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STOP AND THINK TALK Driving Safely Great Britain has one of the best road safety records in Europe and the world. Despite massive increases in traffic.

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Presentation on theme: "STOP AND THINK TALK Driving Safely Great Britain has one of the best road safety records in Europe and the world. Despite massive increases in traffic."— Presentation transcript:

1 STOP AND THINK TALK Driving Safely Great Britain has one of the best road safety records in Europe and the world. Despite massive increases in traffic over the last few decades, the number of people killed on our roads has fallen from around 5,500 per year in the mid 1980s to just over 2,500 in However, this still means that around 7 people die on Britain’s roads every day. Road Casualties in Great Britain, 2008 Killed - 2,538 - Seriously Injured - 26,034 - Slightly Injured - 202,333 All casualties - 230,905 Common causes of these unnecessary tragedies include: Speeding - Over 700 people a year are killed in crashes in which someone exceeds the speed limit or drives too fast for the conditions. Drink Driving - Over 450 people a year die in crashes in which someone was over the legal drink drive limit. Seat Belt Wearing - Nearly 400 lives each year could be saved if everyone always wore their seat belt. Careless Driving - Over 400 deaths a year involve someone being ‘careless, reckless or in a hurry’. At-work - Around one third of fatal and serious road crashes involve someone at work. Inexperience - Over 300 newly-qualified drivers and their passengers are killed A briefing tool for managers Typical Road Traffic Incidents (Not company related) Two people were hurt, one seriously, when their car turned over on the B1125 near Yoxford. A man was taken to hospital with serious injuries after a multiple pile-up. Four vehicles were involved in the incident. An accident on a European Highway highlighting the potential tragic implications when cars are involved in incidents with larger vehicles. THE DANGERS OF MOBILE PHONES A car driver was talking on a mobile phone when she pulled out from a side street, apparently not seeing the motorcycle. The riders reaction time was not sufficient enough to avoid this accident. The car had two passengers and the bike rider and bike were found INSIDE the car with them. The Volkswagen actually flipped over from the force of impact and landed 20 feet from where the collision took place. All three involved (two in the car and the bike rider) were killed instantly This graphic demonstration was placed at a Motorcycle Fair by the Police and Road Safety Department. (Not company related) This incident involved a Company Truck Mixer, the mixer driver was blameless. The car was travelling on the wrong side of the road when it struck the truck mixer. Two occupants of the car had to be cut free from the wreckage. The car had been in a hurry because the occupants were late for work and it had cut a corner hitting the mixer which was coming over a bridge. “It is better to be late in this world than early in the next”

2 STOP AND THINK TALK Driving Safely Preparation This stop and think talk can be used individually or with a group of people. It is probably best delivered in an office or meeting room and is particularly aimed at car and van drivers who are required to travel as part of their normal work activities. It will also be useful to anyone who drives purely for personal reasons such as commuting or outside of work. Introduction (After reading out the case studies) Driving is an essential part of work for many people and also an important part of many lives outside of the workplace. It is probably one of the most dangerous activities many of us undertake and requires skill and full concentration. Journeys need to be planned, vehicles need to be checked and maintained and drivers need to be fit and alert. Drivers have to take personal responsibility for their actions or inactions, only they can decide if a journey is safe to undertake and only the driver can make the decisions that will keep them and their passengers safe. THE TALK Use the questions below to open the discussion under each heading and then go through the lists explaining in detail each hazard / control and what is expected Hazards & Risks Question 1 – What are the main causes of fatalities when driving? Speeding Driving under influence of alcohol or drugs Carelessness (inattention, preoccupied, tiredness etc.) Not wearing a seatbelt Inexperience Question 2 – What are the Risks associated with Driving? Other traffic – Try to travel outside of peak times Weather – Do not travel in adverse weather where possible. Allow longer stopping distances in wet weather Distraction – Avoid use of mobile phones when driving and never use one without hands free facility Driving in the dark – Ensure lights are working Question 3 – What precautions can Drivers take to ensure they are not speeding? Check your speedometer regularly, especially when leaving high speed roads Know the limits – look for signs, especially at junctions Assume lamp posts mean 30 mph, until signs say otherwise, but remember it could be 20 mph Remember, speed limits are a maximum, not a target 20’s plenty when kids are about – and may even be too fast Try no higher than 3rd gear in a 30 mph limit Recognise what makes you speed - keeping up with traffic, overtaking or being tailgated Concentrate – distracted drivers speed Slow down when entering villages Give yourself time – there’s no need to speed and you won’t necessarily get there quicker Question 4 – When are Drivers most likely to feel tired and potentially fall asleep at the wheel? on long journeys on monotonous roads, such as motorways between 2:00 am and 6:00 am between 2:00 pm and 4:00 pm (especially after eating, or drinking even one alcoholic drink) after having less sleep than normal after drinking alcohol if taking medicines that cause drowsiness on journeys home after night shifts Question 5 – What should you do if you feel tired whilst driving? Do not try to complete the journey (you might never arrive) Find somewhere safe to stop (not the hard shoulder) Drink one or two cups of strong coffee or other high caffeine drinks Take a nap of about 15 minutes But remember, sleep is the only cure for tiredness. So, if necessary, find somewhere safe to stay overnight. Preparation Question 6 – What precautions can Drivers take? Ensure the vehicle is roadworthy, check tyres, lights, wipers and brakes etc. before setting off. Plan routes, including breaks, leaving plenty of time for the Journey. Explore other travel possibilities or the need to travel at all, could meetings be held by telephone / video conferencing. AND FINALLY... Clarify any points as required. Ask if there are any other safety related issues that should be discussed. Get everyone to sign the training declaration. Thank everyone for their participation.

3 STOP AND THINK TALK Driving Safely – Training Record The people listed below have received instruction in Driving Safely as detailed on the previous pages. By signing below they are confirming that they understand the safe systems of working discussed and will adhere to these in the workplace. DateNameSignatureInstructed by


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