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IMSS005 Computer Science Seminar Lecture 3 Citation and References Preparing Figures and Tables Presentation Skill.

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Presentation on theme: "IMSS005 Computer Science Seminar Lecture 3 Citation and References Preparing Figures and Tables Presentation Skill."— Presentation transcript:

1 IMSS005 Computer Science Seminar Lecture 3 Citation and References Preparing Figures and Tables Presentation Skill

2 Citation and References Am I writing properly? If you have committed plagiarism, you will be given F grade regardless of your presentation.

3 Citation  When I read students' work, I can quickly spot any potential plagiarism since the writing style is different from one sentence to another.  If you are weak in English, it is even more obvious.  There are also software which can be used to detect plagiarism.  So, Don't take that risk!  Besides, your thesis or paper could be made available on the Internet at later stage.  You could be telling to the whole world that you have copied someone's work.

4 Citation  Proper referencing is very important for all students.  Without proper referencing, You can be accused of plagiarism. You will also be disqualified for your thesis defense. It is a very serious offense.

5 Citation  Always quote somebody's words. For example, if you want to use a definition from a book, you can write something like this:  David [1] A workflow management system as "a kind of intelligent program". References  [1] David. An interesting book on workflow management. Springer, 2006.

6 Citation  If you want to repeat someone's idea, you have to rewrite it in your own words and you have to cite the reference which contains that idea. For example, you want to borrow the idea of David and use it in your thesis. You can write something like:  David [1] argues that a workflow management system is kind of dumb and naive program with little or no intelligence. References  [1] David. An interesting book on workflow management. Springer, 2006.

7 Citation  If the reference (in square bracket) is crossed out, the remaining sentence, including punctuation, must still be correct. Examples:  David [1] argued that …  The system developed by David [1] is …  AI has been effective as David [1] claims …  In contrast, David [1] has reported that …

8 Citation  If there are more than one authors: Wellman et al. [144] have proposed a competition framework for intelligent agents. References  [144] M. P. Wellman, A. Greenwald, P. Stone, and P. R. Wurman. The 2001 trading Agent competition. In Proceedings of the 14th Annual Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence (IAAI-02), pages , Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 2002.

9 Citation  Where to put citation: Decide whether names, concept (term) or dates are important.  If names are important, then insert after the names. e.g. David [1]  If dates are important, then insert after date. e.g. … discovered in 1980 [1].  If concept (term) is important, then insert after the concept. e.g. Fuzzy Logic [1]

10 Citation  If you are introducing a term, you must cite at the first appearance of the term in your thesis/report. e.g. In your report, if you talk about Fuzzy Logic, you should cite the most prominent/earliest reference that first address/invent Fuzzy Logic. Fuzzy Logic [6] allows reasoning based on partial set membership rather than crisp set membership. References  [6] Zadeh, L. Outline of a new approach to the analysis of complex system and decision process, IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC-3(1),

11 Citation  Consistent: If you are writing names in abbreviation, then write entries in abbreviation. E.g., do not write Yain-Whar Si in one entry and Y-W Si in another entry. If you cite more than one paper of an author, then it is even more obvious.  [144] M. P. Wellman, A. Greenwald, P. Stone, and P. R. Wurman. The 2001 trading Agent competition. In Proceedings of the 14th Annual Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence (IAAI-02), pages , Edmonton, Alberta, Canada,  [145] M. P. Wellman and P. R. Wurman. Real time issues for Internet auctions. In Proceedings of the 1st IEEE Workshop on Dependable and Real- time E-commerce Systems (DARE-98), Denver, Colorado, USA, June Available from ftp://ftp.eecs.umich.edu/people/wellman/dare98.ps, accessed 6-Aug-2004.ftp.eecs.umich.edu/people/wellman/dare98.ps The same for other entries, for instance, "Pages" and "pp", "5th" or "Fifth", "Sept" or "September".

12 Citation  Sufficient Information: Each reference entry "must" contain sufficient information so that people can locate that reference. E.g. do you have following information in your reference?  Name of authors,  title of the article,  Name of Journal, Book, proceedings  Volume no, issue no, Page numbers  Year  Publisher

13 What to cite  Cite only significant published references: Journals and transactions (e.g. ACM, IEEE) Conference proceedings Workshop proceedings Books  Avoid unpublished data, theses, and homepages from Internet (e.g. WikiPedia). Cite them only if such references seem absolutely essential and cannot be avoided. Otherwise, do not cite them!

14 Citation style  Author-date style In the text or document  Surname of the author  and year of publication  E.g., (Abramson & Watson, 2003)  For 4 names or above, use first author and et al.  E.g., (Abramson et al., 2003) List of references  Listed in alphabetical order of the surnames of the authors, then year.

15 Citation style  Numerical style with abbreviation In the text or document  Each citation is given a unique number  E.g., in a previous study [3, 10]. List of references  Not listed alphabetically, but in numerical orders  IEEE style?

16 Last words  Do not insult the authors in your literature review: e.g. Lawrence [1] totally overlooked the issues of …..  Instead, you may write The approach proposed by Lawrence [1] does not take into account …

17 Examples  Web site or Homepage from the Internet: [1] Auction Sentry. accessed 6-Aug

18 Examples  Software: [5] CPN Tools, Computer Tool for Coloured Petri Nets /cpntools/cpntools.wiki, accessed 6-Aug http://wiki.daimi.au.dk

19 Examples  Technical Specification from the Internet: [10] FIPA Communicative Act Library Specification. fipa00037/, accessed 6-Aug-2004.http://www.fipa.org/specs/

20 Examples  Journal: [36] P. Anthony and N. R. Jennings. Developing a bidding agent for multiple heterogeneous auctions. ACM Transactions on Internet Technology, 2(3): , [38] M. Beer, M. d'Inverno, M. Luck, N. Jennings, C. Preist, and M. Schroeder. Negotiation in multi-agent systems. Knowledge Engineering Review, 14(3): , September 1999.

21 Examples  Conference and workshop proceedings: [92] K. Larson and T. W. Sandholm. An alternating offers bargaining model for computationally limited agents. In Proceedings of the 1st International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS), pages , Bologna, Italy, ACM. [94] F. Maraninchi. Argonaute: Graphical description, semantics and verification of reactive systems by using a process algebra. In J. Sifakis, editor, International Workshop on Automatic Verification Methods for Finite State Systems, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages Springer Verlag, Grenoble, France, June 1989.

22 Examples  Technical Report: [116] I. Rahwan, P. McBurney, and L. Sonenberg. Towards a theory of negotiation strategy (a preliminary report). Technical Report ULCS , Department of Computer Science, University of Liverpool, May Available at uk/research/techreports/tr2003/ulcs ps, accessed 6-Aug

23 Examples  Book: [133] J. M. Spivey. The Z Notation: A Reference Manual. Prentice Hall International Series in Computer Science, 2nd edition, 1992.

24 Examples  PhD Thesis: [138] A. H. M. ter Hofstede. Information Modelling in Data Intensive Domain. PhD thesis, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 1993.

25 Special cases  Same authors, same year, different titles? C.M. Vong. Paper 1. …, 2006a. C.M. Vong. Paper 2. …, 2006b. To cite:  (Vong, 2006a; Vong, 2006b)

26 Preparing Figures and Tables

27 Using industry standard notation  Remember, a "good" picture is worth a thousand words. notations  A "good" picture is not a picture with meaningless notations.  Whenever you draw a diagram, you should use well recognized notations from the computer science area. E.g, you should use DFD, UML,..etc and should strictly follow the syntax.

28 Assigning meaningful description  All figures, tables, and graphs should bear meaningful description. With clear and well-explained legend.  For instance, it is "useless" to give such descriptions: Figure 1. My system Table 2. Performance of the system

29

30 Citing figures and tables in your thesis/research proposal  if you have inserted a figure/table in your article, then you must cite it somewhere. E.g., if you have a figure called "Figure 9", then somewhere in your text, you should cite something like this: A workflow model of the library system is depicted in Figure 9.  Note that the above citation (the above sentence) must appear before figure 9 in your document. That means you have to talk about figure 9 before the figure appears. That will allow your reader to understand what is in the figure before actually interpreting it.

31 Final note  If you want to use someone's figures/tables in your article, you must ask for permission from the copyright owner.  If it is granted, you have to state in the figure/table description that the figure/table is used by the permission of the original author.

32 Presentation

33 Content  Adequate introduction  Adequate background  Key points emphasized  Presentation well structured

34 Presentation Skills  Presentation ≠Reading an article  In preparing a presentation Write only main points Not all details  The details are explained by you  Main points For reminding the speakers For giving simple idea to audiences

35 Presentation Skills  Fewer words  More diagrams / animations Keep in mind: A picture is worth a thousand words

36 Presentation Skills  Preparation for Q&A Imagine you are audiences  After reading/listening the presentation,  What questions will you ask?  Then prepare these questions (of course the answer too) for yourselves.


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