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Colin Bennett. Buffalo soldier, dreadlock rasta There was a buffalo soldier in the heart of America Stolen from Africa, brought to America Fighting on.

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Presentation on theme: "Colin Bennett. Buffalo soldier, dreadlock rasta There was a buffalo soldier in the heart of America Stolen from Africa, brought to America Fighting on."— Presentation transcript:

1 Colin Bennett

2 Buffalo soldier, dreadlock rasta There was a buffalo soldier in the heart of America Stolen from Africa, brought to America Fighting on arrival, fighting for survivalBuffalo soldierdreadlock rasta Stolen from Africa I mean it when I analyze the stench I mean it when I analyze the stench To me it makes a lot of sense How the dreadlock rasta was the buffalo soldier And he was taken from Africa, brought to America Fighting on arrival, fighting for survivalsensesoldierAmericaarrivalsurvival

3 Said he was a buffalo soldier, dreadlock rasta Buffalo soldier in the heart of America If you know your history Then you would know where you're coming from Then you wouldn't have to ask me Who the 'eck do I think I am If you know your history I'm just a buffalo soldier in the heart of America Stolen from Africa, brought to America Said he was fighting on arrival, fighting for survival Said he was a buffalo soldier, win the war for Americain the heart of Americawin the war for America

4 Dreadie, woy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy Buffalo soldier troddin' through the land, wo-ho- ooh Said he wanna ran and then you wanna hand Troddin' through the land, yea-hea, yea-ea Said he was a buffalo soldier, win the war for America Buffalo soldier, dreadlock rasta Fighting on arrival, fighting for survival Driven from the mainland to the heart of the Caribbeanwoy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy

5 Singing, woy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy Troddin' through San Juan in the arms of America Troddin' through Jamaica, a buffalo soldier Fighting on arrival, fighting for survival Buffalo soldier, dreadlock rasta Woy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy, woy yoy-yoy yoy Woy yoy yoy yoy, yoy yoy-yoy yoy Troddin' through San Juanin the arms of America

6 Ayy we make citations

7  Robert Nesta Marley was born on February 6, 1945 in St. Ann, Jamaica. When Bob was a young boy he moved from St. Ann to West Kingston with his mother. As a young boy in West Kingston, also known as Trenchtown, Marley enrolled in a music class with one of his good friends. At the age of sixteen, Bob had decided that he wanted to be a musician and began to pursue his dream. He was introduced to a producer named Leslie Kong, and although he auditioned extremely well his singles, “Judge Not” and “One More Cup of Coffee”, failed to be a success. Bob first found success in the music industry with his group The Wailing Wailers, which he formed with his friends. A few years later on February 10, 1966, Bob married his girlfriend Rita Anderson. That same year Bob and his band changed their music style and band name to, Rock Steady and Wailers respectively. In 1970 the Wailers were gaining popularity, but weren’t internationally known. They created a new record label called Tuff Gong and met Johnny Nash. Bob toured with Johnny and things started moving for the Wailers. The Wailers worked out a deal to open 17 shows for Sly and the Family Stone. They were fired after 4 shows because they were more popular. They also opened a few concerts for Bruce Springsteen and did a live radio broadcast concert, the popularity of the Wailers was now reaching the U.S. Bob continued to be a huge success, touring and recording until 1977 when he was told that toe he had injured while playing football was cancerous. Amputation would have rid him of the cancer, but he refused because it was against his Rastafarian beliefs. Bob continued tour through 1980 when he and his band collaborated with Stevie Wonder for an American tour. Bob was very sick at this time, but still wanted to do the tour and was cleared by his doctor to do so. He completed concerts in both Boston and New York, before he was diagnosed with a brain tumor while in New York. His wife wanted him to stop performing, but he persisted and performed one last, unforgettable concert in Pittsburgh. Bob could no longer go on with his music. He managed to stay alive for much longer than expected and even tried a controversial treatment in Germany, but he ultimately died in Miami on May 11, (reggaeradio.com) Bob Marley back

8 This song is about the young african American men and even Some women that fought against the Native Americans in the Indian Wars of from 1867 through the 1870’s. The Buffalo Soldiers led some of the strongest infantries in this war. (Davis, Stanford L. ) back

9  This lyric by Marley is about the Buffalo Soldier that he had that he is talking about in this song. The man, who just so happened to be a Buffalo Soldier was part of the Rast- afarian. The Rastafarian movement was a type of religious movement that included the believers growing out dreadlocks and smoking marijua- na with the belief that it would bring them closer to their God, Jah. (Mullin, Matthew) back

10  Marley references slavery in this  song because the buffalo soldiers were slaves who were ultimately fighting for their freedom in their country. Marley states that these Buffalo Soldiers were “stolen from Africa” and “brought to America” and that was exactly how it happened. They were told that they would be freed if they served. I believe that he sums it up best with his lyric; “fighting on arrival, fighting for survival”, it really showcases the bravery that these men showed. (Davis, Ronald L.F. ) back

11  In this metaphor we have Marley comparing the situation to an odor. He obviously didn’t investigate an odor in the reference cited. I take it that he is comparing the war to a stinky situation in which he believes that there is corruption in how his people are being used in the war. back

12  Even with all of the historical and sentimental meaning attached to this song, it is also that, a song. He used a common, aa bb cc, rhyme scheme to make the song catchy and to really keep the message of his song in people’s heads so they would remember the Buffalo Soldiers anytime the song would come across their minds. back

13  Marley refers back to African Herit-  age hinting that if they knew their h-  istory then they would have never  participated in a war. The African  heritage is one of peace and tranquility. A heritage where equality was the main order of business, so a war would contradict their heritage’s beliefs. (Giblin, James) back

14  Marley says “in the heart of America” possibly referring to the center of the United States as during the time referenced in the song, the country was rapidly expanding westward. The figure of speech that Marley uses in this situation is very fitting. It paints a good a picture in the mind as to where the location of the description is in the country. back

15  The Indian Wars were fought on  American soil during the time period of the mid to late 1800’s as the settlers were expanding westward. The goal was to put the Native Americans on reservations so that they, the settlers, could settle in the west and create communities there. The Natives would not give up their land without a fight so the settlers had to retaliate which ultimately led to the Indian Wars. (Davis, Stanford L. ) back

16  Marley uses this melodic tune of repetition to make his song catchy and enjoyable. Repetition is often used as a way of getting an important point across, typically using a specific phrase with some sort of meaning. However Marley uses repetition in this situation as an attempt at getting his song into people’s head and hopefully pocketing some of their money. back

17  The Battle at San Juan Hill was a battle unrelated to the Indian Wars. The Buffalo Soldiers were still very much involved in this battle though. The battle finally got the Buffalo  Soldiers the attention, credit,  and praise that they deserved.  Tabloids all over the country  wrote accounts on how crucial  the Buffalo Soldiers were to  the American victory at San  Juan Hill in back

18  Marley uses another example of personification here as he infers that the Buffalo Soldiers were battling “in the arms of America”, simply translated as the men were fighting for the rights of Americans and not necessarily for the right of the ancestors. The Americans took the Buffalo Soldiers through San Juan in a huge battle once again for the rights of Americans, the Buffalo Soldiers were as courageous as they come. back


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