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ReimagineRethinkRemixShare Integrating Scratch Programming as a Tool for Assessment in K-12 Curriculum Integrating Scratch Programming as a Tool for Assessment.

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Presentation on theme: "ReimagineRethinkRemixShare Integrating Scratch Programming as a Tool for Assessment in K-12 Curriculum Integrating Scratch Programming as a Tool for Assessment."— Presentation transcript:

1 ReimagineRethinkRemixShare Integrating Scratch Programming as a Tool for Assessment in K-12 Curriculum Integrating Scratch Programming as a Tool for Assessment in K-12 Curriculum Presented by Leslie Daniels & Dr. Bobby Jeanpierre

2 Needs Analysis Declining interest in the field of computer science – Drop of 60% in enrollment between – Compounded by attrition rates 35 – 50% Needs Analysis Declining interest in the field of computer science – Drop of 60% in enrollment between – Compounded by attrition rates 35 – 50% Analysis

3 Needs Analysis Growth of computing and technology fields – In spite of outsourcing, offshoring Educational focus – prepare students for work in a global economy Creativity and innovation key skills for global economy Needs Analysis Growth of computing and technology fields – In spite of outsourcing, offshoring Educational focus – prepare students for work in a global economy Creativity and innovation key skills for global economy

4 Representation of women in field at a historic low – Equity issues – Lack of role models Representation of women in field at a historic low – Equity issues – Lack of role models Analysis

5 Opportunities to test ideas in K-12 curriculum are limited. Constructivism can foster higher order thinking – Creativity and innovation Torrance measure of creativity declining – Effect of focus on assessment Opportunities to test ideas in K-12 curriculum are limited. Constructivism can foster higher order thinking – Creativity and innovation Torrance measure of creativity declining – Effect of focus on assessment Analysis

6 Creativity Crisis – Kyung Hee Kim- College of William & Mary Analyzed 300,000 Torrance scores of children and adults Creativity scores rising until 1990 Since 1990, creativity scores have consistently inched downward – Most serious for children K-6 Creativity Crisis – Kyung Hee Kim- College of William & Mary Analyzed 300,000 Torrance scores of children and adults Creativity scores rising until 1990 Since 1990, creativity scores have consistently inched downward – Most serious for children K-6 Analysis

7 Creativity Crisis – Good news- Creativity can be taught! – Teachers may use Scratch to facilitate students’ imagining, creating, playing, sharing and reflecting Creativity Crisis – Good news- Creativity can be taught! – Teachers may use Scratch to facilitate students’ imagining, creating, playing, sharing and reflecting Analysis

8 Target Audience Math and science teachers – Primarily middle school, some high school – Central Florida school districts – Mix of novice and seasoned teachers – 50% each – 2 MS science teachers – Remaining math teacher – 2 HS – Half teaching out of field Target Audience Math and science teachers – Primarily middle school, some high school – Central Florida school districts – Mix of novice and seasoned teachers – 50% each – 2 MS science teachers – Remaining math teacher – 2 HS – Half teaching out of field Analysis

9 Target Audience Characteristics – 3 white males, 8 white females, 1 black female – 3 students over the age of 40 Most 25 – 35 Target Audience Characteristics – 3 white males, 8 white females, 1 black female – 3 students over the age of 40 Most 25 – 35 Analysis

10 Learning Environment – Conference room – Met once week – 15 weeks 3 hour sessions – Computer Limits Screen resolution – 1024 x 768 (16 bit ) Windows 2000 or higher 6 laptop computers Learning Environment – Conference room – Met once week – 15 weeks 3 hour sessions – Computer Limits Screen resolution – 1024 x 768 (16 bit ) Windows 2000 or higher 6 laptop computers Analysis

11 Goals and Objectives – Teaching with technology opposed to from – Fostering creativity and innovation – Using technology to engage students – Raising awareness of challenges of teaching in an urban context – Expanding perceptions of computing Goals and Objectives – Teaching with technology opposed to from – Fostering creativity and innovation – Using technology to engage students – Raising awareness of challenges of teaching in an urban context – Expanding perceptions of computing Analysis

12 ReimagineRethinkRemixShare Design Creative Thinking Spiral Scratch Programming Inquiry Model

13 Rationale for the use of Scratch – Constructivist learning – Drag and drop design – Collaborative – Support Design

14 Instructional Strategy – Forms of Assessment – Digital storytelling – Animation – Gaming – Simulation – Lab Practicals – Hands on practice – Instructional video Design

15 Course design – Seminar format – Focus on urban science and math teaching – Action research based – Extensive review of literature Learning, teaching, or assessment – New component – infusion of technology Scratch pilot Design

16 ReimagineRethinkRemixShare Development

17 Jing constructed videos – Shared on screencast.com Available anytime, anywhere, at any pace – Handout SIGSCE – Hands on activity Development

18 Course development – Textbook examples – Research literature – Action research template – Pre, mid, post survey assessing comfort level progress – Course assessment choice and flexiblity Development

19 ReimagineRethinkRemixShare Analysis Design Development Implementation

20 Course offered UCF Spring term – Masters level – 3 hour credit – Monday night – 6 PM to 9PM Course offered UCF Spring term – Masters level – 3 hour credit – Monday night – 6 PM to 9PM Implementation

21 Reviewed Jing videos in class – Learnscratch.org – Scratch website – Scratch project library Sharing with peers Hands on 8 block activity Demonstration of Scratchboard Reviewed Jing videos in class – Learnscratch.org – Scratch website – Scratch project library Sharing with peers Hands on 8 block activity Demonstration of Scratchboard Implementation

22 Midterm presentations of use of Scratch – Reflection of personal learning experience and utility with students Final presentations of action research – Choice of Scratch or other technology application Scratch as an assessment tool was infused throughout the course Midterm presentations of use of Scratch – Reflection of personal learning experience and utility with students Final presentations of action research – Choice of Scratch or other technology application Scratch as an assessment tool was infused throughout the course Implementation

23 ReimagineRethinkRemixShare Evaluation

24 Preassessment – Limited to no experience with programming – Creativity mostly defined in relation to choice of processes and products. – Unclear about role teachers play in illuminating opportunities in CS field STEM initiative fails to consider CS Evaluation

25 Midterm survey – Teachers did not appear to be using the videos – Teachers expressed a desire for more hands on guidance – Variance in seeing at this point the value of using Scratch in their curriculum Evaluation

26 Post assessment – All see benefits of infusing technology into the curriculum Identified Scratch to be engaging for students – Time, schedule and lack of confidence in teaching Scratch seen a limiters. (Control issues) Evaluation

27 Post assessment continued – Scratch valued as an assessment tool. – Scratch an excellent tool for fostering creativity – Role in expanding students perceptions of the field of computer science still unrecognized. Evaluation

28 Post assessment continued – Teacher professional development – Suggestion for additional hands on with guidance Evaluation

29 Trends resulting from the use of Scratch – Teacher transformation – Ability of some students to learn – Learning was evidenced in all levels – gifted, regular and special needs. Evaluation

30 Future Applications – Development of Instruction module – Introduction to Scratch Programming ScratchEd – Future research – Examine how secondary math and science teachers integrate Scratch into the curriculum Evaluation

31 References – Aspray, W. Mayadas, F.. And Vardi. M.(2006). Globalization and Offshoring of Software: A Report of the ACM Job Migration Task Force. ACM – Bronson, Po, & Merryman, Ashley. The creativity crisis. Newsweek, July 10, creativity-crisis.html creativity-crisis.html – Denning, P. & McGettrick, A. (2005) Re-center computer science. Communications of the ACM, 48(11), – Fountain, J. (2000) Constructing the information society: women, information technology and design. Technology in Society, 22,

32 contact – Leslie Daniels: – Dr. Bobby Jeanpierre: Albert Einstein said, “Imagination is more important than Knowledge.” We agree!

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