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Integrated Art Lessons: A Classroom Resource for Teachers Presented by: Cameron Art Museum 3201 South 17 th Street Wilmington, North Carolina 28412 www.cameronartmuseum.com.

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Presentation on theme: "Integrated Art Lessons: A Classroom Resource for Teachers Presented by: Cameron Art Museum 3201 South 17 th Street Wilmington, North Carolina 28412 www.cameronartmuseum.com."— Presentation transcript:

1 Integrated Art Lessons: A Classroom Resource for Teachers Presented by: Cameron Art Museum 3201 South 17 th Street Wilmington, North Carolina In cooperation with: The A+ Schools Program The University of North Carolina at Greensboro P. O. Box Greensboro, North Carolina aplus-schools.uncg.edu Funded by a grant from the Corning Foundation Author: Martha Burdette

2 Lesson Sixteen Integrated Concepts Language Arts: oral language, descriptive language Social Studies: roles in society Visual Art: portraits, texture, background, color, detail, space

3 A portrait usually presents an image that can be recognized as the individual the artist is portraying, but it may not look exactly like that person. The title is often something like “A Portrait of Mary Smith”. When an artist makes a painting or drawing intended to represent an individual, it is called a portrait.

4 Let’s take some time to look carefully at these paintings. The one on the left is titled, “Portrait of a Gentleman”. The one on the right is called, “Portrait of Ruth DeWitt”. Both of these paintings are portraits.

5 Can you find any evidence to help you predict when each of these portraits was painted. For clues, look at clothing, hair styles, background.

6 Can you spot any clues to indicate the setting of these paintings? Can you compare and contrast the two portraits? How are they alike? How are they different? Look carefully at color, texture, space, and light.

7 Can you make predictions about these people from looking at their portraits? What are their roles in society? Are they parents? Do they have a large or small family? Do they have jobs? What kind of work do they do? Are the rich or poor? Support your answers.

8 Think about your school pictures. They are portraits of you. How are they alike or different from these portraits? Do your school portraits have a painted background or can you see what was really behind you when the picture was taken?

9 About how long does it take for the photographer to make your portrait at school? How would you feel about sitting still long enough for an artist to paint or draw a portrait of you?

10 Before cameras were invented, the only way people could have a portrait or themselves or a friend or family member was to ask an artist to draw or paint it for them. Now, most people use camera to make portraits or pictures, but some people still like to have their portrait painted by an artist. Which would you prefer? Tell why.

11 Title: “Portrait of a Gentleman” Artist/Dates: Jacob Marling, American, Medium: oil on board Size: 27” x 21.5” Date: 1824 Title: “Portrait of Ruth DeWitt” Artist/Dates: Vollian Rann, American, Medium: pastel Size: 16” x 14” Date: What else would you like to know about the art or the artists? How can you find out? Information about the art and the artists


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