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Completing the World History CBA Shorecrest Spring 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Completing the World History CBA Shorecrest Spring 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Completing the World History CBA Shorecrest Spring 2013

2 What is going on in this photo? What questions does it raise?

3 What is a Primary Source?  Autobiographies  Diaries  Documents  Eyewitness accounts  Film footage  Laws  Letters  Newspaper articles  Autobiographies  Diaries  Documents  Eyewitness accounts  Film footage  Laws  Letters  Newspaper articles  Objects (artifacts) from the time  Oral histories  Photographs  Poems, art, music  Speeches  Objects (artifacts) from the time  Oral histories  Photographs  Poems, art, music  Speeches An informational source from the time of the event

4 Why do we use primary sources in history?  Information is as close to its source as we can get  No other person has interpreted it for us  Only your interpretation  Can give vital additional information  Social and cultural mores  Language development  Printing methods  Technologies (such as cameras, tools, implements of a trade)  Information is as close to its source as we can get  No other person has interpreted it for us  Only your interpretation  Can give vital additional information  Social and cultural mores  Language development  Printing methods  Technologies (such as cameras, tools, implements of a trade)

5 Does a Primary Source have to be the original material? No – it can be in another form, but it can’t be edited or interpreted in any way.

6 Questions to ask yourself when looking at Primary Sources  Who created (wrote, owned) this?  How do they know the information they are telling me?  When was it created?  Why was it created?  Who was it created for?  Who created (wrote, owned) this?  How do they know the information they are telling me?  When was it created?  Why was it created?  Who was it created for?

7 What are Secondary Sources? An informational source that analyzes the event. These sources often use primary sources to compile the information. Examples:  Biographies  Encyclopedias  History books  Textbooks An informational source that analyzes the event. These sources often use primary sources to compile the information. Examples:  Biographies  Encyclopedias  History books  Textbooks

8 Are Secondary Sources useful the CBA? Yes – They provide the necessary background or context to be able to interpret Primary Sources For example, your World History textbook can provide background information about the events leading up to Revolutionary War. Yes – They provide the necessary background or context to be able to interpret Primary Sources For example, your World History textbook can provide background information about the events leading up to Revolutionary War.

9 Beware of Bias! Is it possible for a Secondary Source to be completely objective?

10 Where can I find Primary and Secondary Sources? Library books (‘Find a SC’) Subject or Keyword Databases at Shorecrest Nettrekker Elibrary ProQuest World History ABC-CLIO Databases at KCLS Look under Primary Sources databases Library books (‘Find a SC’) Subject or Keyword Databases at Shorecrest Nettrekker Elibrary ProQuest World History ABC-CLIO Databases at KCLS Look under Primary Sources databases

11 Where can I find Primary and Secondary Sources? Student Links on SC library page Primary sources Search Engines Use your favorite (Google, Bing, Yahoo!) but use it wisely

12 “Works Cited” vs Bibliography  Bibliography is an ordered list of print resources used for background research  “Works Cited” is an ordered list of resources that exist in a variety of formats (book, website, database article, personal interview, video, etc)  Choose the heading that fits your research and center it as a title on your citation page  Bibliography is an ordered list of print resources used for background research  “Works Cited” is an ordered list of resources that exist in a variety of formats (book, website, database article, personal interview, video, etc)  Choose the heading that fits your research and center it as a title on your citation page

13 Formatting Styles  MLA (Modern Language Association) humanities (esp., literature)  APA (American Psychological Association) social & behavioral sciences  Chicago  Turabian  MLA (Modern Language Association) humanities (esp., literature)  APA (American Psychological Association) social & behavioral sciences  Chicago  Turabian

14 Citations  Use MLA style for creating your citations  See SC Library page links:  Purdue’s OWL  EasyBib.com  Use MLA style for creating your citations  See SC Library page links:  Purdue’s OWL  EasyBib.com

15 Tips on Citing  You are responsible for identifying the necessary elements to include in the citation  Cite the resource that you are actually using  Always use the latest date or year available  Select the most obvious city, if there is more than one  Check your spelling! Use Spellcheck!  Don’t just shrug off stuff you can’t find (e.g., an author or posting date)  You are responsible for identifying the necessary elements to include in the citation  Cite the resource that you are actually using  Always use the latest date or year available  Select the most obvious city, if there is more than one  Check your spelling! Use Spellcheck!  Don’t just shrug off stuff you can’t find (e.g., an author or posting date)

16 Arranging Works Cited  Always alphabetize by author’s last name or 1st significant word in the title  Align the start of each entry with the left margin of your page  Indent each subsequent line 5 spaces  Double space the entire document (don’t double double space between entries)  Unless directed to do otherwise, don’t separate by resource type (online and print)  Always alphabetize by author’s last name or 1st significant word in the title  Align the start of each entry with the left margin of your page  Indent each subsequent line 5 spaces  Double space the entire document (don’t double double space between entries)  Unless directed to do otherwise, don’t separate by resource type (online and print)

17 Book Example Kornberg, Arthur. For the Love of Enzymes: the odyssey of a biochemist. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, Stanley, Wendell and Evans Valens. Viruses and the Nature of Life. New York: E.P.Dutton & Co., Inc., 1961.

18 eBook example Solis, Java, MS. "Gene Pool." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Vol. 1. 2nd ed. Detroit: Gale, vols. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Gale. Shorecrest High School. 8 Apr. 2009

19 Website example “Genetic Disorders.” Medline Plus. National Institute of Health. 25 March Web. 8 April 2009

20 In-text Citing  Also known as “parenthetical notation”  Makes specific reference to a resource within your essay  Gives brief but immediate credit to the source  Full citation of the source is provided in the Works Cited document  Also known as “parenthetical notation”  Makes specific reference to a resource within your essay  Gives brief but immediate credit to the source  Full citation of the source is provided in the Works Cited document

21 2 Ways to Cite In-text  Parenthetical: Author’s last name or title’s first word and page in parentheses at end of the sentence or paragraph referring to the specific information  Narrative: Author’s last name or title’s first word mentioned in the narrative of your paragraph and followed by specific page(s) reference  Parenthetical: Author’s last name or title’s first word and page in parentheses at end of the sentence or paragraph referring to the specific information  Narrative: Author’s last name or title’s first word mentioned in the narrative of your paragraph and followed by specific page(s) reference

22 Parenthetical Example Often a virus is so small (“a contagious, living fluid”) that it cannot be detected through normal microscopes and thus, the spread of infection goes undetected until the disease is out of control (Ryan, 50).

23 Narrative example In his discussion of viruses, Ryan notes that often a virus is so small that it cannot be detected through normal microscopes and thus, the spread of infection goes undetected until the disease is out of control (50).

24 Example of paraphrased information with correct parenthetical notation from a book: In his discussion of viruses, Ryan notes that often a virus is so small that it cannot be detected through normal microscopes and thus, the spread of infection goes undetected until the disease is out of control (50). Correct citation format for the above resource: Ryan, Frank, MD. Virus X: tracking the new killer plagues. Boston: Little Brown and Co., Putting it all together

25 Annotations An annotation is a brief summary of the content of the resource and its value to the researcher. Keep your annotations to 3 sentences: 1 sentence summarizing the content, 1 sentence evaluating the content, and 1 sentence specifically telling what you found useful. (If you must include more information, no more than 5 sentences total!)

26 Tips on Annotations  Be specific on the resource’s value  Keep the summaries short and concise  Begin the annotation immediately following the citation  Double-space the annotation  Use the resource before you write the annotation  Be specific on the resource’s value  Keep the summaries short and concise  Begin the annotation immediately following the citation  Double-space the annotation  Use the resource before you write the annotation

27 Annotation example Auchincloss, Louis. Pioneers & Caretakers: a study of 9 American women novelists. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, These essays outline influences and themes within the writers’ works. Auchincloss has thoroughly researched his subjects and writes insightful essays showing how life affects art. The discussion of Willa Cather’s use of memory and experience in crafting fiction supports my comments on My Antonia.


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