Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Maryland Multicultural Conference Welcome to: Presenters: Dr. Celeste D. Saxton, Supervisor, Curriculum & Instructional Resources Carroll County Public.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Maryland Multicultural Conference Welcome to: Presenters: Dr. Celeste D. Saxton, Supervisor, Curriculum & Instructional Resources Carroll County Public."— Presentation transcript:

1 Maryland Multicultural Conference Welcome to: Presenters: Dr. Celeste D. Saxton, Supervisor, Curriculum & Instructional Resources Carroll County Public Schools, Westminster, Maryland and Ms. Connie Harris, HSDOP Liberty High School

2 Introductions and Sharing…

3 Outcomes: --To effectively address the issue of High School Dropout Prevention in our schools. --To identify the signals for students at risk. and how these signals impact academic success. -- To rethink what our school systems can do to address the issue of dropouts in our schools. -- To learn strategies presented in the documentary, INSIDEOUT, to effectively speak with students who are at – risk for dropping out. --To identify the 5 Top Reasons for students to remain in school and to graduate with a diploma.

4 Why do you think the title “UNDROPPABLE” was chosen for this presentation?

5 How well do we know our students?

6 Private vs. Public Self

7 How a student presents him/herself in the classroom may or may not be the reality of what is happening in the student’s life.

8 First Impressions Are first impressions really accurate?

9 How does the unseen impact a student’s academic success?  Test scores  Report card grades  Attendance  Special education and EL status  Gender  Age  Race/ethnic background ATTENDANCE MULTIPLE MOVES AGE GENDER

10 Which one of these students comes from a dysfunctional home?

11 How do our preconceived notions affect our students ? To Sir With Love, 1967 HSDOP Is Not A New Concept!

12 These are our “at risk” students and they have been in schools forever. Welcome Back, Kotter (1975 – 1979)

13 Jaime Alfonso Escalante Gutierrez (December 31, 1930 – March 30, 2010) was a Bolivian educator well known for teaching students calculus from 1974 to 1991 at Garfield High School, East Los Angeles, California. Escalante was the subject of the 1988 film Stand and Deliver, in which he is portrayed by Edward James Olmos.BoliviancalculusGarfield High School, East Los Angeles, California1988Stand and DeliverEdward James Olmos

14 Fast Forward…Today’s Students Scenes From Glee

15 Four questions about EWIs…Early Warning Indicators  What are the characteristics of a good EWI system?  What are the signals?  What technological and organizational infrastructure is needed to “capture” the signal?  What can schools and districts do once the signals are identified and captured?

16 Characteristics of a good EWI system Empirically developed: The “signals” are identified through analysis of longitudinal data for prior cohorts of students. High accuracy: A high percentage of students with the “signals” drop out. Conversely, a low percentage of students without the “signals” graduate. High yield: These “signals” capture most of the dropouts (avoiding the “1% problem”). Accessible data: Data that provide the “signals” are readily available and relatively inexpensive to access.

17 How did we identify the “signals” of eventual dropouts? Empirical analysis of cohorts in Philadelphia, starting with 6 th graders (Balfanz, Herzog, & MacIver), and 8 th graders (Neild & Balfanz, 2006) Data scan of longitudinal student record data  Test scores  Report card grades  Attendance  Multiple Moves  Behavioral Issues/Suspensions  Special education and EL status  Gender  Age  Race/ethnic background

18 Focusing in on what you and others can do to identify these students  Choosing a “strong signal” – students who are at highest risk of dropping out  By not making the net too broad, scarce resources can be targeted at those students who are at greatest risk.

19 The Big Four in 6 th grade  Failing Math  Failing English  Attendance <80%  At least one poor behavior mark (Balfanz, Herzog, & MacIver)

20 8 th grade warning signals Three factors gave students at least a 75% probability of dropping out: 1.Failing math in 8 th grade 2.Failing English in 8 th grade 3.Attending less than 80% of the time 4.54% of the dropouts sent one or more of these signals in 8 th grade

21 Had an 8 th grade “signal” Did not have an 8th grade signal: Passed 8th grade English Passed 8th grade Math Attended at least 80% of the time

22 Three factors gave students at least a 75% probability of dropping out: 1.Earning fewer than 2 credits 2.Not being promoted to 10 th grade 3.Attending less than 70% of the time 4.80% of the dropouts sent one or more of these signals in 8 th or 9 th grade 9 th Grade Signals

23 Academic Achievement How does poverty affect students?

24 Dispelling the Myth KWL for educators ● KNOW—Low-income children often have a harder time achieving in school. ● WANT to Know—How can what happens in schools from 8 am to 3 pm make a difference? ● Need to LEARN—How to see opportunity gaps instead of achievement gaps /feature/poverty-myth

25 Rethinking Suspending Hope Schools in Maryland and Connecticut are rethinking suspension policies and practices. They are finding that promoting positive behavior choices rather than punishing the negative is leading to higher graduation rates, especially among students of color.

26 75% - 81% OF ALL INMATES ARE HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUTS

27 The Inside Out documentary presents a stark look at prison life -- with inmates telling their personal stories of regret for not pursuing an education and graduating. Stewart compassionately interviews the inmates and unveils their genuine hope to give others the chance they no longer have, to avoid the pitfalls of dropping out of school. All of the inmates interviewed are either serving life sentences or life without parole.

28

29 Dropouts are more than eight times as likely to be in jail or prison as high school graduates. What percent of high school dropouts get their GED and attend college? GED stands for General Equivalency Development. As the name implies, the GED was designed as a high school equivalency test for non-graduates. Answer: Only about 8 percent of dropouts who get their GED go to college.

30 Top 5 Reasons to Stay in School 1. High school dropouts are four times as likely to be unemployed as those who have completed four or more years of college. 2. Graduating from high school will determine how well you live for the next 50 years of your life. High school graduates earn $143 more per week than high school dropouts. College graduates earn $336 more per week than high school graduates ($479 more per week than high school dropouts). 3. Dropouts are more likely to apply for and receive public assistance than graduates of high school. 4. Dropouts comprise a disproportionate percentage of the nation's prison and death row inmates. 75% - 81% of prisoners in America are high school dropouts. 5. School districts all over the country provide alternative programs for students who are not successful in the usual school setting.

31 Dropouts: One is too many!


Download ppt "Maryland Multicultural Conference Welcome to: Presenters: Dr. Celeste D. Saxton, Supervisor, Curriculum & Instructional Resources Carroll County Public."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google