Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

MLA Format Guide: Quick, picker-upper review!. A brief checklist: Have you * Used standard, white 8.5 by 11-inch paper? * Double-spaced and used an acceptable.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "MLA Format Guide: Quick, picker-upper review!. A brief checklist: Have you * Used standard, white 8.5 by 11-inch paper? * Double-spaced and used an acceptable."— Presentation transcript:

1 MLA Format Guide: Quick, picker-upper review!

2 A brief checklist: Have you * Used standard, white 8.5 by 11-inch paper? * Double-spaced and used an acceptable font? * Created a header, numbering the pages consecutively? * Italicized the titles of longer works? * Reviewed your instructor’s formatting directions???

3 Okay, enough with the preface! * Differing from other essays, a research paper requires you to, of course, research and cite sources. So let’s start with MLA in-text citations…

4 * Parenthetical citations: If you don’t mention the writer’s name in your sentence, at the end, place the author’s name and the source’s page number inside parentheses (Dupré 1). * When you mention the author’s name in the sentence, then place only the relevant page number(s) in parentheses.

5 Examples: 1.) Zeus, that codger, “bemoaned his aching back” (Homer 89). 2.) In his autobiography, Melville writes that his “favorite hue is a gentle, undulant rouge” (45). 3.) If the work has no author, then substitute the source’s shortened title for the anonymous author.

6 Irregular Citations: A Brief and Close Look * Authors with same last name? Use first letter of first name to distinguish: (A. Goody 159) (B. Goody 157) * Multiple works by same author? Include shortened title in citation (Miller, Cancer 469). * Indirect source -- you quote the author quoting someone else -- then follow this format example: (qtd. in Comeaux 259). * Authors with same last name? Use first letter of first name to distinguish: (A. Goody 159) (B. Goody 157) * Multiple works by same author? Include shortened title in citation (Miller, Cancer 469). * Indirect source -- you quote the author quoting someone else -- then follow this format example: (qtd. in Comeaux 259).

7 Formatting Quotations! * P eriods, commas, and semicolons should appear after the parenthetical citation. * Question marks and exclamation points?! Inside the quotation marks if part of passage, but outside parenthetical citation if part of your text. * Mark breaks in short quotations of verse with a slash, /, at the end of each line of verse: * Cullen concludes, "Of all the things that happened there / That's all I remember" (11-12). * P eriods, commas, and semicolons should appear after the parenthetical citation. * Question marks and exclamation points?! Inside the quotation marks if part of passage, but outside parenthetical citation if part of your text. * Mark breaks in short quotations of verse with a slash, /, at the end of each line of verse: * Cullen concludes, "Of all the things that happened there / That's all I remember" (11-12).

8 Loooooong Quotations? * Quotation longer than four typed lines? Block it as such: Begin the block quotation on a new line, indenting one inch. The parenthetical citation follows the quotation, and you should omit the quotation marks. (Boo 2) * Quotation longer than four typed lines? Block it as such: Begin the block quotation on a new line, indenting one inch. The parenthetical citation follows the quotation, and you should omit the quotation marks. (Boo 2)

9 Say What? * Need to omit or add word(s)? Then use brackets to indicate textual additions: According to Robertson, “Dr. Wily [who is actually a robot] is up to no good” (23). * If omitting words, then use ellipses: The dubious character explained “the reason we wear these bandanas is because […] we are zombies” (Bradstreet 90). * Need to omit or add word(s)? Then use brackets to indicate textual additions: According to Robertson, “Dr. Wily [who is actually a robot] is up to no good” (23). * If omitting words, then use ellipses: The dubious character explained “the reason we wear these bandanas is because […] we are zombies” (Bradstreet 90).

10 Excited about Works Cited! Excited about Works Cited! * Your in-text citations refer readers to the Works Cited page, usually last in your manuscript, and give a source’s information. * Since you can research many resources, MLA thus provides various types of citations. * Your in-text citations refer readers to the Works Cited page, usually last in your manuscript, and give a source’s information. * Since you can research many resources, MLA thus provides various types of citations.

11 Quick reminders: * Refer to instructor’s formatting directions for the Works Cited page! * Alphabetize your entries! * Capitalize each word in the titles of articles, books, etc, but do not capitalize articles, short prepositions, or conjunctions unless one is the first word of the title or subtitle: The Complete History of a Paperclip, Why Dinosaurs and Ninjas Are Awesome, There’s No Preposition I’d End a Sentence With. * Use italics for longer works, like books, but quotation marks for shorter ones, such as poems. * After the first line, indent all other lines of the citation. * Refer to instructor’s formatting directions for the Works Cited page! * Alphabetize your entries! * Capitalize each word in the titles of articles, books, etc, but do not capitalize articles, short prepositions, or conjunctions unless one is the first word of the title or subtitle: The Complete History of a Paperclip, Why Dinosaurs and Ninjas Are Awesome, There’s No Preposition I’d End a Sentence With. * Use italics for longer works, like books, but quotation marks for shorter ones, such as poems. * After the first line, indent all other lines of the citation.

12 Books: * One author? Then use this example: Last name, First name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. * More than one author? Rodrigue, John, and Nick Comeaux. Poetic Geriatrics. New Orleans: Red Herring, 2007. * If more than three authors, after listing the first author, you may type “ et al, ” indicating other unmentioned authors. Coyne, Amanda, et al. * Two or more books by the same author? Write one regular entry, and for the additional ones, substitute “---” for the author’s name. List the author’s books alphabetically by title under his or her named entry. * One author? Then use this example: Last name, First name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. * More than one author? Rodrigue, John, and Nick Comeaux. Poetic Geriatrics. New Orleans: Red Herring, 2007. * If more than three authors, after listing the first author, you may type “ et al, ” indicating other unmentioned authors. Coyne, Amanda, et al. * Two or more books by the same author? Write one regular entry, and for the additional ones, substitute “---” for the author’s name. List the author’s books alphabetically by title under his or her named entry.

13 Books: * Corporate author? Italian-American Association. “The History of Jutz’s Café.” Thibodaux: Random, 2009. * No author at all? List work alphabetically by title, and follow this example: Encyclopedia of Indiana. New York: Somerset, 1993. Translated book? Derrida, Jacques. Sovereignties in Question. Trans. Lindon Stall. Opelousas: Ditto Press, 2004. * Republished book? Insert the original publication date before the newer one: Falgoust, Kristina. On Blinking. 1981. Vacherie: Coin Books, 2002. * Corporate author? Italian-American Association. “The History of Jutz’s Café.” Thibodaux: Random, 2009. * No author at all? List work alphabetically by title, and follow this example: Encyclopedia of Indiana. New York: Somerset, 1993. Translated book? Derrida, Jacques. Sovereignties in Question. Trans. Lindon Stall. Opelousas: Ditto Press, 2004. * Republished book? Insert the original publication date before the newer one: Falgoust, Kristina. On Blinking. 1981. Vacherie: Coin Books, 2002.

14 Books: * Anthology or collection? List by editor. Melvin, Clay, ed. The Harrowing Lyrics of Early Dylan. New York: Viking Press, 2004. * If you have multiple editors, then use “eds.” * Work in an anthology of collection? Lastname, Firstname. “ Title of Work. ” Title of Anthology. Ed. Editor ’ s Name(s). Place of Publication: Publisher, Year. Pages. * Anthology or collection? List by editor. Melvin, Clay, ed. The Harrowing Lyrics of Early Dylan. New York: Viking Press, 2004. * If you have multiple editors, then use “eds.” * Work in an anthology of collection? Lastname, Firstname. “ Title of Work. ” Title of Anthology. Ed. Editor ’ s Name(s). Place of Publication: Publisher, Year. Pages.

15 Periodicals: * Article in a magazine? Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Periodical. Day Month Year: pages. * Article in a newspaper? Cheramie, Janie. “Sudden Beaver Attack, Mayor Rothbard blames Wikipedia.” The New York Times. 23 June 2004: 10. * Article in a Scholarly Journal? Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Journal Volume. Issue (Year): pages. * Journal with continuous pagination? Allen, Emily. "Staging Identity: Frances Burney's Allegory of Genre." Eighteenth-Century Studies 31 (1998): 433-51. Non-continuous pagination? Then you must include the issue. * Article in a magazine? Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Periodical. Day Month Year: pages. * Article in a newspaper? Cheramie, Janie. “Sudden Beaver Attack, Mayor Rothbard blames Wikipedia.” The New York Times. 23 June 2004: 10. * Article in a Scholarly Journal? Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Journal Volume. Issue (Year): pages. * Journal with continuous pagination? Allen, Emily. "Staging Identity: Frances Burney's Allegory of Genre." Eighteenth-Century Studies 31 (1998): 433-51. Non-continuous pagination? Then you must include the issue.

16 Electronic Sources: Find these common features before you cite a web page: * Author and/or editor names * Name of database & title of project, book, or article * Any available version numbers * Date of version, revision, or posting * Publisher information * Date you accessed the material * Electronic address, printed between the carets ([ ]) Find these common features before you cite a web page: * Author and/or editor names * Name of database & title of project, book, or article * Any available version numbers * Date of version, revision, or posting * Publisher information * Date you accessed the material * Electronic address, printed between the carets ([ ])

17 Electronic Sources: * An entire website? Name of Site. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (often found in copyright statements). Date you accessed the site. [electronic address]. * The Purdue OWL Family of Sites. 26 Aug. 2005. The Writing Lab and OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. 23 April 2006. * An entire website? Name of Site. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (often found in copyright statements). Date you accessed the site. [electronic address]. * The Purdue OWL Family of Sites. 26 Aug. 2005. The Writing Lab and OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. 23 April 2006.

18 Electronic Sources: * A page on a site? ”Boudreaux’s Paste.” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 28 April 2006. 10 May 2006. * Short work from site? Heidegger, Martin. “Let’s Get Metaphysical.” Anthology of Stuff. London: A. Bell, 1996. Online Cool Stuff. 17 May 2000. University of Importance. 09 November 2007. * A page on a site? ”Boudreaux’s Paste.” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 28 April 2006. 10 May 2006. * Short work from site? Heidegger, Martin. “Let’s Get Metaphysical.” Anthology of Stuff. London: A. Bell, 1996. Online Cool Stuff. 17 May 2000. University of Importance. 09 November 2007.

19 More Electronic Sources / An article in a web magazine? Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Online Publication. Date of Publication. Date of Access. / An article in an online scholarly journal? Wheelis, Mark. "Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention." Emerging Infectious Diseases 6.6 (2000): 33 pars. 8 May 2006.

20 One More Electronic Source, I Promise: * Article from an electronic subscription service? Grabe, Mark. "Voluntary Use of Online Lecture Notes: Correlates of Note Use and Note Use as an Alternative to Class Attendance." Computers and Education 44 (2005): 409-21. Science Watch. ScienceDirect. Nicholls, Thibodaux, Ellender Lib. 28 May 2006. * Article from an electronic subscription service? Grabe, Mark. "Voluntary Use of Online Lecture Notes: Correlates of Note Use and Note Use as an Alternative to Class Attendance." Computers and Education 44 (2005): 409-21. Science Watch. ScienceDirect. Nicholls, Thibodaux, Ellender Lib. 28 May 2006.

21 And there you have it! Oh, one more thing. Here’s the citation for this presentation: The Purdue OWL Family of Sites. 26 Aug. 2005. The Writing Lab and OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. 23 April 2006. Oh, one more thing. Here’s the citation for this presentation: The Purdue OWL Family of Sites. 26 Aug. 2005. The Writing Lab and OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. 23 April 2006.


Download ppt "MLA Format Guide: Quick, picker-upper review!. A brief checklist: Have you * Used standard, white 8.5 by 11-inch paper? * Double-spaced and used an acceptable."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google