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CMSC 150 DATA REPRESENTATION CS 150: Mon 30 Jan 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "CMSC 150 DATA REPRESENTATION CS 150: Mon 30 Jan 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 CMSC 150 DATA REPRESENTATION CS 150: Mon 30 Jan 2012

2 What Happens When… 2

3 Steps Of An Executing Program 3 Initially, the program resides as a (binary) file on the disk

4 4 Steps Of An Executing Program When you click an icon to start a program…

5 5 Steps Of An Executing Program the program is copied from disk into memory (RAM)… the program is copied from disk into memory (RAM)…

6 6 Steps Of An Executing Program so the program can be executed by the CPU…

7 … … A Program in Memory  Program: consists of instructions & data  Instructions & data stored together in memory

8 … … Instructions A Program in Memory

9 … … A Program in Memory Instructions Data

10 … … A Program in Memory Instructions Data How do we interpret these 0's and 1's?

11 The Decimal Number System  Deci-  Base is ten  first (rightmost) place:ones (i.e., 10 0 )  second place:tens (i.e., 10 1 )  third place:hundreds (i.e., 10 2 )  …  Digits available: 0, 1, 2, …, 9 (ten total)

12 The Binary Number System  Bi- (two)  bicycle, bicentennial, biphenyl  Base two  first (rightmost) place:ones (i.e., 2 0 )  second place:twos (i.e., 2 1 )  third place:fours (i.e., 2 2 )  …  Digits available: 0, 1 (two total)

13 Lingo  Bit (b): one binary digit (0 or 1)  Byte (B): eight bits  Prefixes:  Kilo (K)= 2 10 = 1024  Mega (M)= 2 20 = 1,048,576 = 2 10 K  Giga (G)= 2 30 = 1,073,741,824 = 2 10 M  Tera (T)= 2 40 = 1,099,511,627,776 = 2 10 G  Peta (P)= 2 50 = 1,125,899,906,842,624 = 2 10 T  …  Yotta (Y)= 2 80 = 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176 = 2 30 P

14 Representing Decimal in Binary  Moving right to left, include a "slot" for every power of two ≤ your decimal number  Then, moving left to right:  Put 1 in the slot if that power of two can be subtracted from your total remaining  Put 0 in the slot if not  Continue until all slots are filled filling to the right with 0's as necessary

15 Example: A Famous Number  Anyone recognize this number ?

16 Example: A Famous Number  Anyone recognize this number ?  8,675, = ????????????????????? 2  What is 2 10 ?

17 Example: A Famous Number  Anyone recognize this number ?  8,675, = ????????????????????? 2  What is 2 10 ? 2 20 ?

18 Example: A Famous Number  Anyone recognize this number ?  8,675, = ????????????????????? 2  What is 2 10 ? 2 20 ? 2 30 ?

19 Example: A Famous Number  Anyone recognize this number ?  8,675, = ????????????????????? 2  What is 2 10 ? 2 20 ? 2 30 ? 2 25 ?

20 Example: A Famous Number  Anyone recognize this number ?  8,675, = ????????????????????? 2  What is 2 10 ? 2 20 ? 2 30 ? 2 25 ?  Need 24 places (bits)  2 23 = 8,388,608

21 To the whiteboard, Robin !

22 Example: A Famous Number  Anyone recognize this number ?  8,675, =  Fewer available digits in binary more space required for representation

23 Converting Binary to Decimal  For each 1, add the corresponding power of two 

24 Converting Binary to Decimal  For each 1, add the corresponding power of two  =

25 Now You Get The Joke THERE ARE 10 TYPES OF PEOPLE IN THE WORLD: THOSE WHO CAN COUNT IN BINARY AND THOSE WHO CAN'T

26 Why Binary? ABA xor BA and B  Circuits: low voltage == 0, high voltage == 1

27 Why Binary? ABA xor BA and B  Circuits: low voltage == 0, high voltage == 1

28 Why Binary? ABA xor BA and B A + B sum A + B carry  Circuits: low voltage == 0, high voltage == 1 Half Adder

29 An Alternative to Binary?  = 8,675,  = 8,544,237 10

30 An Alternative to Binary?  = 8,675,  = 8,544, What if this was km to landing?

31 The Hexadecimal Number System  Hexa- (six) Decimal (ten)  Base sixteen  first (rightmost) place:ones (i.e., 16 0 )  second place:sixteens (i.e., 16 1 )  third place:two-hundred-fifty-sixes (i.e., 16 2 )  …  Digits available: sixteen total 0, 1, 2, …, 9, A, B, C, D, E, F

32 Wikipedia says…  Donald Knuth has pointed out that the etymologically correct term is "senidenary", from the Latin term for "grouped by 16".  The terms "binary", "ternary" and "quaternary" are from the same Latin construction, and the etymologically correct term for "decimal" arithmetic is "denary".  Schwartzman notes that the pure expectation from the form of usual Latin-type phrasing would be "sexadecimal", but then computer hackers would be tempted to shorten the word to "sex".

33 Using Hex  Can convert decimal to hex and vice-versa  process is similar, but using base 16 and 0-9, A-F  Most commonly used as a shorthand for binary  Avoid this

34 More About Binary  How many different things can you represent using binary:  with only one slot (i.e., one bit)?  with two slots (i.e., two bits)?  with three bits?  with n bits?

35 More About Binary  How many different things can you represent using binary:  with only one slot (i.e., one bit)?2  with two slots (i.e., two bits)?2 2 = 4  with three bits?2 3 = 8  with n bits?2 n

36 Binary vs. Hex  One slot in hex can be one of 16 values 0, 1, 2, …, 9, A, B, C, D, E, F  How many bits to represent one hex digit?  I.e., how many bits to represent 16 different things?

37 Binary vs. Hex  One slot in hex can be one of 16 values 0, 1, 2, …, 9, A, B, C, D, E, F  How many bits to represent one hex digit?  4 bits can represent 2 4 = 16 different values

38 Binary vs. Hex A1010 B1011 C1100 D1101 E1110 F1111

39 Converting Binary to Hex  Moving right to left, group into bits of four  Convert each four-group to corresponding hex digit 

40 Converting Binary to Hex  Moving right to left, group into bits of four  Convert each four-group to corresponding hex digit 

41 Converting Binary to Hex  Moving right to left, group into bits of four  Convert each four-group to corresponding hex digit   F E D  = 845FED 16

42 Converting Hex to Binary  Convert each hex digit to four-bit binary equivalent  BEEF 16 = ???? 2

43 Converting Hex to Binary  Convert each hex digit to four-bit binary equivalent  BEEF 16 =

44 Representing Different Information  So far, everything has been a number  What about characters? Punctuation?  Idea:  put all the characters, punctuation in order  assign a unique number to each  done! (we know how to represent numbers)

45 ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange

46 'A' = = 'c' = = '8' = = ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange

47 256 total characters… How many bits needed? ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange

48 The Problem with ASCII  What about Greek characters? Chinese?  UNICODE: use more bits  UTF-8: use 1-4 eight-bit bytes  1,112,064 “code points”  backward compatible w/ ASCII  How many characters could we represent w/ 32 bits?  2 32 = 4,294,967,296

49 You Control The Information  What is this?

50 You Control The Information  What is this?  Depends on how you interpret it:  =  = 'M'  = one million one thousand one hundred & one  A machine-language instruction  You must be clear on representation and interpretation

51 Strings…  "1000"  There are four characters '1' '0' '0' '0'  The binary representation is  =

52 Strings…  "1000"  There are four characters '1' '0' '0' '0'  The binary representation is  = “1234” ≠ 1234

53 One Last Thing…  Real valued (AKA floating point) numbers?  Round-off error!  FLOPS: Floating Point Operations Per Second

54 One Last Thing…  Real valued (AKA floating point) numbers?  Round-off error!  FLOPS: Floating Point Operations Per Second


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