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Tech Transfer Marketing Metrics in the Digital Age: What’s Working and What’s Wasting Time and Money? Thursday, November 8, 2012 Teresa Fazio, PhD Portfolio.

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Presentation on theme: "Tech Transfer Marketing Metrics in the Digital Age: What’s Working and What’s Wasting Time and Money? Thursday, November 8, 2012 Teresa Fazio, PhD Portfolio."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tech Transfer Marketing Metrics in the Digital Age: What’s Working and What’s Wasting Time and Money? Thursday, November 8, 2012 Teresa Fazio, PhD Portfolio Analyst Columbia Technology Ventures Cara Michaliszyn Marketing Manager University of New Mexico-STC Margaret Elliott, MPH Marketing & Communications Manager Columbia Technology Ventures

2 Outline Branding: Why a brand is important E-Marketing Mix General Metrics for Tracking Brand Marketing Marketing Videos Email marketing Using student interns to prepare & launch marketing documents Company lists and resources for targeted marketing Email templates Using e-Marketing for Faculty Outreach Keys to writing an Effective Web Brief Optimizing Content for Search Engine Visibility Leveraging Social Media Lessons learned

3 Marketing by medium

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7 Do you employ SEO metrics?

8 Survey Results

9 Using the power of the Digital Age to Build your Brand Why is brand important? Brand increases awareness and recall – your technology transfer office (TTO) is the source of technology University inventions are generally not developed in response to market need Brand increases familiarity/comfort level with TTO Brand motivates licensee diligence/ respect Brand creates the opportunity for pull marketing rather than push Brand expands outreach efforts locally, nationally and internationally for TTO’s technologies and the organization

10 E-marketing Mix Website – Flintbox (or other technology showcase site) contains technology briefs Inquiries/established companies directly contact TTO – Press releases/newsletters – Communication – Promotion Subscribe to profile alerts – (i.e. LifeSciencesLink, CommNexus, etc.) Webinars to entrepreneurs & investors Utilize GoToMeeting, AdobeConnect, etc. Direct Marketing via Email – Solicit commercial interest and corporate relationships Social Media – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, Blog

11 Track Brand Marketing TTO Website and Technology Portfolio (Flintbox, iBridge, Nouvant, etc.) – Analytics Daily visitors Pageviews Social Media shares Domain names Press releases – Create awareness that TTO is a source of innovative technology – Create buzz around technology – Track inquiries based on press releases Newsletter E-mag – Track views, technology inquiries Blog – focused on all activities not just technology – Creating awareness – Track followers

12 Marketing Videos Educate your constituencies about the research happening at your University and that your TTO is the source of technology/patents Use marketing videos to: Educate university researchers about TTO and inform them of how to disclose to the TTO General outreach Create additional promotional material that can be used in email marketing Highlights prolific inventors and their success stories Create awareness Start off with a cheap camera and do minimal editing. If see increased interest or a direct licensing deal as a result of videos, invest more.

13 Email Marketing Program Average success rate with 400 campaigns sent 2008-2012: 21% click-through rate 10% reply rate Reasons for doing email marketing: Extend the reach of our licensing officers Even if a technology isn’t licensed, the program can be helpful: Get market feedback before a major patent decision The PI knows we are putting the invention out there. Launches & responses monitored through a central Outlook mailbox Salesforce can also be used Metrics: Clicks, Bounces, Opens, Replies

14 Using Student Interns to Prepare E-Marketing One intern completes entire “marketing package” per technology Launched from central mailbox 3 parts to a typical marketing assignment: 1.“Company List” of Potential Licensees (4 hours, $80) - Compilation of email addresses using internal & external sources 2.Email Template (1 hour, $20) - Sent to companies with links to a Tech Brief 3.Tech Brief (4 hours, $80) -Posted on websites, both ours & external -Nonconfidential technology description -Use SEO best practices

15 Company Lists – Resources Student interns search business databases to find relevant companies We maintain an internal contacts database Full-text searchable by company names, keywords, positions, etc. “Constant gardening” is key! We include a section to note contacts’ specific fields of interest Database tips & tricks: Jigsaw & mailtester.com can help confirm email addresses

16 Email Templates Brief, non-confidential overview of the invention Do not disclose anything that would enable someone knowledgeable in the field to practice the invention Just a sentence or two to distill the technology & pique interest Must align with corporate strategy Needs to be compelling to a diverse audience Initial reader may lack technical background Come up with a memorable “tweet” Enable auto-forward of replies to specific licensing officer through centralized email inbox Needs to make a quick and lasting impression May be the only impression a company gets of an invention Show target how the invention can help a company and / or its products, e.g. Improve R&D efficiency / effectiveness Save time Decrease costs Purely non-confidential information Description and ObjectivesKey Lessons

17 Using Email Marketing for Faculty Outreach Scheduled email blasts : –Recently Issued Patent Notices: Congratulatory e-mail to all named inventors who are active employees, sent to relevant faculty weekly –Publications: E-mail to authors of publications, with a reminder to file an invention report, sent to relevant faculty, monthly –Initial Commercial Assessment: Sent to all named potential inventors on the invention disclosure form one week after invention report submission –New Faculty & Research Staff Welcome: A welcome/introductory e-mail to all new faculty and research staff who have been hired within the preceding four-month term. –Grant Proposals and Awards: An email to faculty who have submitted or been awarded a grant proposal, sent to relevant faculty monthly Effort to improve internal branding Metrics tracked: Opens, bounces, responses

18 Technology Briefs: Posted on our website Must be: Scientifically accurate Detailed enough to elicit interest Consistent with patent claims; don’t oversell! We implement search engine optimization May be published in PR newsletter or on blog One-page flyer can be shared with companies Outline of sections: Headings Descriptions Inventor bio Applications & Advantages Patent Information Publication Information

19 Write your Story: Ask “The Big Questions” – What’s the technology? What does it do? – How does it do that? – How can we prove it does that? – Why would a licensee want it? – What are some similar products or technologies? – What makes it better or different from these? – How would you describe it to someone who doesn’t know what it is ? – What do I get if I license it?

20 SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION: What is it? The process of making a webpage easily consumable for both humans and search engine robots. The SEO elements will draw potential customers to the technology page when they search online (Google) for terms relevant to the technology. The well-written content and information on the technology page will grab their interest and hopefully compel them to license the technology. SEO is not magic! *Tell a great story*, then worry about optimization. Source: SEOmoz: The Beginners’ Guide to SEO

21 SEO Mechanics Before You Start Optimizing: Search the internet as you would for the technology you’re describing. Choose non-specific identifiers (i.e. NOT a proprietary name) Continue searching until your search yields pages that very closely resemble your topic Google highlights matching words This gives hints on how to best describe your technology so it can be found by others ON THE WEB.

22 Where to use Keywords: Title, URL, Browser Tab Headings Early in the content (preferably in the first sentence) Links Bulleted lists Image file names, "Alt text“ labels, and captions Attachment file names Remember: Humans are your primary audience!. SEO can draw a potential customer to the page. But only clear, understandable writing about the technology’s value will keep them reading and lead to a license!

23 Leveraging Social Media Select Platforms Follow, Like, Engage Track Metrics Interactions per number of fans/followers by month or week Clicks to website via social media platforms Integrating other resources:

24 Lessons Learned – Digital marketing is only a tool – Use technology to drive services with greater efficiency – Social media tools can help but don’t overly rely on them – Track and analyze your metrics, use them to inform how you direct your efforts – Keep learning, trying new platforms and engaging with new audiences

25 Not everything has to be digital Other aspects of marketing just as important in the mix and just as important to track – Leads from Inventors – Research sponsorships – Mailing via USPS to industries not familiar with University TTOs – Events – Printed materials – Plus, too many email blasts can lead to TTO messages turning into spam

26 QUESTIONS? Utilize the public chat at the bottom left of your screen to submit your question. The panel will address them in the order they are received. Thank You!

27 Thank you! Any questions about the content of this talk? Reach out to us: Teresa Fazio, PhD Portfolio Analyst Columbia Technology Ventures taf2102@columbia.edu Cara Michaliszyn Marketing Manager University of New Mexico-STC cmichaliszyn@stc.unm.edu Margaret Elliott, MPH Marketing & Communications Manager Columbia Technology Ventures me2304@columbia.edu


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