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Primary National Strategy Teaching phonics and early reading in the renewed framework Day 1 of 2+1 Training © Crown Copyright 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Primary National Strategy Teaching phonics and early reading in the renewed framework Day 1 of 2+1 Training © Crown Copyright 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 Primary National Strategy Teaching phonics and early reading in the renewed framework Day 1 of 2+1 Training © Crown Copyright 2006

2 2 Aims of Session To develop a shared understanding of the Rose Report and its recommendations To raise awareness of high quality, systematic teaching of phonics To examine the 6 phases of phonic development To exemplify each phase through practical activities To consider phonic assessment and tracking

3 3 Agenda 9.30am Introduction The Rose Review Overview of the 6 phases Exemplification of each phase with practical activities 12 noon Lunch 1pmExemplification cont. Application of phonics across the curriculum Planning for a week Assessment and tracking The perfect phonic programme Gap task 3.30pm Questions and Close

4 © Crown Copyright The Rose Review Final Report, Jim Rose, March 2006

5 5 Reminder about the key findings: More attention needs to be given to speaking and listening from the outset High quality, systematic phonic work should be taught discretely and daily and in line with the definition of high quality phonic work as set out in the Rose report Phonics should be set within a broad and rich language curriculum that takes full account of developing the four interdependent strands of language For most children phonics teaching should start by the age of five, subject to the professional judgement of teachers and practitioners

6 6 Links to the Early Years Foundation Stage Compatible with each other Explicit expectations about continuity and progression in phonics Changes to an ELG

7 7 Links to the Renewed Framework Please look at ‘Core Learning in Literacy’ Strand 5.

8 8 Features of high quality phonic work: Brisk pace of learning Systematic Ambitious Enjoyable Time-limited part of the reading journey Progress is monitored carefully Teaching is adapted to achieve optimum progress for each child

9 9 What do our children need to learn? grapheme-phoneme correspondences blending (synthesising) phonemes in order segmenting words into their constituent phonemes that blending and segmenting are reversible processes

10 10 Grapheme Awareness (sound-symbol correspondence) When children are able to… discriminate, articulate and remember… a range of speech sounds, they are ready to link these sounds to specific letters or groups of letters.

11 11 Outline of Progression Phase 1 Through speaking and listening activities, children will develop their language structures and increase their vocabulary. In developing their phonological awareness, children will improve their ability to distinguish between sounds, and will become familiar with rhyme, rhythm and alliteration.

12 12 Outline of Progression cont… Phase 2 To introduce grapheme-phoneme (letter- sound) correspondences. Phase 3 To teach children one grapheme for each of the 44 phonemes in order to read and spell simple regular words.

13 13 Outline of Progression cont.. Phase 4 To teach children to read and spell words containing adjacent consonants. Phase 5 To teach children to recognise and use alternative ways of pronouncing the graphemes and spelling the phonemes already taught.

14 14 Outline of Progression cont.. Phase 6 To teach children to develop their skill and automaticity in reading and spelling, creating ever-increasing capacity to attend to reading for meaning.

15 15 Phase One In developing their phonological awareness children will improve their ability to distinguish between sounds and to speak clearly and audibly with confidence and control.

16 16 Video

17 17 Phase One Through speaking and listening activities, children will develop their language structures and increase their vocabulary.

18 18 Activity Look at the photographs of quality environment and routines Identify opportunities for –Child-initiated speaking and listening –Adult-led speaking and listening

19 19 Enjoy listening to noises Environmental Instrumental Speech sound discrimination Making sounds with their own voices

20 20 Phase One Outcomes Explore and experiment with sounds and words Listen attentively Show a growing awareness and appreciation of rhyme, rhythm and alliteration Speak clearly and audibly with confidence and control Distinguish between different sounds in words Develop awareness of the differences between phonemes

21 21 Phase Two To introduce grapheme-phoneme (letter-sound) correspondences

22 22 Phase Two Outcomes Children know that words are constructed from phonemes and that phonemes are represented by graphemes They have knowledge of a small selection of common consonants and vowels. They blend them together in reading simple CVC words and segment them to support spelling.

23 23 Model for the daily direct teaching of phonics skills Revisit and Review Teach Practise Apply

24 24 Phase Three To teach children one grapheme for each of the 44 phonemes in order to read and spell simple regular words.

25 25 Phase Three…. see handout Video and discussion

26 26 Phase Three Outcomes Children link sounds to letters, naming and sounding the letters of the alphabet. They recognise letter shapes and say a sound for each. They hear and say sounds in the order in which they occur in the word, They read simple words by sounding out and blending the phonemes all through the word from left to right. They recognise common digraphs and read some high frequency words.

27 27 Application

28 28 Application

29 29 Phase Four To teach children to read and spell words containing adjacent consonants. dog, black, flat, strip, chest

30 30 Phase Four….. see handout Activities from Playing with Sounds Phoneme frame – to spell words Sound buttons –blending Countdown for blending Silly sentences Quickwrite for spelling Full circle – spelling NSEW Discussion

31 31 b e l t

32 32 n e s t

33 33 f r o g

34 34 Phase Four Outcomes Children are able to blend and segment adjacent consonants in words They apply this skill when reading unfamiliar texts and in spelling.

35 35 Phase Five Teaching children to recognise and use alternative ways of pronouncing the graphemes and spelling the phonemes already taught.

36 36 Same letters, different sounds mean bread read

37 37 Same sound, different letters may makemake pain

38 © Crown Copyright i a e o u vowels

39 39 Long Vowels /e/ /ee/

40 40 Long or Short ? Listen to the words. Long /ee/ or short /e/? Show me!

41 41 A Real Treat Tom was very happy. It was the weekend and he was off to the beach with his mum and dad, his puppy and baby Pete. ‘Help me pack the green bag,’ said mum. ‘We need sun cream and lots to eat.’ Tom got into his seat in the back of the car and the puppy got on his knee. Pete held his toy sheep. Off they went. Beep! Beep! At the end of the street there was a big truck. It had lost a wheel. ‘Oh, no,’ said Tom. ‘We’ll be here for a week!’ Dad went to speak to the driver to see if he could help.

42 42 A Real Treat Tom was very happy. It was the weekend and he was off to the beach with his mum and dad, his puppy and baby Pete. ‘Help me pack the green bag,’ said mum. ‘We need sun cream and lots to eat.’ Tom got into his seat in the back of the car and the puppy got on his knee. Pete held his toy sheep. Off they went. Beep! Beep! At the end of the street there was a big truck. It had lost a wheel. ‘Oh, no,’ said Tom. ‘We’ll be here for a week!’ Dad went to speak to the driver to see if he could help.

43 43 Sorting by grapheme y ee ea e e_e

44 44 Phase Five Outcomes Children will: use alternative ways of pronouncing the graphemes and spelling the phonemes corresponding to long vowel phonemes. identify the constituent parts of two-syllable and three- syllable words and be able to read and spell phonically decodable two-syllable and three-syllable words. recognise an increasing number of high frequency words automatically. apply phonic knowledge and skills as the prime approach in reading and spelling when the words are unfamiliar and not completely decodable.

45 45 Progression and pace sheet Please look at yellow sheet: Phases and activities Phase 3 sub-divided for purposes of assessment and tracking Suggested timescales

46 46 Phase Six Teaching children to develop their skill and automaticity in reading and spelling, creating ever- increasing capacity to attend to reading for meaning.

47 47 Model for the daily direct teaching of phonics skills Revisit and Review Teach Practise Apply

48 48 Phase Six Outcomes Children apply their phonic skills and knowledge to recognise and spell an increasing number of complex words. They read an increasing number of high and medium frequency words independently and automatically.

49 49 Progression and Pace Using the yellow handout as a prompt, do the new phases present any implications for teaching phonics in your class?

50 50 Steps to Phases CLLD Phonic phasesPlaying with sounds Steps CGFS –CLL –Linking sounds and letters (also see FS profile and NLS) i2-4 3ii2-4 3iii2-4 +elements of and beyond and beyond

51 51 Application of phonics teaching This should happen in shared and guided reading and writing, and across the curriculum. Refer to the handout: Application of phonic skills and knowledge in shared and guided sessions.

52 52 Application across the curriculum

53 53 Developing learning across a week Discrete daily teaching of phonics Daily application in shared reading and writing Daily application across the curriculum Application in guided reading Application in guided writing

54 54 Assessment Formative –Assessment for learning –Ongoing Summative –Assessment of learning

55 55 Formative assessment Observation –Spontaneous –Planned Significant comments Record of Achievement/Portfolio

56 56 Summative assessment Foundation Stage Profile Tracking sheet End-of-year reports

57 57 Assessing the Phases Scenarios Activity

58 58 Gap Task Look at the model for the daily teaching of phonics. Use this model to plan your phonic teaching for one week. Use the ‘Indicators of good practice: phonic work’ to assess the quality of phonic work in your school. (see yellow handout) Be prepared to feedback your findings on Day 2 of training.

59 59 Choosing a phonics programme The selected programme should be: implemented with fidelity; fully compatible with a broad, rich curriculum; systematic, with a clearly defined and structured progression; delivered in discrete daily sessions at a brisk pace; matched to children’s developing abilities; underpinned by a synthetic approach to blending phonemes in order all through a word to read it; multi-sensory, encompassing various visual, auditory and kinaesthetic activities.

60 60 Choosing a phonics programme The selected programme should: make clear that blending and segmenting are reversible processes; offer clear guidance on how to assess progress to inform next steps for learning; offer guidance on how to adapt the programme for children with SEN or who have missed earlier elements. make clear the importance of speaking and listening as the foundation for embarking on a systematic phonics programme;

61 61 What ever phonics programme is chosen, it is important to implement it with fidelity!

62 62 Questions and Close


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