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I NCORPORATING Q UOTATIONS II This quick PowerPoint focuses on the various ways to introduce your sources/ direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries,

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Presentation on theme: "I NCORPORATING Q UOTATIONS II This quick PowerPoint focuses on the various ways to introduce your sources/ direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries,"— Presentation transcript:

1 I NCORPORATING Q UOTATIONS II This quick PowerPoint focuses on the various ways to introduce your sources/ direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, an important element to integrating/incorporating quotes smoothly throughout your research paper.

2 B ODY P ARAGRAPH C HECKLIST :  This should be a Microsoft Word Document  Font: 12pt Times New Roman (Always ask your professor for his or her preferred font)  Spacing: Double  Are your sources credible?  Do you have a clear topic sentence?  After your topic sentence, do you clearly state your main point or claim?  Does your claim support your topic sentence or thesis?  Does your evidence support your claim, topic sentence, and thesis statement?  Have you properly incorporated/integrated your direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary?  After your evidence, did you provide a sentence or so explaining, in your own words, what the evidence means, so your reader can understand it within the context of your paper?  Did you check your MLA Formatting?  Still need help? Follow Along!

3 W HY IS IT IMPORTANT TO SMOOTHLY INTRODUCE / INCORPORATE / INTEGRATE QUOTATIONS, PARAPHRASES, OR SUMMARIES ? It establishes your credibility as a writer. It allows the reader to know that you are using someone else’s words by giving credit to them. It is a smooth way to transition or introduce a source’s ideas that you have borrowed. Avoids plagiarism It is a great way to allow your paper, especially your body paragraphs, to flow smoothly, making it easier to read. By using various signal words, listed on the next slide, it helps vary your sentences throughout your paper. What are some ways we can do this? Signal Words!

4 S IGNAL W ORDS : HELP VARY YOUR SENTENCES WHEN INTRODUCING / INCORPORATING / INTEGRATING QUOTATIONS AND INDICATE WHOM YOU ARE QUOTING :  Acknowledges  Adds  Admits  Argues  Asks  Asserts  Charges  Claims  Clarifies  Comments  Complains  Concedes  Concludes  Considers  Contends  Denies  Describes  Emphasizes  Explains  Expresses  Finds  Holds  Implies  Insists  Interprets  Maintains  Notes  Observes  Points Out  Proposes  Proves  Refutes  Remarks  Reports  Responds  Shows  Speculates  States  Suggests  Warns

5 E XAMPLES U SING S IGNAL P HRASES AND D IRECT Q UOTATIONS WITH E XPLANATIONS : When you mention a source for the first time in a paper, it’s important to clarify for the reader who that person, but it is also equally as important to reiterate who is speaking throughout your paper. Here’s how: Example: As the world-famous scholar X explains it, “________.” Explanation: By using the words, “the world-famous scholar,” and adding a specific name that briefly explains who the person speaking is, this avoids plagiarism while adding credibility to your work. By using the signal word, “explains it,” in your introduction, it gives credit to the person speaking.

6 M ORE E XAMPLES … Let’s get more specific… Example: As Morgenstern remarks, “Joe Glaser…proved to be the right man right man at the right time” (128). Why can’t we just place the quote, “Joe Glaser…proved to be the right man at the right time” (128), right into the body paragraph? Explanation: We cannot just place a quote into a sentence and treat it as its own separate sentence. Why? It cannot stand alone because the quote will not be properly integrated and simply just plopped within the text without a given purpose to the reader as to why you are using it. It also can get lost within your body paragraph and lose its meaning. Furthermore, you could run into possibly plagiarizing by not letting the reader know who said the quote. We are not signaling to the reader that we are about to present them with specific evidence that supports a specific point we made in our paper. For this example, notice, the key words here are “Morgenstern remarks.” By mentioning the author’s name and the signal word, “remarks,” it not only gives credit to that person, but it introduces the quote, allowing it to be smoothly integrated. Here, we do have a parenthetical citation in MLA Format with only the page number because the author’s name is already mentioned. We also have quotation marks because this is a direct quotation.

7 Don’t forget to clarify, in your own words, in a sentence or so after the quote, what the quote means. This is important because it allows your reader to understand what your interpretation of the quote is within the context of your paper, and how the quote supports your claim, and above all else, your thesis statement. Example of How to Start a Sentence that will Clarify the Meaning of the Quote: Example: The basis of X’s argument is that ___________. Is what? Explain for the reader, in your own words, what your interpretation of the quote you chose is. What is the author trying to say? How does it support your claim and your thesis statement?

8 E XAMPLE OF H OW TO P ARAPHRASE A Q UOTE : Example of a Paraphrasing a Quotation: Example: As Bergreen points out, Armstrong easily reached difficult high notes, the F’s and G’s that stymied other trumpeters (248). Explanation: Notice how there are no quotation marks around this phrase because it is not a direct quotation, rather, a paraphrase. The author’s name, “Bergreen,” is mentioned for credit, and the signal phrase, “points out,” also identifies Bergreen as the source of the paraphrased information about his opinion on Louis Armstrong’s techniques. The parenthetical citation used indicates the page number of the text in MLA Format.

9 G OOD L UCK ! For more information and more examples on Incorporating Quotations, stop by the CSSC on the Winter Park Campus in Room 136. The information in this tip sheet can be credited to authors, Maimon, Peritz, and Yancey, of The Brief McGrawl-Hill Handbook and The Purdue Online Writing Lab at


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