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Southern Face Vessels from 1840 to Present Face Vessels, Stoneware, United States, 19th and 20th century, Makers unknown. From the Eleanor and Mabel Van.

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Presentation on theme: "Southern Face Vessels from 1840 to Present Face Vessels, Stoneware, United States, 19th and 20th century, Makers unknown. From the Eleanor and Mabel Van."— Presentation transcript:

1 Southern Face Vessels from 1840 to Present Face Vessels, Stoneware, United States, 19th and 20th century, Makers unknown. From the Eleanor and Mabel Van Alstyne Collection of American Folk Art Making Faces

2 This distinctive type of ceramic vessel appeared in the American South in the mid-1800’s. A small number of Black slaves working as potters in the Edgefield District of South Carolina made these face jugs. These vessels may have had religious or burial significance or may reflect slaves attempting to maintain their personal identities under cruel and often difficult conditions. Face Vessels have been found along the routes of the Underground Railroad and on gravesites, indicating how highly valued and connected they were with the enslaved African American culture. Usually jugs but sometimes crocks or pitchers were made with a face molded into the object using white clay for eyes and teeth.

3 Slave potter “Dave” (David Drake) from Edgefield, South Carolina could read and write, and was owned by publishers of a newspaper. Under the risk of severe punishment, this slave potter created jugs with rebellious sayings on them. Many of today's producers of face jugs are 3 rd or 4 th generation potters. Lanier Meaders of Georgia and Burlon (B.B.) Craig of North Carolina are a few notable pottters largely responsible for the increased popularity of the jugs since the 1970’s. A face jug made by Lanier Meaders can be worth up to $30,000 or more! His work is on display in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.Smithsonian Institute Pottery with Dave’s name on it can be worth up to $140,000. Monkey-form face jug signed “CHANDLER / MAKER,” ca H. 11 inches. Private collection; courtesy of McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina.

4 Gain appreciation and knowledge of art history - specifically the African American contributions to primitive folk art created in the Southern region of the U.S. Use the Internet to research Face Vessels in African American Folk and Primitive Art. Imagine and then sketch in pencil, expressive vessel face designs. Form in clay using slab, coil or pinch methods, an expressive face vessel in the spirit of Edgefield Potteries.Edgefield Potteries Learn about glazing and firing techniques. Apply a color scheme in glaze to complete the project. Southern face jug by Lanier Meaders ( ), White County, Georgia. Greene alkaline glaze, black glazed pupils. Signed on bottom "Lanier Meaders". Consigner bought this face jug directly from Lanier Meaders in Condition - firing crack in handle with glaze pooled in the crack, otherwise excellent. 9 1/2" height. Estimate $700-$900.

5 Sketch 2 to 3 designs of expressive faces and vessel shapes. Express yourself! Show emotion! I want DRAMA!!! Consider monster faces, half-animal faces or a distorted face design. Imagination is the key.

6 Your vessels should be 6-10 inches high. You may use one or a combination of these building methods: pinch, coil and/or slab. The width is up to you but a form that is narrow at the top, rounds and widens through the middle, and then narrows again at bottom is traditional. Attach a handle or two (or three). Last but not least, sculpt the facial features by adding and subtracting clay for a highly three-dimensional face.

7 This project will be counted as your Final Exam grade! It is worth 20% of your Final Average. Please, no crying... Show me what you’ve learned so far in Ceramics. I am expecting GREAT things!

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