Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The SME Policy Assessment in Israel March 3-8, 2013 Olena Bekh & Sabina Nari European Training Foundation.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The SME Policy Assessment in Israel March 3-8, 2013 Olena Bekh & Sabina Nari European Training Foundation."— Presentation transcript:

1 The SME Policy Assessment in Israel March 3-8, 2013 Olena Bekh & Sabina Nari European Training Foundation

2 “The Wise Men Report” “Project Europe 2030: Challenges and Opportunities”) Was prepared for the European Council in May 2010 by the Reflection Group. The report states: “Human capital is the key strategic instrument for ensuring success in the global economy. And yet, Europe has lost considerable ground in the race to a knowledge economy. Catching up will require a coordinated effort. Member States must mobilise the resources they agreed to invest in R&D, with the help of the private sector, and reform all aspects of education, including professional training.” Looking behind the horizon of 2030…

3 ETF and why indicators?  EU specialist agency supporting 31 countries with human capital developments  EU policy drivers: SBA, key competence, ‘rethinking education’, employment guidelines (EU2020)  Policy support indicators: developed by country experts (ownership)  Tool for self-directed development, comparative assessment, good practice exchange, EU monitoring

4 4 Small Business Act policy assessment Principles 1. Entrepreneurship education and training 2. Second chance 3. Rules for ‘Think Small First’ 4. Responsive public administration 5. SMEs and public procurement 6. Access to finance 7. SME opportunities & EU Single Market 8. Skills & innovation 9. SMEs and environmental concerns 10. SMEs in growth markets Indicators (8 indicators) Lifelong entrepreneurial learning policy Secondary and tertiary education Good practice University-enterprise cooperation Non-formal entrepreneurial learning Indicators (9 indicators) Training Needs Analysis (TNA) Availability of training Start-ups, Enterprise training Enterprise growth Access to international markets Quality assurance Women’s entrepreneurship Skills for sustainable eneterprise develoment Data & Indicators Meeting, 11 December 2012

5 5 - Level 1Level 5Level 4Level 3Level 2 Each indicator  5 level scale  cumulative  max 3-4 years No system Ad hoc activities Dialogue, planning Break even point Implementation M&E Review Improvement Logic of each indicator

6 Indicators for human capital  Primarily qualitative or ‘process’ indicators – not quantitative  Objective: support governments, private sector and civic interest groups in establishing an entrepreneurial learning and enterprise skills eco-system: policy, structures & delivery frameworks 6 Data & Indicators Meeting, 11 December 2012

7 Entrepreneurial learning ‘All forms of education and training, both formal and non-formal, which contribute to an entrepreneurial spirit and entrepreneurial behaviour with or without a commercial objective.’ (ETF, 2009) Entrepreneur ‘An entrepreneur is someone who seeks out opportunities, takes initiatives often based on risk and through new ventures decides how resources can be most effectively applied. Driven by the need for achievement, the entrepreneur may not necessarily be motivated by profit but use it as a measure of success.’ (ETF, 2009) Let’s get the terms clear!

8 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 1: Policy

9 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 2: Good Practice

10 Refers to education and training which may be delivered through the national education system as well as outside the system (e.g. by NGOs, private service providers) but which is not subject to formal assessment e.g. examinations Voluntary and accessible for all Obtained at different times and in different places Learning process is linked to learning objectives Complementary to other parts of LLL, first of all – formal education Based on active actions an experience and contributes to formation of respective competences Non-formal education and training

11 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 3: Non-Formal Learning

12 Entrepreneurship across all levels of education – the «Domino Effect» in life-long entrepreneurial learning ISCED 2 – Key competence development in preparation for future life Schools as part of local communities, parents Entrepreneurial culture and attitudes ISCED 3 – Key competence – building foundation for future employment Entrepreneurial mind-set: not only about start-ups Team work, projects, career guidance, personal development and initiative ISCED 5&6 – Innovation and technology Entrepreneurship in non-business faculties Boosting self-employment National competitiveness Universities as part of regional development

13 EU Key Competences 2005 feature entrepreneurship

14 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 4: Lower Secondary Education (ISCED 2)

15 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 5: Upper Secondary Education (ISCED 3)

16 ENTREPRENEURIAL SOCIETY Entrepreneurial Students Entrepreneurial Teachers and Management Parents Local Community Entrepreneurial School

17 SEECEL’s work: Entrepreneurial School?  In order to promote entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial learning and entrepreneurial literacy as stepping stones towards an entrepreneurial society schools must become a nucleus of action.  The ethos of entrepreneurship is to turn ideas into action and this is not possible without the transformation of a school into an open learning environment.  In order to be equipped to support the creation of an entrepreneurial society, schools themselves need to become entrepreneurial — thus becoming entrepreneurial schools.  This is not to say that schools will turn into businesses and commercialize their activities and culture, but instead to act as a centre for promoting an entrepreneurial mindset in the learning processes in a classroom, in every day school life and in the local community. 17

18 ETF’s Pilot Project: “Across-Campus Entrepreneurship” in Third-level Education  a request in by the governments from the sixteen partner countries of the EU pre-accession and Southern Mediterranean region to bring forward entrepreneurship promotion in third-level education.  ETF mobilised experts from all countries to elaborate a first set of applied indicators for entrepreneurship promotion in tertiary education.  This initiative built on an EU recommendation for ‘across-campus’ entrepreneurship promotion. Five indicators elaborated to support “across campus” implementation: Higher Education Policy Good Practice University Strategy Staff Development University-Enterprise Cooperation 18

19 ETF’s Pilot Project: “Across-Campus Entrepreneurship” in Third-level Education  Université de Sfax (Tunisia),  University of Bitola (FYR of Macedonia),  Polytechnic of Tirana (Albania),  Université de Bordj Bou Arreridj (Algeria),  University of Sarajevo (Bosnia & Herzegovina),  American University of Cairo (Egypt),  University of Prishtina (Kosovo under UNSC 1244),  Université de Casablanca (Hassan II) (Morocco),  University of Montenegro (Montenegro),  University of Kragujevac (Serbia),  American University of Beirut (Lebanon),  Yarmouk University (Jordan),  Israel Institute of Technology (Israel),  University of Zadar (Croatia),  Palestine Technical University (Occupied Palestinian Territories),  Bilkent University (Turkey),  Politecnico di Torino (Italy),  Donetsk State University of Management (Ukraine) 19

20 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 6: National Higher Education Policy on Entrepreneurial Learning NEW

21 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 7: Good Practice in Higher Education NEW

22 SBA Principle I: Create an environment in which entrepreneurs and family business can thrive entrepreneurship is rewarded Indicator 8: NEW Higher Education cooperation with the world of business

23 Thank you! ETF Enterprising People Questions to: Name: Olena Bekh Name: Sabina Nari Telephone: Website:


Download ppt "The SME Policy Assessment in Israel March 3-8, 2013 Olena Bekh & Sabina Nari European Training Foundation."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google