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© Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-1 Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner Chapter.

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Presentation on theme: "© Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-1 Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner Chapter."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-1 Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner Chapter 2: Re-engineering and Enterprise Resource Planning Systems

2 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-2 Objectives Recognize factors associated with the evolution of ERP systems –BPR –Client-server networking –Integrated databases Examine role of process modeling in redesigning business models

3 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-3 Re-engineering Fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes Goal is to achieve major improvements in performance Efficient redesign of value chain –Primary activities Inbound logistics, operations, outbound logistics, marketing and sales, service –Secondary activities Organizational activities, human resources, technology, purchasing Motivations –Deregulation, consolidation, customer sophistication, increased competition

4 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-4

5 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-5 Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) Technology used to mechanize work Create new business rules Remove outdated rules Improve responsiveness Reduce costs

6 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-6 Business Process Re-engineering (BPR), continued Decentralize decision making –Become responsive to customer’s needs –Flatten organization Facilitated by information technology Redesign of jobs –New levels of judgment –New types of leaders Adaptable

7 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-7

8 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-8 Process Modeling Business process –Business activities Data store –Data needed by business process Data flow –Data transferred between processes or from a process to data store Organizational unit –Units where processes take place Event –Includes triggers and outcomes

9 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-9 Neighborhood Food Cooperative Weekly cycle Members submit list Lists merged Orders placed for product by phone Suppliers confirm in writing with invoice Shipments made to cooperative Members collect product Cooperative pays net 10 days

10 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-10 Basis for Best Practices Supported by ERP Modules Re-engineered process models –Improved process change depictions Data integration –Among multiple processes Structural changes –Streamline business functions –Maximized productivity

11 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-11 Reliable Finance Company Expansion required redesign of existing system Needs enhanced information system Increase number of branches exponentially Achieve a competitive advantage Analysis of loan application system –Reduce approval from days to 2-3 days –Improve access to databases for approval decisions

12 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-12 Failure in Re-engineering Rosenthal: –Apply “clean slate” approach Continuous training for new roles Measure performance Jobs must be redesigned Use rewards as incentives to change –Move away from status quo –Too narrowly focused –Project too general

13 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-13 Information Technology Facilitates ERP Client-server computing allows for increase power and control Integrated databases –Reduces redundancy Increases data consistency –Supports multiple functional units –Data maintained separately from application modules –Database management systems Central data administration Improved data integrity Improved control

14 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-14 Process Enterprises Changed management structures –Process responsibility given to “process owners” Has process design authority –Stresses teamwork –Leans toward standardization of processes –Focuses on achieving goals

15 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-15 Case: Re-engineering the Payment Process System at RFC Current payment processing system –Customers: Make payments at branch –Cash, check, money order Mail payments to branch –Manually processed –Batched for deposit in afternoon –Home Office mailed an Advice of Payment Received Payment made to Home Office –Manually processed –Batched for deposit in afternoon –Branch mailed an Advice of Payment Received –Each night, batch payment processing runs to update accounts

16 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-16 Case: Re-engineering the Payment Process System at RFC, continued Weekly delinquency analysis run Payment reminders sent out at 15, 30, 45, and 60 days –Computer generated Settlement figures processed upon request –Urgent requests take overnight Major expansion planned

17 © Prentice Hall, 2005: Enterprise Resource Planning, 1 st Edition by Mary Sumner 2-17 Summary BPR allows the organization to rethink and radically redesign their business processes Process modeling of business activities change organizational management structures ERP systems are facilitated by IT Processes are standardized and teamwork enhanced


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