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The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Associate Professor— Why we need post-tenure mentoring Patrick M. Scanlon Professor and Chairman Department of Communication.

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Presentation on theme: "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Associate Professor— Why we need post-tenure mentoring Patrick M. Scanlon Professor and Chairman Department of Communication."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Associate Professor— Why we need post-tenure mentoring Patrick M. Scanlon Professor and Chairman Department of Communication

2 Future events October 22, 2014: Women and Promotion: Challenges and paths forward November 12, 2014: Mid-Career Faculty Planning

3 Today Bad news Job (dis)satisfaction among associates Gender inequities in promotion Good news New paths to promotion Post-tenure mentoring

4 Job (dis)satisfaction among associates

5 COACHE survey of job satisfaction academic year Survey of 13,510 faculty at 69 four-year public and private U.S. colleges and universities

6 COACHE survey of job satisfaction In 25 categories, associate professors were less satisfied, at statistically significant margins, than both assistant and full professors. Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

7 Work related to research Assistant AssociateFull Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

8 Time spent on research Assistant AssociateFull Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

9 Work related to service Assistant AssociateFull Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

10 Equity of committee assignments Assistant AssociateFull Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

11 Time spent on service Assistant AssociateFull Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

12 Appreciation and recognition Assistant AssociateFull Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

13 Salary inequities Salary growth since 2000 adjusted for inflation: Assistant 9% Associate 5.6% Full 11.7% Williams, A. (2014, August 1). Stuck in the middle. The Chronicle of Higher Education.

14 Salary inequities At master's institutions, associate professors’ pay fell by 0.3 percent since , after adjusting for inflation. Williams, A. (2014, August 1). Stuck in the middle. The Chronicle of Higher Education.

15 COACHE survey of job satisfaction Mentoring Assistant AssociateFull Jaschik, S. (2012, June 4). Unhappy associate professors. Inside Higher Education.

16 Gender inequities in promotion

17 Promotion: men vs. women Men hold 75% of full professorships in the U.S. Women are 10% less likely to be promoted to full, after controlling for productivity. Women take on average one to three years longer than men to be promoted. Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1),

18 Promotion: men vs. women Survey of 350 faculty at UMass Amherst Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1),

19 Promotion: men vs. women Associate professors who took on major service commitments: 3/4 of women 1/2 of men Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1),

20 Promotion: men vs. women Associate professors who served as undergraduate directors: 1/3 of women 17% of men Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1), 22-26

21 Promotion: men vs. women Associate professors who served as undergraduate directors: Women took 12 years to be promoted to full. Men took seven. Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1),

22 Promotion: men vs. women Women associate professors report spending “roughly 220 more hours on teaching, mentoring, and service over two semesters than men at that rank.” Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1),

23 Promotion: men vs. women Associate professors time spent on research: Men 37% Women 25% Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1),

24 Promotion: men vs. women Associate professors time spent on service: Men 20% Women 27% Misra, J., Lundquist, J. H., Holmes, E., & Agiomavritis, S. (2011). The ivory ceiling of service work. Academe, 97(1),

25 Promotion: men vs. women MLA survey of associates in English and foreign languages: “… the findings … show consistently longer time to promotion for women than men in every analytic category—single, married, divorced, with children, or without.” Poor, S. S., Scullion, R., et.al. (2009, April 27). Standing still: The associate professor survey: MLA committee on the status of women in the profession, 19.

26 Associates need Reduced service Transparency and clarity of promotion criteria Flexible paths to promotion Career planning/mentoring

27 New paths to promotion

28 One illustration… Flexible Pathway to Full Professor, Ohio State University

29 Gordon Gee, former president OSU Concerning promotion to full professor, there should be “multiple ways to salvation.” Different paths to full professor Inside Higher Education, March 5, 2010

30 Gordon Gee, former president OSU Associates should be able to find “their real callings” and focus on them. Different paths to full professor Inside Higher Education, March 5, 2010

31 The OSU “Flexible Pathway” to Full End dominance of research Promote a balanced portfolio Offer the option to earn promotion based largely on teaching and service Reward impact

32 The OSU “Flexible Pathway” to Full Long-term individualized career planning No “tracking” “Faculty are primarily responsible for the advancement of their own careers” Candidates tell their story

33 Post-tenure mentoring

34

35 Mentoring, traditionally One-to-one Top-down

36 Mentoring, transitionally Networked Multi-level

37 Horizontal Peers Mentoring, transitionally

38 Post-tenure mentoring process 1.Establish goals 2.Clarify promotion criteria 3.Devise a long-term plan 4.Build a mentoring network Based on Buch, K., et. al., Removing the barriers to full professor. Change (2011, November/December),

39 Finally… Let us all seek multiple ways to salvation.


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