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What is plagiarism? NETS-S Standard: 5A) Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. Objective: Identify and.

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Presentation on theme: "What is plagiarism? NETS-S Standard: 5A) Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. Objective: Identify and."— Presentation transcript:

1 What is plagiarism? NETS-S Standard: 5A) Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. Objective: Identify and understand plagiarism.

2 Plagiarism Think about the following scenario and see if this sounds familiar to you. Give a thumbs up or thumbs down. “Chris just found some good “stuff” on the Web for his science report about sharks. He highlights a paragraph that explains that most sharks grow to be only 3 to 4 feet long and can't hurt people. Chris copies it and pastes it into his report. He quickly changes the font so it matches the rest of the report and continues his research.”

3 Did Chris do anything wrong in the previous scenario? Plagiarism Uh-oh. Chris just made a big mistake. Do you know what he did? He committed plagiarism (say: play-juh- rih-zem).

4 Definition: Plagiarism is the act of presenting the words, ideas, images, sounds, or the creative expression of others as your own. The word plagiarism comes from a Latin word for kidnapping. You know that kidnapping is stealing a person. Well, plagiarism is stealing a person's ideas or writing.

5 What does Plagiarism mean? Pair/Share with a partner your definition for plagiarism.

6 Why should I learn about Plagiarism? When you copy you cheat yourself. You limit your own learning. The consequences are not worth the risks! It is only right to give credit to authors whose ideas you use Citing gives authority and strength to the information you present Citing makes it possible for your readers to locate your source Is your reputation valuable to you?

7 Real life importance? What if: Your architect cheated his way through math class. Will your new home be safe? Your lawyer paid for a copy of the bar exam to study. Will the contract she wrote for you stand up in court? The doctor who is treating you for an illness cheated his way through medical school. Would you want that doctor to help you?

8 Remember Students, if: you have included the words and ideas of others in your work that you neglected to cite, you have had help you wouldn’t want your teacher to know about,

9 Two types of plagiarism: Intentional Copying a friend’s work Buying or borrowing papers Cutting and pasting blocks of text from electronic sources without documenting Media “borrowing”without citing Web publishing without permissions of creators Unintentional Careless paraphrasing Poor documentation Quoting excessively Failure to use your own “voice”

10 Excuses It’s okay if I don’t get caught! I was too busy to write that paper! (Job, big game, too much homework!) My teachers expect too much! I’ve got to get into ??? U.! My parents expect “A”s! This assignment was BORING! Everyone does it!

11 Possible school consequences: “F” on the assignment Parent notification Referral to administrators Suspension or dismissal from school activities--sports and extracurricular Note on student record Loss of reputation among the school community

12 Do I have to cite everything?

13 Nope! Facts that are widely known, or Information or judgments considered “common knowledge” Do NOT have to be documented. Hooray for common knowledge!

14 No need to document when: You are discussing your own experiences, observations, or reactions Compiling the results of original research, from science experiments, etc. You are using common knowledge

15 Examples of common knowledge John Adams was our second president The Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 If you see a fact in three or more sources, and you are fairly certain your readers already know this information, it is likely to be “common knowledge.” But when in doubt, cite!

16 Works Cited “Boston Columnist Resigns Amid New Plagiarism Charges.” CNN.com 19 Aug March 2003 Fain, Margaret. “Internet Paper Mills.” Kimbal Library. 12 Feb Lathrop, Ann and Kathleen Foss. Student Cheating and Plagiarism in the Internet Era. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, Lewis, Mark. “Doris Kearns Goodwin And The Credibility Gap.” Forbes.com 2 Feb Dowshen M.D., Steven ​ plagiarism.ppt as Modified by Bruce Phengsiri


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