide 4.6a Letters and Sounds phase descriptors (1) PhaseDescriptorKnowledge 1 Developing, among other skills, phonological awareness without any teaching of graphic representations ( though children may of course know some letters) Explore and experiment with sounds and spoken words Distinguish between different sounds in the environment and phonemes Show awareness of rhyme and alliteration Begin to orally segment and blend words 2 Teaching children three related concepts: - Grapheme-phoneme correspondences - Blending - Segmenting Know that words are constructed from phonemes and that phonemes are represented by graphemes Know a small selection of common consonants and vowels which they can blend for reading and segment for spelling simple CVC words, eg. sit and tap

26 Presentation slide 4.6b Letters and Sounds phase descriptors (2) PhaseDescriptorKnowledge 3 Teaching 43 phonemes in the English language and their most common representations, including each of the long vowel phonemes: ee, ai, oa, ie, and both sounds for oo (moon, book) as well as or, ar, er, ow, oy, air, ear Consolidating the skills of blending and segmenting Starting to build a stock of high frequency words Blend and read single-syllable CVC words Segment and make a phonically plausible attempt at spelling CVC words Give the sound when shown the graphemes learnt in phases 2 and 3 Match the phase 2 and 3 phonemes to their grapheme 4 Teaching words containing adjacent consonants (CVCCs, CCVCs, etc.) Continuing to focus on blending and segmenting skills Increasing the stock of high frequency words Blend adjacent consonants in words and apply this skill when reading unfamiliar texts, eg. spoon, cried, nest Segment adjacent consonants in words and apply this in spelling

27 Presentation slide 4.6c Letters and Sounds phase descriptors (3) PhaseDescriptorKnowledge 5 Teaching children the concept of alternative representations of long vowel phonemes already taught and that some graphemes can be pronounced in more than one way eg. the letter g can be both hard as in gate and soft as in giant Teaching children to read phonically decodable two- and three-syllable words Increasing the stock of high frequency words Use alternative ways of pronouncing and spelling the graphemes corresponding to long vowel phonemes eg. /oe/ o-e, o, oa ow Read phonically decodable two- and three-syllable words e.g. bleating, frogspawn, shopkeeper Spell complex words using phonically plausible attempts 6 Teaching children less common grapheme– phoneme correspondences Embedding and consolidating the learning from previous phases to become fluent readers and increasingly accurate spellers Apply their phonic skills and knowledge to recognise and spell an increasing number of complex words Are secure with less common grapheme-phoneme correspondences, eg. could, two, laugh Can recognise phonic irregularities

28 Presentation slide 4.7a Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t Phases 3 and 4

29 Presentation slide 4.7b Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t Phases 3 and 4 b-l-a-n-k

30 Presentation slide 4.7c Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t d-o-ll Phases 3 and 4 b-l-a-n-k

31 Presentation slide 4.7d Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t d-o-ll Phases 3 and 4 b-l-a-n-k ch-i-p

32 Presentation slide 4.7e Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t d-o-ll c-u-ff Phases 3 and 4 b-l-a-n-k ch-i-p

33 Presentation slide 4.7f Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t d-o-ll c-u-ff Phases 3 and 4 b-l-a-n-k ch-i-p r-u-sh

34 Presentation slide 4.7g Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t d-o-ll c-u-ff l-i-ck Phases 3 and 4 b-l-a-n-k ch-i-p r-u-sh

35 Presentation slide 4.7h Phoneme count Phases 1 and 2 h-a-t d-o-ll c-u-ff l-i-ck Phases 3 and 4 b-l-a-n-k ch-i-p r-u-sh s-p-oo-n

36 Presentation slide 6.1 Phonics is... Phonics = + skills of segmentation and blending knowledge of the alphabetic code

37 Presentation slide 6.2a Letters and Sounds phase descriptors (1) PhaseDescriptorKnowledge 1 Developing, among other skills, phonological awareness without any teaching of graphic representations ( though children may of course know some letters) Explore and experiment with sounds and spoken words Distinguish between different sounds in the environment and phonemes Show awareness of rhyme and alliteration Begin to orally segment and blend words 2 Teaching children three related concepts: - Grapheme-phoneme correspondences - Blending - Segmenting Know that words are constructed from phonemes and that phonemes are represented by graphemes Know a small selection of common consonants and vowels which they can blend for reading and segment for spelling simple CVC words, eg. sit and tap

38 Presentation slide 6.2b Letters and Sounds phase descriptors (2) PhaseDescriptorKnowledge 3 Teaching 43 phonemes in the English language and their most common representations, including each of the long vowel phonemes: ee, ai, oa, ie, and both sounds for oo (moon, book) as well as or, ar, er, ow, oy, air, ear Consolidating the skills of blending and segmenting Starting to build a stock of high frequency words Blend and read single-syllable CVC words Segment and make a phonically plausible attempt at spelling CVC words Give the sound when shown the graphemes learnt in phases 2 and 3 Match the phase 2 and 3 phonemes to their grapheme 4 Teaching words containing adjacent consonants (CVCCs, CCVCs, etc.) Continuing to focus on blending and segmenting skills Increasing the stock of high frequency words Blend adjacent consonants in words and apply this skill when reading unfamiliar texts, eg. spoon, cried, nest Segment adjacent consonants in words and apply this in spelling

39 Presentation slide 6.2c Letters and Sounds phase descriptors (3) PhaseDescriptorKnowledge 5 Teaching children the concept of alternative representations of long vowel phonemes already taught and that some graphemes can be pronounced in more than one way eg. The letter g can be both hard as in gate and soft as in giant Teaching children to read phonically decodable two- and three-syllable words Increasing the stock of high frequency words Use alternative ways of pronouncing and spelling the graphemes corresponding to long vowel phonemes eg. /oe/o-e, o, oa ow Read phonically decodable two- and three-syllable words e.g. bleating, frogspawn, shopkeeper Spell complex words using phonically plausible attempts 6 Teaching children less common grapheme– phoneme correspondences Embedding and consolidating the learning from previous phases to become fluent readers and increasingly accurate spellers Apply their phonic skills and knowledge to recognise and spell an increasing number of complex words Are secure with less common grapheme-phoneme correspondences, eg. could, two laugh Can recognise phonic irregularities

40 Presentation slide 6.3 Vowel grapheme-phoneme correspondences trainshoutmeatfirstlightdewspoil latelateburndoortryboyroadmoontore laytermbeardownfieldstolestairs sweetcoinharetoecutecuteminemineroundborn

41 Presentation slide 6.4 Recognising vowel sounds: activity answers angelevenfindpostunion/blue trainsweetmineminetoecute layfieldtrystoledew latemeatlightroadmoon toyworkclownfairwarn coinburndownbeartore boytermshoutharedoor spoilfirstroundstairsborn

42 Presentation slide 7.1a ‘The simple view of reading’ (1) Key priorities for beginner readers: Language comprehension skills – understanding, interpreting, engaging with and responding to texts – through talking about and engaging with different texts Word recognition knowledge and skills through ‘high- quality phonic work’, as defined in the Rose Review and which is not a strategy so much as a body of knowledge, skills and understanding that has to be learnt

43 Presentation slide 7.1b ‘The simple view of reading’ (2)

44 Presentation slide 7.2a The beginner reader (1) Promoting enjoyment and language comprehension For beginner readers, it is important to: handle books enjoy stories and rhymes be able to re-tell stories and ask questions be encouraged to talk about books Use shared, guided and individual reading sessions to enhance learning by: helping children to develop their abilities to talk about the story/text explaining why things happen asking questions and so helping them gain language and reading comprehension

45 Presentation slide 7.2b The beginner reader (2) Daily discrete phonics teaching sessions will be central to word recognition teaching from reception It is time-limited – most children should be reading accurately and with confidence by the end of year 2 TAs will work with teachers to aid children’s successful learning by helping children to: know one grapheme for each of the 43 phonemes learn how to write each letter, forming it correctly produce the sounds as purely as possible frequently revise and practise so that responses are automatic link graphemes to phonemes

46 Presentation slide 7.2c The beginner reader (3) TAs will work with teachers to aid children’s successful learning by helping pupils to: know vowels and consonants – these should be taught from the start blend phonemes into words – blending and segmenting need to be taught explicitly so that pupils can decode and encode words. Segmenting words into phoneme aids understanding of spelling. understand that segmenting for spelling is the reverse of blending learn one grapheme for each of the 43 spoken sounds in English (see the phonics training part of this training). establish a store of familiar words

47 Presentation slide 7.3 Making learning to read successful and fun Ensure that reading is well planned so language comprehension and word skills build up systematically and in a meaningful way Reinforce and build on previous learning to secure children’s progress, making good use of regular assessments Link this work to the development of speaking and listening skills Make sure it is multisensory – use visual, auditory and kinaesthetic activities to enliven learning Provide an exciting and rich curriculum that engages pupils and makes learning meaningful to them Reinforce and apply phonic/reading and spelling knowledge and skills across the curriculum and in activities such as shared and guided reading Assess, monitor and modify teaching so children understand new knowledge and skills Follow the guidance in the Early Years Foundation Stage and Primary Framework (literacy).

48 Presentation slide 7.4 Understanding, interpreting, engaging and responding to texts The ability of understand and appreciate written texts continues to develop throughout life Consider how TAs and teachers might help children to: retrieve and describe events and ideas from text deduce, infer and interpret information use their understanding of words to develop an understanding of word meanings explain how writers use language to extend their knowledge and ideas read independently for purpose, pleasure and meaning respond imaginatively to texts using different ways to engage with it evaluate writers’ purposes and viewpoints to appreciate the effect. TAs and teachers will encourage many reading activities, including shared, guided and independent reading, sometimes using ICT.

49 Presentation slide 8.1 Teaching writing Writing strands in the Primary Framework: Creating and shaping texts Text structure and organisation Sentence structure and punctuation Presentation Writing should be taught through all areas of learning and underpinned by opportunities for speaking and listening. Writing is taught through a mixture of whole-class shared work, adult- led group and independent work and freely chosen activities.

50 Presentation slide 8.2 Developing handwriting skills 1. Activities to develop hand control jigsaws, glueing, threading, painting using pens or pencils for drawing, tracing, colouring 2. Learning to form letter-shapes (large-scale) ‘skywriting’ the letters in the air using a large brush and bucket of water to ‘paint’ a wall writing with a stick or finger in a sand tray writing big letters with chalk on the playground writing with big pens at an easel 3. Learning to write letter-shapes on paper: holding the pencil correctly spacing letters and words getting correct sizes: tall letters, short letters, etc.


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