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Extended Metaphor. Extended Metaphor Defined  An extended metaphor is a metaphor that has many parts and may be several sentences long.  A regular metaphor.

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Presentation on theme: "Extended Metaphor. Extended Metaphor Defined  An extended metaphor is a metaphor that has many parts and may be several sentences long.  A regular metaphor."— Presentation transcript:

1 Extended Metaphor

2 Extended Metaphor Defined  An extended metaphor is a metaphor that has many parts and may be several sentences long.  A regular metaphor exists as a simple, direct comparison between two objects.  An extended metaphor is a layered, multifaceted comparison.

3 Extended Metaphor: Purpose  Authors create extended metaphors to communicate a detailed comparison of two objects.  An extended metaphor allows the author to highlight for the audience the multiple commonalities between the two objects.

4 Metaphor vs. Extended Metaphor Metaphor: She is a rose. Extended Metaphor: She is a rose. Be wary of her thorns as they are dangerous to careless souls. Resolutely care for her and she will blossom, sharing her secrets with you. She is the strongest flower in society’s garden. Extended metaphors compare multiple aspects of the objects.

5 Extended Metaphor Example: Shakespeare’s As You Like It JAQUES All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation  Here, Shakespeare creates an extended metaphor comparing life to a play.  He compares life’s stages to seven acts.  Act I: the infant  Act II: the school-boy  Act III: the lover  Act IV: a soldier

6 Extended Metaphor Example: Shakespeare’s As You Like It Jacques’ Speech Continued: Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything. Shakespeare, William. As You Like It. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. Web. 2 Feb  Act V: the justice  Act VI: the pantaloon  Act VII: the elderly  After naming each stage, Shakespeare shares key characteristics of the stage with the reader.  Shakespeare alerts the reader to the next stage with transition words such as first, then, last.

7 Extended Metaphor Review  Authors create extended metaphors to compare multiple aspects of two objects.  Extended metaphors offer the audience a more detailed, vivid comparison.  Extended metaphors are ideal for breaking down a complicated concept with many parts.

8 Extended Metaphor Review  Non-figurative image: Tom and Alice stood side by side in the lunch line.  Metaphor Tom and Alice stood side by side in the lunch line: two pieces positioned on a chessboard.  Extended Metaphor Tom, after pondering for a moment, carefully took a step closer to Alice, facing her. He asked her to go out with him on Friday night. She said yes. Checkmate.


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