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Fundamental Movement Skills Tracy Rothery Student 171666 He played with his skipping rope, He played with his ball. He ran after butterflies, Blue ones.

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Presentation on theme: "Fundamental Movement Skills Tracy Rothery Student 171666 He played with his skipping rope, He played with his ball. He ran after butterflies, Blue ones."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Fundamental Movement Skills Tracy Rothery Student He played with his skipping rope, He played with his ball. He ran after butterflies, Blue ones and red; He did a hundred happy things – And then went to bed. (from ‘Forgotten’ in Now We Are Six, Milne, 1927, p.98)

3  Play Theories  International Perspectives  Play and the EYFS  The EYFS and Physical Activity  The Fundamental Movement Skills Programme  Physical Capital  My Research Project  The FMS Learning, Teaching and Assessment Cycle

4 Vygotsky (1896 – 1934)  The Zone of Proximal Development Someone more skilled can support child physical achievement (Pound and Hughes,2008: 40) Piaget (1896 – 1980)  Cognitive Theory of Play Children need active play to construct their knowledge (Waite-Stupiansky,1997: x) Bruner ( )  Theory of Child Intellectual Development Children learn through actions on physical objects (lifecircles-inc.com, undated) “Play provides a relaxed atmosphere in which learning can easily occur” (uwgb.edu, undated)

5 Reggio Emilia Te Whāriki “The Reggio approach values the learning of the child who expresses himself through... Physical play” (Thornton and Brunton, 2010: 91) Woven into the mat – the requirement for children to develop “growing control of body and physical co-ordination” (Ministry of Education, 1996: 21)

6 “Play is now seen as a major learning tool and increasingly practitioners are asked to look for ways of delivering the curriculum outcomes through play” (Tassoni and Hucker, 2005: v) Early Years Foundation Stage (2008)

7 Children “must be supported in developing an understanding of the importance of physical activity” (DCSF, 2008: 15) Every Child Matters:  Staying Safe  Being Healthy  Enjoying and Achieving  Making a Positive Contribution

8  FMS are important in the development of the ‘whole child’  FMS is best supported when the school, family and community work together  FMS can be embedded in everyday classroom activities  FMS can be learned though play  Movement skill development is age related and not age dependent  Early childhood is the optimal time to teach and learn FMS “Supports early years practitioners to design learning and teaching programmes that incorporate the development of children’s fundamental movement skills” (Hands et al., 2004: 1)

9  Balance  Walk  Climb  Roll  Run  Hop  Jump  Skip  Gallop  Catch  Throw  Kick  Strike

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11 20 sports the Government and its’ agencies have determined to be ‘Priority Sports’ in the UK. The Framework for Sport in England (www.sportengland.org) You have one minute to write down…

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72 00:00 STOP!

73 How have you done?

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84  “developing a range of basic skills permits a child to interact appropriately with their physical environment”  Marsden and Weston (2007: 393)  “physical capital plays a significant part in promoting self-confidence and positive self- esteem”  Whitehead (2005: 12)

85 Learning to HopKey Points  Rationale  Permission  Ethics  Evidence Gathering  Interviews  Photo  Video  Written Observation

86  Pirate Day  Circuits  Seaside Hop Scotch  Mermaid Treasure Hunt

87 FMS Learning, Teaching and Assessment Cycle (Jefferson-Buchanan, 2010)

88  Continue working on initial skill criteria  Introduce the fine tuning skills  Share evidence with Edward and his mum (at Learning Journal cake and coffee morning)  Introduce peer observations (summer term rising 5’s sessions Key Understandings:  FMS are important in the development of the ‘whole child’  FMS is best supported when the school, family and community work together  FMS can be embedded in everyday classroom activities  FMS can be learned though play  Movement skill development is age related and not age dependent  Early childhood is the optimal time to teach and learn FMS

89 Learning Outcomes:  Play Theories  International Perspectives  Play and the EYFS  The EYFS and Physical Activity  The Fundamental Movement Skills Programme  Physical Capital  My Research Project  The FMS Learning, Teaching and Assessment Cycle

90  Bruce, T. (1991) Time to Play in Early Childhood Education. London: Hodder and Stoughton.  DCSF (2008) Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage. 2 nd ed. Nottingham: DCSF Publications.  Hands, B., Martin, M. and Lynch, P. (2004) Fundamental Movement Skills: Learning, Teaching and Assessment. Perth: Steps Professional Development.  Jefferson-Buchanan, R. (2010) Lecture on Fundamental Movement Skills: Module 1. Bath Spa University  Kay, J. and Hallett, E. (2004) ‘Play and parenting – developmental experiences in children aged 0 – 3 years’. In: MacLeod- Brudenell, I. ed. Advanced Early Years Care and Education. Oxford: Heinemann Educational Publishers, pp. 205 – 240.  Lifecircle-inc.com (undated) Theories of Learning in Educational Psychology [Online] available from: (http://www.lifecircles-inc.com/Learningtheories/constructivism/bruner.html) [Accessed ].http://www.lifecircles-inc.com/Learningtheories/constructivism/bruner.html  Marsden, E. and Weston, C. (2007) ‘Locating quality physical education in early years pedagogy’. Sport, Education and Society, 12 (4), pp. 383 – 398.  Ministry of Education (1996) Te Whàriki: Early Childhood Curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media.  Pound, L. and Hughes, C. (2008) How Children Learn: From Montessori to Vygotsky. London: Step Forward Publishing Ltd.  Tassoni, P. and Hucker, K. (2005) Planning Play and the Early Years. 2 nd ed. Oxford: Heinemann Educational Publishers.  Thornton, L. and Brunton, P. (2010) Bringing the Reggio Approach to Your Early Years Practice. 2 nd ed. Abingdon: Routledge.  Uwgb.edu (undated) Theories of Play [Online] available from: [Accessed ].  Waite-Stupiansky, S. (1997) Building Understanding Together: A Constructivist Approach to Early Childhood Education. London: International Thomson Publishing Europe.  Whitehead, M. (2005) Learning and Leadership: The concept of Physical Literacy and the development of a sense of self [Online] available from: [Accessed ].http://www.physical-literacy.org.uk/edmonton2005.pdf


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