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REVIEWING AND PRACTICING CITATIONS AND QUOTING. TERMS YOU SHOULD KNOW: A REVIEW Database: online collection of resources Paraphrase: putting text into.

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Presentation on theme: "REVIEWING AND PRACTICING CITATIONS AND QUOTING. TERMS YOU SHOULD KNOW: A REVIEW Database: online collection of resources Paraphrase: putting text into."— Presentation transcript:

1 REVIEWING AND PRACTICING CITATIONS AND QUOTING

2 TERMS YOU SHOULD KNOW: A REVIEW Database: online collection of resources Paraphrase: putting text into your own words Source: a place from which info can be obtained Citation: giving credit to your source (formula) Works cited: the page that lists all your citations Abstract: Summary paragraph on an article/ source Annotation Paragraph: summary and evaluative paragraph on your article/ source Annotated Bibliography: the annotation paragraph plus the citation

3 HOW TO GIVE CREDIT, CITE THE SOURCE: Take a look at the “How to cite sources” page of your packet Flip through and make some observations about how full citations look in MLA format Let’s look together at a website that can do these citations for you: Many databases that you’ll use to find your articles for this unit will actually GIVE you the full MLA citation at the end of the article, so be on the lookout for that – saves you lots of work!

4 MOVING ON: QUOTING When you write a paper, often times you will have to include quotes from your sources to help back up the arguments you are making. Each quote you use MUST include the following: Lead in to the quote (3 kinds) Quotation marks around the quote In-text citation after the quote (author’s name and page #) Period after the citation

5 LEADING IN TO YOUR QUOTES: THERE ARE 3 KINDS OF LEAD INS: SAID, SENTENCE, AND BLENDED 1.The said lead in (easiest and most popular). Begin quote with “He said, or some variation of that Example: Bella was shocked when Edward said to her, “And so the lion fell in love with the lamb…” (Meyer 274).

6 THE SENTENCE LEAD IN 2.The sentence lead in (easy, but not used very often for some reason). Write a complete sentence, but follow with a colon and the quote that supports your idea after the colon. Example: Edward feels that he will harm Bella, so he tries not to fall in love with her but fails: “And so the lion fell in love with the lamb…” (Meyer 274).

7 THE BLENDED LEAD IN 3.The blended lead in (the most challenging and usually only requires snippets of quotes, not whole quotes). The quote needs to blend in with your sentence, making it seem like the words are yours. Example: When the “lion fell in love with the lamb,” the tone of the entire book changed from mysterious to romantic (Meyer 274).

8 NOW YOU TRY: Find ONE important line from each of your articles. On a sheet of paper, practice a different kind of lead-in for each quotation. Keep this sheet, and incorporate these into your annotation paragraphs tomorrow and Friday.

9 MLA HEADINGS Remember: Yellow Turkeys Can’t Dance Your Name Teacher Name Class Date Remember: Double-Spaced, Top Left John Lampley Mrs. Minich 9 th Literature/ Composition October 9, 2013

10 PRIMARY SOURCES Primary Source = a document or physical object which was written or created during the time under study. These sources were present during an experience or time period and offer an inside view of a particular event. Some types of primary sources include: ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS (excerpts or translations acceptable): Diaries, speeches, manuscripts, letters, interviews, news film footage, autobiographies, official records

11 SECONDARY SOURCE Secondary Source = interprets and analyzes primary sources. These sources are one or more steps removed from the event. Secondary sources may have pictures, quotes or graphics of primary sources in them. Some types of secondary sources include: PUBLICATIONS: Textbooks, magazine articles, histories, criticisms, commentaries, encyclopedias, a journal/magazine article which interprets or reviews previous findings, a history textbook, a book about the effects of WWI

12 WHAT IS A CREDIBLE SOURCE? Credible Source = Ask the following questions Who is the author? Credible sources are written by authors respected in their fields of study How recent is the source? What is the author's purpose? When deciding which sources to use, you should take the purpose or point of view of the author into consideration Be especially careful when evaluating Internet sources! Never use Web sites where an author cannot be determined, unless the site is associated with a reputable institution such as a respected university, a credible media outlet, government program or department, or well-known non-governmental organizations.


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