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PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE 2014 ASSEMBLY OF STUDENT DELEGATES ANNUAL MEETING.

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Presentation on theme: "PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE 2014 ASSEMBLY OF STUDENT DELEGATES ANNUAL MEETING."— Presentation transcript:

1 PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE 2014 ASSEMBLY OF STUDENT DELEGATES ANNUAL MEETING

2 ASD ANNUAL MEETING The Assembly of Student Delegates (ASD) provides a mechanism for the expression of student concerns and offers a means whereby students can have effective input into the affairs of AOTA. Annually, ASD Representatives from OT and OTA educational programs across the country meet to represent their school at the ASD Pre-Conference Meeting.

3 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY’S DISTINCT VALUE Amy Jo Lamb, OTD, OTRL, FAOTA How is occupational therapy distinctly different from other health professions? Occupational therapy recognizes the effects of everyday life on health and well being. “The context surrounding the practice of occupational therapy demands not only the mere identification of value we bring to health care but articulating that value to our clients, other health care professionals, organizational administrators, payers, and policymakers” (Lamb, 2014). Watch and share Tweet #OTdistinctvalue What is the value of occupational therapy?  healthcare costs  hospital readmission  independence  life satisfaction

4 PUT EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE: JOIN THE EVIDENCE EXCHANGE PROJECT What is the Evidence Exchange? Central repository for Critically Appraised Papers (CAPs), at-a-glance summaries of the findings and methods of selected individual articles. Provides mechanism for sharing information, maximizing capacity, and avoiding duplication of reviews. Ongoing Opportunities for Student Participation Submit a CAP for inclusion in the Evidence Exchange. Criteria for article selection, appraisal process, forms, and guidelines provided on the AOTA website. Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT, FAOTA

5 PUT EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE: JOIN THE EVIDENCE EXCHANGE PROJECT (continued) Benefits of Evidence Exchange to Users and Profession Completed products may qualify as part of master’s- and doctoral-level coursework or independent study. Recognizes excellent, professional-level work of faculty, students, and clinicians. Expands the availability of expanded EBP resources for members. Facilitates stronger linkages between research, education, and practice. Puts the Centennial Vision into practice. Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT, FAOTA

6 SPECIAL INTEREST SECTIONS AOTA's Special Interest Sections (SISs) connect members to a vast number of colleagues in the field and areas of interest through Quarterly Newsletters, discussion forums, and professional networking communities. Kimberly Hartmann, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Special Interest Sections (SISs) Administration & Management SISDevelopmental Disabilities SIS Education SISEarly Intervention & School SIS Gerontology SISHome & Community Health SIS Mental Health SISPhysical Disabilities SIS Sensory Integration SISTechnology SIS Work & Industry SIS

7 SPECIAL INTEREST SECTIONS (continued) Roles for Students Contribute to OT Connections SIS forums. Contact your SIS of interest and volunteer. Read the Quarterly Newsletters. Apply to become a student intern. Kimberly Hartmann, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

8 WHY ADVOCACY MATTERS Policy impacts every area of practice. Advocacy is an investment in the profession’s future and ultimately in your career. Clear policies will limit others’ ability to encroach on OT practice areas and protect consumers. Other professionals will be advocating for their role – When we’re silent, we lose! Advocacy changes policy. John Ray, AOTA Legislative Representative

9 WHY ADVOCACY MATTERS (continued) AOTA’s Role in Advocacy AOTA Federal Affairs Crafts, tracks, and influences legislation in Congress. Promotes best interest of the profession. Educates members of Congress. Collaborates with groups with shared interests. Supports and encourages grassroots activities. AOTA Regulatory Affairs Advocates for the profession with federal agencies. Analyzes and advocates on federal regulatory changes. Communicates the policy changes to AOTA members. AOTA State Affairs Monitors and analyzes all state legislation. Provides assistance to state OT associations on the key issues in each state. John Ray, AOTA Legislative Representative

10 WHY ADVOCACY MATTERS; EMPOWERMENT THROUGH POLITICAL ACTION What legislation is important to our profession? Medicare Outpatient Rehabilitation Therapy Cap – Arbitrary cap on outpatient therapy under Medicare set in – Congress just passed a 12-month “patch” extending the exceptions process through March 31, – Working on a long-term solution. Mental health – Working to pass the Occupational Therapy Mental Health Act (HR 1037 and S 1815) which will make occupational therapists eligible to participate in the National Health Services Corps [NHSC] Scholarship and Loan Repayment Programs as mental and behavioral health professionals. – Working to expand roles of OT practitioners in community settings and schools. John Ray, AOTA Legislative Representative Gail Fisher, MPA, OTR/L, FAOTA, AOTPAC Chair

11 What legislation is important to our profession? Quality initiatives – Ensure that OT is included in quality initiatives designed to better measure the quality of care and data; this includes better measuring outcomes and costs for post-acute care and development of quality indicators for inpatient rehab facilities. Home health – Allow OT to be the first professional to treat in the home. Scope of practice – Other professions trying to expand their role and limit our role (i.e., athletic trainers, physical therapists, recreational therapists, speech- language pathologists John Ray, AOTA Legislative Representative Gail Fisher, MPA, OTR/L, FAOTA, AOTPAC Chair WHY ADVOCACY MATTERS; EMPOWERMENT THROUGH POLITICAL ACTION

12 EMPOWERMENT THROUGH POLITICAL ACTION The American Occupational Therapy Political Action Committee (AOTPAC) is the political action arm of AOTA that complements AOTA’s public policy agenda and supports its lobbying efforts. AOTPAC raises funds from members and OT/OTA student organizations. The AOTPAC Board, made up of OT practitioners, recommends contributions to key legislators and candidates that support our causes. AOTPAC contributions help to elect and re-elect our allies who share our priorities. AOTA lobbyists can use AOTPAC contributions to attend fundraisers and get one-on-one time with legislators and their staff. Gail Fisher, MPA, OTR/L, FAOTA

13 EMPOWERMENT THROUGH POLITICAL ACTION (continued) Ways for students to get involved in political action Contact your school’s Assembly of Student Delegates (ASD) representative to find out how your OT or OTA student organization can assist AOTPAC through the Student Challenge. AOTPAC can only solicit contributions from AOTA members. AOTA membership dues cannot be used to support candidates. The most basic level of advocacy is AOTA membership. Join now and maintain your membership so that your dues can be used to support the voice of OT on Capitol Hill. Engage in advocacy efforts sponsored by AOTA, such as calls to contact your representative about a particular issue. Attend Capitol Hill Day on Monday, September 15 th in Washington, DC, for a free legislative briefing followed by visits to your U.S. Representatives and Senators. Use the Legislative Action Center on the AOTA website to send a quick regarding a bill to your Representative or Senator. Gail Fisher, MPA, OTR/L, FAOTA If you don’t stand for OT, who will?

14 Multicultural Diversity Initiative (MDI) Network Multicultural Diversity Initiative (MDI) is independent groups supporting the profession’s goal to increase diversity and inclusion. MDI provides – a caucus for a collective voice, – support for students in understanding various cultures and impact on patient care, – support for faculty in addressing the needs of diverse students, and – support for practitioners meeting needs of clients in diverse settings. Multicultural Networking Groups – Asian/Pacific Heritage Occupational Therapy Association (APHOTA) – National Black Occupational Therapy Caucus (NBOTC) – Network for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Concerns in Occupational Therapy (The Network) – Network for Native American Practitioners (NNAP) – Network for Occupational Therapy Practitioners with Disabilities and Their Supporters (NOTPD) – Orthodox Jewish Occupational Therapy Chavursa (OJOTC) – Terapia Ocupacional para Diversidad, Oportunidad y Solidaridad (TODOS) Network of Hispanic Practitioners Hector L. Borrero, MBA, OTR/L, CAPS; & Rivka Molinsky, PhD, OTR/L

15 Multicultural Diversity Initiative (MDI) Network (continued) Students’ Role in the MDI Network Advocate for diversity and inclusion among peers, classmates, and friends at educational institutions. Encourage your peers to join the network that meets their needs. Hector L. Borrero, MBA, OTR/L, CAPS; & Rivka Molinsky, PhD, OTR/L

16 REVITALIZING A SOTA Top 10 Tips for Student Occupational Therapy Associations Use social media (e.g., organization website, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and keep it up-to-date. Advocate for promoting occupational therapy at SOTA events, such as through passing out fliers and explaining the value of the profession to others. Stay organized and consistent. Make meetings fun and interesting (i.e., plan a themed meeting such as pajama night, beach party, or adaptive cooking night). Inform SOTA members and potential members about the benefits of getting involved. Samantha Simons, OTS; Mary Georgen, OTS; Stephanie Fay, OTS; Erin Landgraf, OTS; & Cynthia Matlock, MBA, OTR/L, Faculty Mentor

17 REVITALIZING A SOTA (continued) Tips for SOTAs (continued) Let all SOTA members know your mission and goals for the year, as well as AOTA’s purpose and mission. Reward members who are involved (i.e., annual awards, social celebrations). Transition new leadership early. Officers will better understand their roles for the next year if the past leader provides mentorship. Let members have a say in the organization by opening meetings for discussion and encouraging participation. Get involved in your state and national OT association. Encourage participation in state and national conferences. Samantha Simons, OTS, Mary Georgen, OTS, Stephanie Fay, OTS; Erin Landgraf, OTS, & Cynthia Matlock, MBA, OTR/L, Faculty Mentor

18 Presidential Address: Leading into your Future Develop your connections. Be open to opportunities. Find and exercise your voice— advocate. Pay attention to needs in your practice and your profession— innovate. Seek out, use, and add evidence. Know that clarity will come. Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel, PhD, OT, BCMH, FAOTA

19 GET INVOLVED Create a volunteer profile in the AOTA COOL Database. Apply for fieldwork opportunities at AOTA. Apply to AOTA’s Emerging Leaders Development Program. Attend the 2014 AOTA/NBCOT National Student Conclave in St. Louis, Missouri, November 14-15, 2014, and AOTA Annual Conference & Expo in Nashville, TN, April 16-19, Follow ASD and AOTA on social media (i.e., OT Connections, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube). Set up a Boardroom to Classroom presentation for your peers, a 1-hour-long teleconference to increase knowledge about professional issues and opportunities. Ask your ASD Representative about more opportunities to get involved.

20 GET INVOLVED You are the future of the profession. Pledge to stay an active AOTA member after graduation, through your transition to professional practice, and through the 100 th anniversary of occupational therapy in 2017 and beyond. Join the Centennial Commitment today at

21 REFERENCES Bondoc, S. (2014, April 2). Put evidence into practice: Join the Evidence Exchange project. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD. Borrerro, H., & Molinsky, R. (2014, April 2). MDI network. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD. Fisher, G. (2014, April 2). AOTPAC: Empowerment through political action. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD. Hartmann, K. (2014, April 2). Special Interest Sections. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD. Lamb, A. (2014, April 2). Occupational therapy’s distinct value. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD. Ray, J. (2014, April 2). Why advocacy matters. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD. Simons, S., Georgen, G., Fay, S., Landgraf, E., & Matlock, C. (2014, April 2). Revitalizing a SOTA. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD. Stoffel, G. (2014, April 2). Presidential address: Leading into your future. PowerPoint presented at the Assembly of Student Delegates Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD.


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