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Creating Community Through Homeless Prevention April 23, 2013 Rethink Homelessness.

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Presentation on theme: "Creating Community Through Homeless Prevention April 23, 2013 Rethink Homelessness."— Presentation transcript:

1 Creating Community Through Homeless Prevention April 23, 2013 Rethink Homelessness

2 Our Purpose Today To raise awareness of the problem of homelessness in Plano, Texas. To connect faith communities and begin collaborative efforts to proactively lead community solutions to homelessness. Rethink Homelessness

3 2012 Collin County Homeless Data 3

4 Primary Reasons for Homelessness 4 Source: Collin County 2012 Annual Point-in-Time Homeless Count

5 5 PLANO’S HOMELESS – WHERE ARE THEY?

6 6

7 Plano & Collin County Available Shelter Resources 7

8 PLANO’S HOMELESS – WHERE ARE THEY? 8 EXTENDED STAY HOTELS – Sun Suites and other extended stay hotels in Plano serve as make shift homeless shelter. PISD PROVIDES BUS SERVICE TO SUN SUITES Dwayne Hill, his wife Denise Collier and their 4 children shared 1 room at Sun Suites; Dwayne has a college degree

9 Invisible Homeless 9 Source: Census Bureau Credit: NPR

10 10 Invisible Homeless – Especially children & youth

11 PLANO POVERTY & HOMELESS INDICATORS 11 Plano Independent School District Data: actual homeless students est. to be 4 x reported; actual students on SBP/NSLP is < total who would qualify. Pride and residency deter many applications. PISD Students Reported Homeless 2013APPROX PISD School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program (SBP/NSLP) AS OF TOTAL STUDENTS SBP/NSLP STUDENTS% Mar-13 54,982 15,39128% Nov-11 55,654 14,46126% EST ,000 10,00018% Plano, Texas Profile Population 2010 Census (quickfacts.census.gov) 269,776 poverty rate 2009 (city-data.com)10.7% Est persons living at US poverty level 28,866 Plano residents under age 18 (quickfacts.census.gov)25.9% Children below poverty level (city-data.com)9.3% Est Plano children living AT OR BELOW US poverty level 6,498

12 GAPS IN THE SYSTEM: REAL STORIES – REAL LIVES 12 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SHELTERS – do not allow teen sons of victims, who are themselves victims most likely to repeat cycle Meet Mary and her sons Thomas & James (not their real names) Mary fled a situation of severe domestic violence leaving everything but her sons. Because her sons are > 13, NO shelter, including domestic violence shelters, would take them. With the help of a Good Samaritan, Mary moved into a 1 bdr apt in West Plano so her sons could continue in quality schools. Their response to the violence, move, loss of friends and new poverty Thomas ended up in Juvenile Detention. No job, no money, no food…and soon no shelter led her to seek help from a church. Through the collaborative efforts of several organizations, Mary was trained as a Certified Nurse Assistant, her sons received mentoring and counseling, Thomas finished high school and hopes for college. Community collaboration provided 1 st steps to hope.

13 GAPS IN THE SYSTEM: REAL STORIES – REAL LIVES 13 UNACCOMPANIED YOUTH hundreds in crisis eminently homeless and vulnerable Meet Karen, 19, who is guardian of her 17 year old brother Casey (not their real names) DETERMINATION: a mother on probation, a father in jail and a 17 year old brother to care for and keep out of Juvenile Detention do not stop Karen from pursuing her dream of college. The Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) helps, but does not solve problems of bed bug infestation and flooding. Both youth work & go to school, Karen to Collin College and Casey to Plano East, but minimum wage is not enough for them to live on. Plano churches are collaborating to fund 2 weeks in an extended stay hotel… but what next? There are NO apartments in Plano they can afford even with a HCV.

14 Children & Youth Suffer the Most Collin County Youth > ½ of total – Plano is largest city in county 2012 beyond abc; assessing Children’s Healthi n the North Texas Corridor. Published by Children’s Medical Center Dallas

15 Challenges for Children in Collin County In 2010 over 8,000 families were living in poverty., up 166% over 2000 In ,176 children lived in single-parent families, up 87% over US poverty level for family of 4 = $23,050 Children Suffer the Most “Low income children and youth… are disproportionately affected by mental health challenges. Premature Births of 11.8% in 2010 is 62% higher than 2002 & higher than March of Dimes 2020 goal of 9.6% 2010 teen pregnancy rate of 7% is among worst in the U.S. 7.7% of children live in families with income below federal poverty levels In 2010, 40,130 children in Collin County lived in food insecure households 39,595 children eligible for school meals in 2012 up 211% over 2002 In 2010, 1,971 children were homeless, up 113% since % or 25k children don’t have health insurance beyond abc; assessing Children’s Health in the North Texas Corridor. Published by Children’s Medical Center Dallas

16 16 Increase in Children’s Health Services Children enrolled in CHIP* 2002 – 4, – 10, – 564 Mental Health & 94 Substance abuse – 1,085 Mental Health & 235 Substance Abuse 10% or 25k children don’t have health insurance. 11,422 children received services through WIC (2010) 69% increase in pediatric Medicaid enrollment from 2008 to % of Texas infant deliveries are paid by Medicaid Children enrolled in Medicaid 2002 – 7, – 31, beyond abc; assessing Children’s Health in the North Texas Corridor. Published by Children’s Medical Center Dallas

17 GAPS IN THE SYSTEM WILL ONLY GET WORSE 17 NO EMERGENCY SHELTER in Collin County, INCLUDING PLANO ALL TRANSITIONAL SHELTER PERPETUALLY AT CAPACITY leaving thousands in crisis and eminently homeless each year NO AFFORDABLE HOUSING in Plano and critically inadequate supply county wide. Collin County had 1,585 low rent and Section 8 housing units for its 60,337 residents living in poverty in 2010.

18 GAPS IN THE SYSTEM WILL ONLY GET WORSE 18 NO PLACE FOR CHILDREN to stay beyond 30 days and only 12 beds in Plano available for unaccompanied youth NO COORDINATED INTAKE SYSTEM among agencies serving homeless. Navigating a complicated and critically under resourced homeless resources while in crisis adds to stress and critically adversely impacts effected children & youth NO COUNTY HOSPITAL – 25 % of Texans are uninsured; Minimal access to affordable healthcare for children and adults NO CONTINUUM OF CARE PLAN for Plano or county wide

19 Plano’s 5 year Strategic Plan Proposal 19 Given the top needs identified by the special needs population analysis and during the public input process, the city has developed the following priorities for homeless and homeless prevention request over the course of the Consolidated Plan The creation of additional shelter, supportive services, and transitional housing for homeless and under- housed. (High) Housing accessibility modifications for elderly an disabled residents within the City of Plano. ( High) Support to organizations that engage in public services for Plano residents, especially special needs populations, including but not limited to low income elderly, persons with disabilities, persons with HIV/AIDS and at risk youth. (High) The creation of a homeless shelter with supportive services (a campus) and transitional housing was mentioned by the community service providers as a top need. Emergency and /or transitional housing for youth, especially youth ages 18 – 20, along with supportive services. Survey respondents also rated services and facilities for abuse/neglected children a top priority.

20 City of Plano Public Housing Access 20 73% were African American 74% were families with children

21 City of Plano PHA continued 21

22 City of Plano PHA continued The most recent City of Plano 2010 – 2014 Consolidated Plan can be obtained on line at: – Block groups % of population earns low to moderate income (LMI = household earns < 80% of HUD median family income HUD MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME Dallas, TX HUD Metro FMR Area FY MFI Estimate 80% FY MFI Estimate 2008 $ 64,800 $ 51,840

23 City of Plano PHA continued The most recent City of Plano Action Plan can be obtained on line at: – 23 Block groups IN 2012 where Household earns < 80% of HUD median family income HUD MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME Dallas, TX HUD Metro FMR Area FY MFI Estimate 80% FY MFI Estimate 2013 $ 67,400 $ 53,920

24 City of Plano PHA continued The most recent City of Plano 2010 – 2014 Consolidated Plan can be obtained on line at: – 24 Housing Cost and Affordability ACCORDING TO CONSOLIDATED PLAN, PERCENT OF PLANO RESIDENTS WHO WERE (IN 2008): RENTERS (gross median rent $959; income needed to afford median price - $38,360)34% RENTERS who CANNOT afford to rent38% % OF OWNERS WHO CANNOT AFFORD TO OWN (median price of homes, MLS - $210,900; Income needed to afford median price - $60,900)20% % OF RENTORS who CANNOT afford to buy63% 2012 poverty level for family of 4 $23,050

25 25 COLLABORATION FOR SOLUTIONS Faith Based Community to pursue a New Approach to address & prevent homelessness STRATEGY Gather Intelligence and Identify Resources for Current Solution & Opportunity for Prevention EXECUTION Differentiate Our Plan from others & Assess why we will succeed REPORT Coach and Develop Analytics and Progress

26 26 COLLABORATION FOR SOLUTIONS Faith Based Community to pursue a New Approach to address & prevent homelessness STRATEGY Gather Intelligence and Identify Resources for Current Solution & Opportunity for Prevention Study and Understand Past National and Regional commitments to end homelessness. Find past strategies, look at how it was executed and see if we can improve the processes. Thought – Bring together people, churches and strategic leaders to help build a plan. Market Analysis- Identify and share data. Share past thoughts, ideas and how the current planned solution came about.

27 27 COLLABORATION FOR SOLUTIONS Faith Based Community to pursue a New Approach to address & prevent homelessness EXECUTION Differentiate Our Plan from others & Assess why we will succeed Leverage resources through volunteer commitments – Logistics to organize church members for volunteer hours. Local Centralized Support and extended hours- Work with other programs to become a Central Point of Contact to track success and identify opportunities to improve. People, Process & Technology – Come to the congregation with the plan. Introduce opportunities to help. Categorize the areas of need. Begin the processes needed to tackle the issue and improve on the initial process.

28 28 COLLABORATION FOR SOLUTIONS Faith Based Community to pursue a New Approach to address & prevent homelessness REPORT Coach and Develop Analytics and Progress Voice of the Customer- Gather feedback from people we assist and look for ways to reach others and improve our program. Establish management accountability – Ongoing Tracking and Reporting of Results in place via SalesForce.com Performance Analytics: Track the results. Most Cities look at homeless numbers and base results off of that. We will look at actual feedback and have true outcomes to identify from our efforts.

29 What Can Your Faith Community Do? Get started! COMMITPART OF THE SOLUTION COMMIT to Collaborate to be PART OF THE SOLUTION SEND SEND delegates to Faith Community Connection RAISE FUNDS TO ADDRESS THE TOP 5 NEEDS RAISE FUNDS TO ADDRESS THE TOP 5 NEEDS of 2012 homeless: food, shelter, health & dental services, bus passes and gas cards PROVIDE PROVIDE meals, toiletries & laundry quarters & soap for those in Emergency Shelter HOST A HOMELESS AWARENESS LUNCH & LEARN HOST A HOMELESS AWARENESS LUNCH & LEARN at your faith community or interest groups Host a “Hygiene Kit Party” to put together the essential toiletry needs for families and individuals in crisis WRITE CARDS WRITE CARDS of encouragement for families and individuals in crisis PRAY … for guidance, support, resources & community STEP 1 – EMBRACE THE RESPONSIBILITY!

30 What Can Your Faith Community Do? Get involved! Serve with & support agencies that provide SHELTER & TRANSFORMATIONAL SUPPORT the Samaritan Inn Emily’s Place (formerly Providence House) CITY House & My Friend’s House Family Promise FOOD PANTRIES Serve with & support FOOD PANTRIES, especially those with high volume and low resources TRANSFORMATIONAL PROGRAMS Serve with and support TRANSFORMATIONAL PROGRAMS such as training, tutoring, budgeting HOST FACILITY Become a HOST FACILITY for Family Promise 3 X 4 SHELTER PLAN Participate in the 3 X 4 SHELTER PLAN BUILD INVENTORY OF SHELTER Help BUILD a connected INVENTORY OF SHELTER resources for Plano STEP 2 – SHOW UP!

31 What Can Your Faith Community Do? Faith Collaboration Connection Services CRITICAL EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS CRITICAL – Create & facilitate EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS to transform homelessness to self- sufficiency, with a high emphasis on prevention (prevention costs less than rehabilitation). Advocate policy change to address current homeless problem and initiate prevention action Close the gap between cost of housing and available household income for shelter Support Plano Housing Authority to increase and maintain access to safe affordable housing Collaborate with City of Plano to assist in the timely and effective accomplishment of its 5 year plans for addressing homelessness Address homelessness with your voice during voting season.. STEP 3 – COLLABORATE!

32 What Can Your Faith Community Do? Stay Connected Help develop and maintain a Faith Collaboration Connection communication network including web site, newsletter, awareness events, life skills training programs & sharing of resources & needs. Monitor web site & meet specific needs of collaborative agencies Share the progress with your faith community Raise awareness through articles and speakers in community connections and organizations Invite others to get involved STEP 4 – COMMUNICATE!

33 TAKE THE FIRST STEP! What Can Your Faith Community Do? TAKE THE FIRST STEP! “ We cannot do great things on this Earth, only small things with great love.” Mother Theresa “Poverty is the worst form of violence.” Mahatma Gandhi “Be the change you want to see in the world.” Mahatma Gandhi “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever does.” Margaret Mead “The solution to adult problems tomorrow depends on large measure upon how our children grow up today.” Margaret Mead “ What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail? ” Robert Schuller A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. Lao-tzu “ With God all things are possible.” Jesus “Up to this point the Lord has helped us.” Samuel’s Ebenezer, 1 Sam. 7:21


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