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Introduction and Background Information  A little over a year ago, in February 2011, the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) hosted the inaugural NAN First Nation.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction and Background Information  A little over a year ago, in February 2011, the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) hosted the inaugural NAN First Nation."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Introduction and Background Information  A little over a year ago, in February 2011, the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) hosted the inaugural NAN First Nation Economic Summit.  The objective was to develop a Discussion Paper on ‘The Future of NAN’s Economy’.  Subsequent to the economic summit the NAN by Resolution No. 09/89 undertook to develop a NAN Economic Development Regional Strategy and Framework.

3 NAN First Nation Communities Inventories Pilot Project  In December 2011, the NAN initiated the NAN First Nation Community Inventories Pilot Project with five First Nation communities.  The participating communities have completed an inventory of what social and economic assets are in place, which ones are missing and established the following socio economic priorities. Social Sectors  The social sectors consisted of nine (9) major social sectors divided in ninety-two (92) sub-social sectors;  Each participating community established its number one and two priorities in each of the nine social sectors;  At the end, one social priority was selected to be implemented.

4 NAN First Nation Communities Inventories Pilot Project Economic Sectors  The economic sectors consisted of seven (7) major economic sectors divided in thirty-one (31) sub- economic sectors;  Each participating community established its number one and two priorities in each of the seven economic sectors;  At the end, one economic priority was selected to be implemented.

5 NAN First Nation Communities Inventories Pilot Project As of today, four of the five communities have completed their asset inventory and the similarities in priorities are astonishing. Some of the economic sector findings were: Business Services  Four out of four communities indicated a general grocery or convenience store with gas services as their first or second priorities; Forestry  Three out of four communities indicated harvesting as their number one and two priorities;

6 NAN First Nation Communities Inventories Pilot Project Energy  Three out of four communities indicated solar energy as their number one and two priorities; Agriculture  Four out of four communities indicated a communal green house as their number one and two priorities; Tourism  Three out of four communities indicated guiding / experiential tourism as their number one and two priorities;

7 NAN First Nation Communities Inventories Pilot Project Fishing  Four out of four communities indicated a Band owned commercial fishing licence as their number one priority and three out of four communities indicated a commercial fish processing plant approved by Agriculture Canada as their number two priority;

8 NAN First Nation Communities Inventories Pilot Project  Three of the five communities have also completed a skills inventory of its membership from the age of sixteen (16) and above.  Based on an on-reserve population of over two thousand members aged sixteen and above the three communities have compiled a skills inventory of 56% of their on-reserve members.  The skills inventory databases, even though community based, will be used to plan targeted capacity building initiatives at a more regional level.

9 NAN First Nation Communities Inventories Pilot Project  These initiatives will be to provide smaller communities who sometimes cannot host these training events with the potential to partner with other NAN First Nation communities given that they both have a uniform system to plan capacity building.  It will also be used to identify members that are work ready and match them with employment opportunities.  The NAN is now planning phase two of the NAN First Nation Community Inventories Project and will be approaching your communities to solicit your participation.

10 NAN Regional Economic Strategic Plan Pre- planning Workshop  On February 23-24, exactly a year after the NAN First Nation Economic Summit, the NAN Economic and Resource Development Unit (ERDU) completed a pre-planning workshop in preparation for the upcoming development of the NAN Regional Economic Strategic Plan (RESP).  The workshop was to take a much closer look at each economic sector taking in consideration the results of the Crow Consulting Information Gathering that was completed in August, 2011.

11 NAN Regional Economic Strategic Plan Pre- planning Workshop  It consisted of thirty interviews and meetings with NAN stakeholders involved in economic development, governance, business, education, health, youth and Aboriginal funding agencies.  The purpose of the Information Gathering was to identify the issues, barriers, success stories and opportunities in economic development.

12 Objectives of the Pre-planning Workshop of February 2012  The Objectives of the Pre-planning Workshop was for the ERD Unit to establish initial draft Vision / Destination Statements to identify and define what strategic success or the strategic end state should be in each economic sector.  This was followed with a SCORE Analysis.

13 Objectives of the Pre-planning Workshop of February 2012  Unlike a SWOT analysis which provides assessments based on Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats, the SCORE Analysis is more geared to economic planning such as:  Strengths  Challenges  Opportunities  Risks  Expectations  Once the SCORE Analysis was completed the ERDU established final draft Vision / Destination Statements from which to receive feedback from its NAN members.

14 Objectives of the NAN Member Feedback  The NAN consists of forty-nine First Nation member communities besides several Aboriginal partners and stakeholders.  There is strength in numbers; but, unity will only be accomplished with clearly defined mandates.  With clearly defined mandates the NAN will increase by a large margin its ability to support and complement your economic projects.

15 Economic Objectives  The NAN wishes to receive the feedback from its First Nation member communities, partners and stakeholders to obtain mandates in key economic sectors where regional approaches have merits.  Three (3) mandates in the Business Services economic sector;  Five (5) mandates in the Forestry economic sector;  Two (2) mandates in the Mining and Exploration economic sector;  One (1) mandate in the Energy economic sector;  One (1) mandate in the Agricultural economic sector;  Two (2) mandates in the Tourism economic sector;  One (1) mandate in the Fishery economic sector.

16 Economic Objectives  In total the NAN ERD Unit will be seeking your feedback to obtain mandates in fifteen (15) economic sectors.  These mandates will be used by the NAN Regional Economic Strategic Planning (RESP) Committee to effectively complete the regional economic strategic plan in  Based on your feedback and the economic mandates you provide the NAN RESP committee will:  Translate the mandates in each economic sector into operational goals and objectives;  Develop the strategies to implement the goals and objectives;  Establish the budgets and timelines.

17 Process to Support, Not Support or Abstain on the Proposed Mandates  In each case the NAN members will be asked to indicate if they support, do not support or abstain to the proposed Vision / Destination Statement.

18 Other Objective of the Consultation  As most of you are aware the Ontario government released the Growth Plan for Northern Ontario in March  At that time the NAN:  Was not sure how many First Nation people had been consulted?  The Growth Plan spoke of supporting existing businesses; but, not new businesses which is crucial to developing the NAN economy.  Mentioned the development of a Northern Policy Institute; but, was not very clear as to what the role of First Nations’ leadership and experts would be;  The implementation section was vague and did not provide timelines for the implementation of each component;

19 NAN Resolution No. 11/14 March 24, 2011  Therefore be it resolved that NAN Chiefs-in-Assembly require that the provincial Growth Plan for Northern Ontario be put on hold until it is amended to coincide with the Economic Development Regional Strategy and Framework. Signed, Grand Chief Stan Beardy Deputy Grand Chief Les Louttit  It is important to note that the support of any of the economic sectors’ mandate is only for the RESP committee to complete the regional strategic plan which will be subject to further feedback from the NAN First Nation member communities, partners and stakeholders.

20 Business Services Groceries, General Goods and Gas Services

21 Business Services Restaurants and Motels

22 Business Services Banking

23 Forestry Siviculture

24 Forestry Forest Firefighting

25 Forestry Tree Harvesting

26 Forestry Transportation

27 Forestry Lumber and Value Added Manufacturing

28 Mining and Exploration Exploration and Drilling Operations

29 Mining and Exploration Mining

30 Energy Energy

31 Agriculture Communal Open Field Gardens / Greenhouses / Cold Storages

32 Tourism Guiding and Experiential Tourism

33 Tourism Tourism Venues (Cabins/Lodges/Remote site with Mobile Accommodations/Tent and Trailer Parks -serviced / un- serviced, Marina Services)

34 Fishing Community Member or Band Owned Commercial Fishing Licences and Agriculture Canada Approved Commercial Fish Processing Plant

35 Northwestern Ontario Joint Task Force (JTF) and North Eastern Ontario Pilot Implementation Projects (NEOPIP)  In summary the objectives of the JTF are:  Strategic regional economic development planning is a continuous and systematic process  This process will create opportunities for the local, regional and Aboriginal communities to fully participate in the planning and implementation of its recommendations  The REDA organization must provide a new vision and level of influence for the future that is consistent with the desires and aspirations of its constituents.

36 Northwestern Ontario Joint Task Force (JTF) and North Eastern Ontario Pilot Implementation Projects (NEOPIP)  The Northwestern Ontario Joint Task Force (JTF) and North Eastern Ontario Pilot Implementation Projects (NEOPIP) were created to act as lead in developing proposed models and implementation plans.  As an example the JTF’s priorities are:  Local decision making;  Collaborative governance;  Participation by all leader groups in the region including Aboriginal;  decision makers have the tools to implement and influence decisions;  Ongoing funding for core operations and research;  All of Northwestern Ontario.

37 Northwestern Ontario Joint Task Force (JTF) and North Eastern Ontario Pilot Implementation Projects (NEOPIP)  In summary the objectives of the JTF are:  Strategic regional economic development planning is a continuous and systematic process  This process will create opportunities for the local, regional and Aboriginal communities to fully participate in the planning and implementation of its recommendations  The REDA organization must provide a new vision and level of influence for the future that is consistent with the desires and aspirations of its constituents.

38 Northwestern Ontario Joint Task Force (JTF) and North Eastern Ontario Pilot Implementation Projects (NEOPIP)

39 Mandate

40 Closing Remarks  We hope that the feedback process to support, or not support, the proposed economic mandates has met with your requirements and informational needs.  The results of the mandates will be posted on the NAN website and further used to develop the NAN Regional Economic Strategic Plan by the RESP committee.  On behalf of the NAN we thank you for your active participation.


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